Canon Business General

Canon USA: Canon Professional Services

Canon USA has released a new video discussing the features and benefits of CPS (Canon Professional Services).  Unlike other programs, the only qualification needed is how much eligible Canon gear you have.  You don’t have to have professional credentials unlike both Sony and Nikon services, anyone can take advantage of CPS.

With three tiers of photography related memberships (Silver, Gold and Platinum), Canon CPS provides a high level of support for professionals.  CPS is one of the core strengths of the Canon ecosystem, yet is often understated.

Check out the various CPS levels of membership as well as further information on CPS here.

 

Maximilian

The dark side - I've been there
Nov 7, 2013
2,173
104
Germany
#3
Interesting that they have apparently abandoned any requirement that the member be a professional photographer.
Maybe the collection of cutomer data is more important to them than that.
By the way: in Germany/Europe that wasn't needed for years.
Again a sign that Canon is trying to align their different regional CPS programs.
 
Dec 17, 2013
1,295
14
#4
Well, plenty of wealthy amateurs joined up in the past, ignoring the "pro photographer" requirement. I suspect that Canon is recognizing that fact. Pros will always get the extra services (beyond CPS) at major sporting events. Canon knows that there are fewer and fewer pro photographers and more and more wealthy amateurs who own a large number of up-to-date cameras and lenses. It is hard to make a living from photography alone, most people have other gigs - computer consultant, photography classes and tours, etc. Fewer newspapers have even a single full-time photographer. Pros keep their cameras and lenses a long time, and as often as not have other expenses - lighting gear, studio, maybe video, for example. If the client needs properly lit and composed architecture shots at average resolution for an annual report, likely an old 5D2 or 1DX, the 24 and 17mm TS lenses, and a box of lighting gear will be fine for a career.
 
Jul 26, 2011
257
1
#5
I don't even have that much stuff but have 54 points and so would qualify for Platinum. Honestly, I think this is like the insurance business for them. The more people pay for the insurance, the more revenue, and the majority will barely if ever use the services they offer. I sent two lenses ever to them. One was a refurbished Fisheye from them which was faulty on arrival, and the other was my original 70-200 f4 L which was never as sharp as I thought it should be and they adjusted it and it came back MUCH better. So all in all, in about 30 years of owning Canon, I need their services twice. Had I paid for CPS Gold or Platinum these 30 years, I would have spent $3,000 / $9,000 for these two services. Don't get me wrong, I understand that if you are a pro, you need quick turnarounds and the loaner perks I am sure are nice, but for the average Joe like myself, I don't think Gold or Platinum is worth it.
 
Apr 23, 2018
1,088
151
#6
Interesting that they have apparently abandoned any requirement that the member be a professional photographer.

I like that. A lot. I'd like a legal obligation for corporations to offer any sort of customer service program in a totally non-discriminatory way = only differentiation allowed based on dollars/Euros spent on purchases from said corporation. No discrimination allowed based on customer biographics, no matter what profession, age, sex, sexual orientation, country of residence or whatever other personal parameters. None of the corporations business. If they want to differentiate amongst their customers, then strictly on sales volume only.

Should this not be an obvious standard in 2018?
 
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transpo1

EOS Rebel SL2
Jan 12, 2011
635
36
#8
This is Canon trying to differentiate itself from the competition ahead of the Nikon FF release and Sony buzz. It’s a significant advantage.
 

takesome1

EOS 5Ds R II
Aug 23, 2013
1,442
79
#9
Ever notice whenever there's a long row of white lenses one never sees even one of the big green Sigmas?
Ever notice that Canon doesn't make an equivalent lens?
Have you ever seen one of these lenses in the wild?
Maybe Canon knows that 35 lbs $25K monsters like that one will not sell well.
Perhaps Canon marketing isn't as dumb as some think.
 

takesome1

EOS 5Ds R II
Aug 23, 2013
1,442
79
#10
I like that. A lot. I'd like a legal obligation for corporations to offer any sort of customer service program in a totally non-discriminatory way = only differentiation allowed based on dollars/Euros spent on purchases from said corporation. No discrimination allowed based on customer biographics, no matter what profession, age, sex, sexual orientation, country of residence or whatever other personal parameters. None of the corporations business. If they want to differentiate amongst their customers, then strictly on sales volume only.

Should this not be an obvious standard in 2018?
When I signed up for CPS several years ago, I do not remember being offered or asked for either.

But notice the name Canon "Professional" Service.
Not Canon "Amateur with disposable income" Service.
 

CanonFanBoy

EOS 5D Mark IV
Jan 28, 2015
2,614
243
Irving, Texas
#12
Well, plenty of wealthy amateurs joined up in the past, ignoring the "pro photographer" requirement. I suspect that Canon is recognizing that fact. Pros will always get the extra services (beyond CPS) at major sporting events. Canon knows that there are fewer and fewer pro photographers and more and more wealthy amateurs who own a large number of up-to-date cameras and lenses. It is hard to make a living from photography alone, most people have other gigs - computer consultant, photography classes and tours, etc. Fewer newspapers have even a single full-time photographer. Pros keep their cameras and lenses a long time, and as often as not have other expenses - lighting gear, studio, maybe video, for example. If the client needs properly lit and composed architecture shots at average resolution for an annual report, likely an old 5D2 or 1DX, the 24 and 17mm TS lenses, and a box of lighting gear will be fine for a career.
Poor amateurs like me can qualify too. ;)
 
Sep 15, 2012
76
1
500px.com
#13
I haven't watched the video, but when you try to sign up, even for silver level, the terms and conditions (dating from 2014) still say pro is required. :-(

"
Canon Professional Services Program
Terms and Conditions: SILVER MEMBERSHIP - Updated as of January 18, 2014
  • 1. Membership is available only for those individuals, (a) that are full time self-employed, or an employee of a professional imaging business, who plays a direct role in the creation of moving or still images for third parties on a professional basis, (b) are legal residents of the 50 United States or the District of Columbia and (c) who are at least 18 years of age at the time of enrollment. At this time, membership benefits, and repair service are available in the 50 United States and the District of Columbia only.
"
 
Likes: Michael Clark

Talys

Canon 6DII
Feb 16, 2017
1,929
175
Vancouver, BC
#14
I like that. A lot. I'd like a legal obligation for corporations to offer any sort of customer service program in a totally non-discriminatory way = only differentiation allowed based on dollars/Euros spent on purchases from said corporation. No discrimination allowed based on customer biographics, no matter what profession, age, sex, sexual orientation, country of residence or whatever other personal parameters. None of the corporations business. If they want to differentiate amongst their customers, then strictly on sales volume only.

Should this not be an obvious standard in 2018?
As a professional software engineer, speaking for my own industry, NO, ABSOLUTELY NOT. I don't care if it's Cisco, Microsoft, Google, Oracle, IBM, SAP, or whoever -- even the largest of the industry giants have a very limited number of experts. Their time is extremely valuable, and access to them as a professional service should not solely be based on a matter of dollars paid, because it dilutes their availability to industry professionals who will have an much larger overall impact to the channel.

If you look at most companies in the software industry, access to the highest level of professional services that can be purchased require a blend of certifications, proof of work or performance and third party references. And frankly, I'm happy it's that way, because there are far too few resources at the top end to go around.

Looking at CPS, there are some benefits that are scalable and others that are not. For example, the repair benefits should pay for themselves. However, if they fixed cameras and lenses for anyone at major sporting events as long as they paid a professional fee, this would take away from the limited space they'd have to service the real pros.
 
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RGF

How you relate to the issue, is the issue.
Jul 13, 2012
2,778
25
#15
Perhaps Canon realized that they let too many people slip through the "pro" requirement so they are being honest and trying to make a bit of more money off of CPS
 
Feb 20, 2016
74
5
#16
This not the case in Australia, Canon CPS insists you must be a pro no matter how much gear you own. So why does Canon allow different rules in different countries. Most likely the continued gouging of Australians an endeavor taken up by all foreign companies down under
 

RGF

How you relate to the issue, is the issue.
Jul 13, 2012
2,778
25
#17
This not the case in Australia, Canon CPS insists you must be a pro no matter how much gear you own. So why does Canon allow different rules in different countries. Most likely the continued gouging of Australians an endeavor taken up by all foreign companies down under
Or the Aussies did their job better and learned to live within the rules. Us Yanks bent the rules one time too many, too hard and how they are broken???
 

Mikehit

EOS 5D Mark IV
Jul 28, 2015
3,074
277
#18
In Europe the FAQs say "CPS is aimed at professional and semi-professional photographers and videographers. "
And "Yes, it is absolutely free to sign up. Your membership level depends on the Canon equipment you register with us that you already own. "

So it is 'aimed at' professionals but not obligatory.
 

neuroanatomist

Spends too much time on this forum
Jul 21, 2010
23,369
408
#19
For many amateurs, I think a major draw is the evaluation program. At $100/year, it's cheaper than lensrentals.

With 143 points I certainly qualify, but I haven't felt any need to sign up.
 
Jul 26, 2011
257
1
#20
I like that. A lot. I'd like a legal obligation for corporations to offer any sort of customer service program in a totally non-discriminatory way = only differentiation allowed based on dollars/Euros spent on purchases from said corporation. No discrimination allowed based on customer biographics, no matter what profession, age, sex, sexual orientation, country of residence or whatever other personal parameters. None of the corporations business. If they want to differentiate amongst their customers, then strictly on sales volume only.

Should this not be an obvious standard in 2018?
All you are really getting is a sort of insurance you pay for. It's the same type of thing as a extended warranty