8x12? 8x10, Which do you use?

CanonFanBoy

EOS 5D SR
Jan 28, 2015
4,308
1,911
Irving, Texas
Hi guys. I have been doing all my photos in 8x12, 20x30, 40x60. But I also know that 8x10 is popular. Do you vary what you do depending on framing? What is your preferred size?
 

Durf

Picture Taker - Image Maker
I have a small collection of 8 by 12's but most of my prints are 8 by 10's as that size photo albums are cheaper and easier to store prints in.

I own a custom cabinet shop so I can quickly make custom frames for any size prints.

If I print something larger than 8x10 or 8x12 it's usually a 16x20; for some reason, I just really like the looks of a 16x20 size for a larger size print, especially using a mat and a 2 to 3" wood frame.

Pictured is a 8 by 12 print of mine in a cherry and ambrosia wormy maple frame that I made.....
batch_050718_FramedPrints_005.jpg
 

Valvebounce

EOS 5D SR
Apr 3, 2013
4,289
226
52
Isle of Wight
Hi Durf.
Beautiful frame around a great photo, nice!

Sorry no input for original question beyond ‘whatever size my little HP spits out!’

Cheers, Graham.

I have a small collection of 8 by 12's but most of my prints are 8 by 10's as that size photo albums are cheaper and easier to store prints in.

I own a custom cabinet shop so I can quickly make custom frames for any size prints.

If I print something larger than 8x10 or 8x12 it's usually a 16x20; for some reason, I just really like the looks of a 16x20 size for a larger size print, especially using a mat and a 2 to 3" wood frame.

Pictured is a 8 by 12 print of mine in a cherry and ambrosia wormy maple frame that I made.....
 

LDS

EOR R
Sep 14, 2012
1,593
164
While the 2:3 ratio became popular because 35mm film used it, anyway more "square" formats like 4:3, 4:5 were fairly common with medium and large format cameras, and sometimes look more "natural" (our vision is alike), and they are often used in paintings, they have a less strong "orientation".

When I print I select a format that suits the subject best - it can go from panoramic to the 1:1 square format. Sometimes some specific display needs may dictate the format as well.

What I hate is photo paper makers often following office paper sizes - instead of more photographic ones.
 

YuengLinger

EOS 5D MK IV
Dec 20, 2012
2,735
887
Southeastern USA
While the 2:3 ratio became popular because 35mm film used it, anyway more "square" formats like 4:3, 4:5 were fairly common with medium and large format cameras, and sometimes look more "natural" (our vision is alike), and they are often used in paintings, they have a less strong "orientation".

When I print I select a format that suits the subject best - it can go from panoramic to the 1:1 square format. Sometimes some specific display needs may dictate the format as well.

What I hate is photo paper makers often following office paper sizes - instead of more photographic ones.
I think it was tech, ergonomics, and production costs that drove 4:3. The massive popularity of 16:9 screens suggests "natural" is in the eyes of the millions of beholders.

Of course there is a difference between TV and photos we hang on walls, but I believe 8x10 remains popular because that's the size of frame sold at Walmart.
 
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LDS

EOR R
Sep 14, 2012
1,593
164
I think it was tech, ergonomics, and production costs that drove 4:3. The massive popularity of 16:9 screens suggests "natural" is in the eyes of the millions of beholders.
As privatebydesign said, 5:4 works very well in portrait orientation, and that probably made the similar 4:3 a better "all purpose" format. For specific needs other formats were already in use. I have right behind me a city landscape painting, late XIX century, which is about 16:9, and many large paintings may have specific sizes - yet the format became popular only when movies switched to panoramic formats - still, many people find 16:9 monitors less useful for everyday work than 4:3 ones. While the human view is more expanded horizontally than vertically, the main area of focus, the fovea, is far more restricted. Surely for movies the panoramic format works well (and it can accomodate different aspect ratios), even if it means part of the image will be seen by the less sharp peripheral vision (as it happens in reality), but for static images, a more squarer format matching the fovea FOV may work better.
 
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AaronT

EOS 80D
Jan 5, 2013
164
253
Hi guys. I have been doing all my photos in 8x12, 20x30, 40x60. But I also know that 8x10 is popular. Do you vary what you do depending on framing? What is your preferred size?
When I do small prints it is usually 8x10, 12x12, 12x18 and I get them printed at a local Costco. I have a 24" roll printer. I use that for 16x24, 16x16, 24x24, 24x36 (my favourite) and wide panos, up to 84. Here is a photo I printed out at 24x72x300dpi. Also 2 100% crops. Taken across river 1/2 mile away.
DetroitSkyline0920-39web.jpg
0920-39P-crop.jpg
0920-39P-crop2.jpg
 
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