Interesting what's happened since I got an RP.....

Mt Spokane Photography

I post too Much on Here!!
Mar 25, 2011
15,278
552
The huge advantage of the EVF is the ability to see the exposure and adjust exposure as needed as contrasty situations are the bane of auto exposure no matter the hyperbole the manufacturers squeak.
My EVF is worthless for adjusting exposure. Even though its properly adjusted, everything appears blown out. I use the rear LCD to see the exposure. I'm taking shots so fast and lighting is constantly changing that adjusting exposures manually does not work. If I tap the subject on the LCD, it exposes perfectly unless its one of those really contrasty situations. Then I just adjust the compensation.
 

Quirkz

EOS 80D
Oct 30, 2014
101
31
Funny thing, this is exactly what happened to me.

I just got back from a 2 week trip to Japan where I left the 5DIV behind, and took only the RP.

I loved it.

I didn't miss the 5D4 at all. The RP is a much better camera than the youtube crowd would have you believe.

Great ergonomics and amazing picture quality. The RF 24-105 is an stunning lens (much better than my original EF v1 I stopped using long ago).
Just a really light, portable travel camera. Shadow push is still more than enough for most scenarios despite the DR nerdgasm raging that's been going on (I emphasis most because I do understand that for some rare cases that extra stop and a half is important to some people).

high ISO noise is not quite as nice as the 5D4, but definitely better than the fuji and m5.

Autofocus is fast and accurate. with an adapted 100-400 is was not as fast as the 5D4, but good enough. (maybe because of smaller battery on so much heavy glass? Other lenses were lightning fast)

They improved the already excellent 'touchscreen drag' focus from the m5 I was familiar with.

Battery life is... meh. I had to charge every night, but I only once had to switch a battery during a day of casual sightseeing and photography. Tweaking eco settings helped avoid it on following days. I also switched the strap connecting via the tripod mount - This prevented the back screen brushing against my shirt and keeping the screen on, killing batter fast (This is a problem I've found with all touchscreen mirrorless).

The USB-C was convenient - Fast quick charging from my MacBook charger without needing another charger. Very fast downloading of photos from the camera as well when plugging directly in to the laptop.

Years ago, I bought a Sony A7s - And was very dissatisfied with it. Turns out that the camera I wanted when I bought the A7s was actually the RP.

The 5D4 is undoubtedly a better camera, and for certain tasks it excels compared to the RP. But when it comes to casual travel or family snaps, the RP + 24-105 is just sooo much lighter and more compact.

I also took my fuji along - And didn't pull it out of my pack once. The RP + RF35 was compact enough that the times I would have left my 5D4 behind and taken the Fuji just didn't happen. I always reached the RP instead.

I'm also sitting here thinking very very carefully about whether I keep the 5D4. And even if I sell my fuji and all those lenses. I think that will depend on the quality and size of the 24-240. If the 24-240 is compact enough, and high quality to account for most of the size advantage of the Fuji + lenses, then I might just sell all those other cameras and keep just the RP. Those other cameras buy a lot of beautiful RF glass after all; and potentially whatever R camera comes next.
 
Reactions: Maximilian
Feb 27, 2019
54
15
My EVF is worthless for adjusting exposure. Even though its properly adjusted, everything appears blown out. I use the rear LCD to see the exposure. I'm taking shots so fast and lighting is constantly changing that adjusting exposures manually does not work. If I tap the subject on the LCD, it exposes perfectly unless its one of those really contrasty situations. Then I just adjust the compensation.
Alone, the EVF cannot be used to judge exposure, but... (at least on the R) you can get the histogram, and make informed judgement calls when going + or - over ride.

You can get a rough approximation of monochrome contrast rendition with the EVF. Also can a pretty darn good idea of the light's color correction in the EVF.

The EVF is great in low light. The EVF is great is super bright light too. Then again, I've got the R not the RP and... I didn't get to test the RP except in a big box store. It didn't play well with my glasses so I got the R instead.

And FWIW, the R is my go to. Smaller, lighter, focuses more accurately, very low "missed focus" percentage, viewfinder is the cats patootie for shooting stage acts.

I'm shooting everything from birds in my backyard, gritty biker venues, and grittier biker rallies, with occasional portraiture thrown into the mix (usually on location, at best a reflector or one flash for fill).
 

Jethro

EOS R
Jul 14, 2018
171
72
I use the histogram through the EVF as well, and between them I'm pretty happy with the exposure I'm getting. I particularly love being able to zoom through the EVF, to ensure focus is on the right detail.
 

Kit.

EOS 6D MK II
Apr 25, 2011
898
377
Most shots were with the 70-200. I'm still wading thru them, but I lost a lot of shots due to poor exposures, the R does better, since it does adjust exposure based on the AF point. Lots of dark areas plus a subject in a very bright spotlight really can fool the auto exposure if you are shooting wide. I don't always have time to switch to spot.
Do you have time to use the AE lock button and then reframe?
 

Quirkz

EOS 80D
Oct 30, 2014
101
31
Quirkz, how many photos were able to take on a full charge on the trip?
My days were casual. I was usually taking between 70-150 photos each day, and usually had plenty battery life left. When I pushed close to 150 shots, I found the battery tended to be around 25%. Battery life was also affected by the fact I would review & do a first pass at deleting photos I didn't like during the day while I had downtime on the camera itself.

The one day I needed to change the battery was the first day - After this I tweaked the eco settings to switch off the camera more quickly, and paid attention to whether it was on, gobbling charge while walking around due to accidentally brushing the back touchscreen. As I said, this is not an RP issue, it's an issue I've had with every mirrorless camera, especially those with touchscreens.

So, casual photography while sightseeing it's perfectly fine, you're going to get the 250 shot rating.
Even for the casual days, I always took a spare battery, even though I used it only once - that once was enough to convince me I needed.

It's a small battery, no getting around it; on a big, full frame and full featured power hungry mirrorless camera. It's got just enough charge to be acceptable.

If you're planning serious photo shoots with 200+ photos, then you're going through batteries. Probably an annoyance for a wedding photographer, for example. But for my casual street and travel photography it was absolutely fine.
 

koenkooi

EOS RP
Feb 25, 2015
265
127
My days were casual. I was usually taking between 70-150 photos each day, and usually had plenty battery life left. When I pushed close to 150 shots, I found the battery tended to be around 25%. Battery life was also affected by the fact I would review & do a first pass at deleting photos I didn't like during the day while I had downtime on the camera itself.

The one day I needed to change the battery was the first day - After this I tweaked the eco settings to switch off the camera more quickly, and paid attention to whether it was on, gobbling charge while walking around due to accidentally brushing the back touchscreen. As I said, this is not an RP issue, it's an issue I've had with every mirrorless camera, especially those with touchscreens.

So, casual photography while sightseeing it's perfectly fine, you're going to get the 250 shot rating.
Even for the casual days, I always took a spare battery, even though I used it only once - that once was enough to convince me I needed.

It's a small battery, no getting around it; on a big, full frame and full featured power hungry mirrorless camera. It's got just enough charge to be acceptable.

If you're planning serious photo shoots with 200+ photos, then you're going through batteries. Probably an annoyance for a wedding photographer, for example. But for my casual street and travel photography it was absolutely fine.
That is in line with what I have experienced, but there are some ways you can get better statistics. You can get a lot more photos on the card if you set it to high speed and take a burst of like 5 pictures every time. Last weekend I took 300 pictures using an IS lens and the battery was about half full after that. That was during a macro workshop, so I bet that will work out to 30-50 keepers.
 

JPAZ

If only I knew what I was doing.....
Sep 8, 2012
900
22
That is in line with what I have experienced, but there are some ways you can get better statistics. You can get a lot more photos on the card if you set it to high speed and take a burst of like 5 pictures every time. Last weekend I took 300 pictures using an IS lens and the battery was about half full after that. That was during a macro workshop, so I bet that will work out to 30-50 keepers.
I've got mine set to ECO. I leave the touchscreen closed unless I need it. I turn it off immediately (if I turn off the IS to save battery, I might not remember to turn it on so just turn off the camera) if I now I'll not be taking shots for a bit (probably not necessary since it "times out" on its own) and I do almost no crimping. I've taken over 350 shots with the RF 24-105 and have battery still available.

I do wish the IS would not stay "on" and maybe a future firmware upgrade will improve that.

I have 3 batteries 'cause 1 came with the camera and I had extras from my old M days. I am planning a trip and thinking about the RP instead of my 5Div. I'd bring the RF 24-105, the EF 16-35 and the EF 100-400 vii with the RF-EF adapter. What is anyone's experience with the EF + adapter and battery life? Assuming 200-300 shots a day (and that is likely more than I'd do) and 3 batteries, would I get a couple of days worth of images between charges?
 

Quirkz

EOS 80D
Oct 30, 2014
101
31
I've got mine set to ECO. I leave the touchscreen closed unless I need it. I turn it off immediately (if I turn off the IS to save battery, I might not remember to turn it on so just turn off the camera) if I now I'll not be taking shots for a bit (probably not necessary since it "times out" on its own) and I do almost no crimping. I've taken over 350 shots with the RF 24-105 and have battery still available.

I do wish the IS would not stay "on" and maybe a future firmware upgrade will improve that.

I have 3 batteries 'cause 1 came with the camera and I had extras from my old M days. I am planning a trip and thinking about the RP instead of my 5Div. I'd bring the RF 24-105, the EF 16-35 and the EF 100-400 vii with the RF-EF adapter. What is anyone's experience with the EF + adapter and battery life? Assuming 200-300 shots a day (and that is likely more than I'd do) and 3 batteries, would I get a couple of days worth of images between charges?
Hmmmmm. 3 battery’s over two days? Probably, if you didn’t chimp too much. Safer to plan on charging each night though. At least it’s quick and easy via usb c

I didn’t use my elf lenses much as the rf24-105 ended up stuck on the camera, but with what little I did, I didn’t see a change in battery life.