When do you actually use face detection AF?

Kit Lens Jockey

EOS 7D MK II
Nov 12, 2016
456
153
As everyone registers their indignation that the new firmware for the EOS R still doesn't allow eye detection AF in servo mode, honestly I'm not sure why I should care about this. Face/eye detection AF as a whole has never seemed consistent enough to me (on any camera) for me to feel like I can rely on it. I played with it a couple times on my EOS R, but immediately switched back to manual AF point selection the minute the camera started deciding someone's shirt looked like a face.

Yet everyone seems to be going crazy for face/eye detection. When are you actually using it? It always seemed too inconsistent for me in real world, dynamic situations (often misses faces or locks onto something that's not a face.) And in controlled portrait situations, why not just manually place a point on the person's eye to be sure it's correct?
 

Nelu

5D Mark IV, 1Dx
As everyone registers their indignation that the new firmware for the EOS R still doesn't allow eye detection AF in servo mode, honestly I'm not sure why I should care about this. Face/eye detection AF as a whole has never seemed consistent enough to me (on any camera) for me to feel like I can rely on it. I played with it a couple times on my EOS R, but immediately switched back to manual AF point selection the minute the camera started deciding someone's shirt looked like a face.

Yet everyone seems to be going crazy for face/eye detection. When are you actually using it? It always seemed too inconsistent for me in real world, dynamic situations (often misses faces or locks onto something that's not a face.) And in controlled portrait situations, why not just manually place a point on the person's eye to be sure it's correct?
First of all, I don't know how well it works anyways. OK, I can see the green rectangle it's there, on the eye, but does it really mean the eye is actually in focus?
Anyhow, I see a possible use for vacation-type selfies when you don't want to use a smartphone.
Other than that, not much use for it, not for me, because I mainly shoot sports, wildlife and landscapes.
 

PGSanta

EOS M50
Sep 5, 2018
29
10
San Diego, CA
As everyone registers their indignation that the new firmware for the EOS R still doesn't allow eye detection AF in servo mode, honestly I'm not sure why I should care about this. Face/eye detection AF as a whole has never seemed consistent enough to me (on any camera) for me to feel like I can rely on it. I played with it a couple times on my EOS R, but immediately switched back to manual AF point selection the minute the camera started deciding someone's shirt looked like a face.

Yet everyone seems to be going crazy for face/eye detection. When are you actually using it? It always seemed too inconsistent for me in real world, dynamic situations (often misses faces or locks onto something that's not a face.) And in controlled portrait situations, why not just manually place a point on the person's eye to be sure it's correct?
This reads to me like someone that's never tried Sony's system on the A7III or A9. It works on those cameras, and using it at events, or in candid portrait work is awesome; yes, it really works as advertised. Face detect on my EOS R is ok, eye AF sucks, but the R overall is simply much clunkier and slower than the Sonys. I'd kill for the same eye-AF and tracking ability on an EOS R.
 
Reactions: bokehmon22

Kit Lens Jockey

EOS 7D MK II
Nov 12, 2016
456
153
I played around with it when I had my A7 III. It was ok. Ultimately though, again, not something I'm going to trust for times when it matters. It's still not flawless when it comes to low light, angles of faces that aren't straight on, etc.

Until someone makes a face detect system that doesn't cost me shots because it can't figure out what a face is and isn't. under any conditions, I'm going to be hesitant to use it. So I can't understand why so many people are fixated on such a flawed feature.
 
Reactions: Talys

PGSanta

EOS M50
Sep 5, 2018
29
10
San Diego, CA
I played around with it when I had my A7 III. It was ok. Ultimately though, again, not something I'm going to trust for times when it matters. It's still not flawless when it comes to low light, angles of faces that aren't straight on, etc.

Until someone makes a face detect system that doesn't cost me shots because it can't figure out what a face is and isn't. under any conditions, I'm going to be hesitant to use it. So I can't understand why so many people are fixated on such a flawed feature.
Yeahhhhh.... don’t know what to tell you. Your experience with Sony’s system isn’t mine, and sounds like you were using adapted glass or something. With native glass, and an A7III, or A9 the system is almost flawless, even in dim light, with covered faces, angles, whatever. The A7RIII lags a little behind, but even it is really good.
 

Mt Spokane Photography

I post too Much on Here!!
Mar 25, 2011
15,164
474
Face detection + eye is coming, Canon has affirmed that. It will likely bee here by the end of March, within 2 months is what one reviewer stated after a talk with Canon.

So, the feature upgrades are on their way, Canon pushed out bug fixes first.
 

SereneSpeed

EOS T7i
Feb 1, 2016
77
22
I don’t use it for professional work for still images. I do use it professionally for video and it’s outstanding! Video is only a small part of my work, but I rely on it for 80% if what I do.

For stills, I only use it to chase my children, or shoot family because it’s only one shot AF and movement means missed images. I make up for that by taking lots of images (unprofessional for paid work). But it works very well. I constantly move the user controllable guide over the face I want to focus on to ‘help’ the system. That’s all I have to do. Then the eyes are in focus a shockingly high percentage of the time (with f1.8-1.4).

I hope to use it professionally once it’s available in Servo AF.