Canon Wins Patent for Its ‘Shoulda Coulda’ Supertelephoto Designs

tarjei99

EOS M6 Mark II
Dec 27, 2013
57
39
Have you used current Sony, Nikon and Canon cameras, and compared the animal-eye AF directly between them, shooting the same subjects, under identical conditions, with the same equivalent focal lengths and apertures?

If not, that's a pretty wild claim to make.


Mike Lane (
) have compared the OM-1 with the 150-400mm with a Sony A1 with the 200-600mm. He says that the OM-1 has more out of focus images in a series than the A1, but it gives him more sharp images than the A1. Mainly because the OM-1 is shooting at 50 FPS. The ability to capture images before the shutter is pressed appears to be valuable.
 

entoman

wildlife photography
May 8, 2015
884
1,010
UK
Mike Lane (
) have compared the OM-1 with the 150-400mm with a Sony A1 with the 200-600mm. He says that the OM-1 has more out of focus images in a series than the A1, but it gives him more sharp images than the A1. Mainly because the OM-1 is shooting at 50 FPS. The ability to capture images before the shutter is pressed appears to be valuable.
Yes, IMO the biggest advantage of OMD/Olympus is the pre-capture facility which would be extremely useful for subjects where timing of the perfect moment can't be easily predicted (e.g. when a bird or insect takes off from its perch).

I really wish this feature would find it's way into FF cameras, but it requires very fast readout, large buffers, powerful processors and long-lasting batteries, so I don't think it's likely to happen.

I use FF cameras, but to be honest I think it's just a passing phase in photography. I think the future lies with smaller formats, which allow faster fps, in-camera focus-stack merging (as opposed to having to merge in post), and lots of potential advantages for computational photography. The limiting factor is megapixels. M43 can currently only get to 25MP and APS-C can only get to 33MP at the moment.

But I'm not getting into a megapixel or format discusion, as I've already done so several times....

People have *very* fixed ideas about which format, brand or megapixel count is "best" ;)
 

koenkooi

EOS 5D Mark IV
CR Pro
Feb 25, 2015
2,020
1,990
Yes, IMO the biggest advantage of OMD/Olympus is the pre-capture facility which would be extremely useful for subjects where timing of the perfect moment can't be easily predicted (e.g. when a bird or insect takes off from its perch).

I really wish this feature would find it's way into FF cameras, but it requires very fast readout, large buffers, powerful processors and long-lasting batteries, so I don't think it's likely to happen.[..]
I tried using it on my M6II, but the rolling shutter was too severe for my use case and even with fast SD cards the buffer is very tiny. The crop and drop in bitdepth didn't bother me that much, but the whole DPP4 dance needed made it unworkable for me. You can't say "Take this bundle, extract all frames", you have to go into the frame selector and export them one by one.
An in-camera option to save the bundle as separate (C)RAWs would be a big improvement.
 

mbike999

EOS M50
Jan 18, 2018
42
86
Bay Area
Have you used current Sony, Nikon and Canon cameras, and compared the animal-eye AF directly between them, shooting the same subjects, under identical conditions, with the same equivalent focal lengths and apertures?

If not, that's a pretty wild claim to make.
Well I own a Z9 and my partner has an R3. Haven't used the A1 but haven't seen anything suggesting it is miles better than the other two.