Do you have an RRS L-bracket for the R5 or R6 pre-ordered?

JustMeOregon

EOS 90D
Sep 10, 2013
163
8
If you pre-ordered a Really Right Stuff L-bracket for the new R5 (or R6) you may wanna confirm its status... I spoke with RRS Customer Service earlier today, and they confirmed that the 2-part "modular" design and the original "ultralight" versions of the L-bracket will not be produced. He said that there will only be a single version produced & sold -- one where the vertical (side) component of the L-bracket will slide out to accommodate cables & such... He further stated that customers who pre-ordered the now discontinued L-brackets should have already received an email explaining the situation & their options. Unfortunately, I was not one of those lucky customers and my email got lost in the ether of the internet... In all fairness, he was upfront, nice, & understanding as I explained to him that I really didn't care that much about the specific design of the L-bracket (I've accumulated enough RRS-gear over the years to be comfortable with their designs & quality). But what I was most concerned about, having placed my pre-order more than 2 months ago, was losing my place on the waiting-list... He assured me that would not happen and processed the order change. Also, for what it's worth, I asked him about when they would actually start to ship, and he said that his guesstimate would be in a couple of weeks...

Also, if you've pre-ordered one of the RRS L-brackets (for the R5/R6) from B&H, be advised that they have changed the description & price... And that B&H is now saying "Expected availability: Nov 02, 2020."
 
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HeavyPiper

6D Mark II
CR Pro
Aug 1, 2018
38
24
70
Love my RRS. Looking at their web page, nice looking L plate. Now I just need to save my $$$ for my R5
 

jdavidse

R5
CR Pro
Sep 13, 2012
98
84
I was one. RRS has become a complete joke for Canon RF shooters. They did the same thing for the R, which felt lazy. I bought the base plate only just so I had a basic plate and also I use the QD swivels, so I needed that. But to this day I don't own an L for the R because the design is stupid. But it was ok because the R was my secondary camera. The 5DIV had a sweet modular plate, and I owned both the gripped and non gripped versions.

Now they pull the same crap for Canon's flagship mirrorless R5. You can either use the screen and have no L bracket or have an L bracket and not use your screen. There are now officially zero options now for 1. Modular L plate and 2. Mil-spec QD sockets. I had my preorder through B&H, where I really got screwed over.

They also, despite offering the same product as the R, have increased the price of the base plate from $55 to $70 and the L plate from $140 to $180. Meanwhile if you own a Sony, you can buy a sweet modular plate with full battery/finger coverage, modular design and 2 QD sockets for only 10 bucks more.

I'm really undecided on what to do. I have a ton of money invested in Really Right Stuff plates across 2 different systems. I also have 3 different straps setup with QD hardware. Kirk is no better- basically the same design. I could switch to ProMedia Gear, but I would have to change to their swivel and I really don't like that part.
 
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Mt Spokane Photography

I post too Much on Here!!
CR Pro
Mar 25, 2011
16,283
1,318
I once bought a cheap $5 universal L bracket for a SL2. I tried it on my EOS R and could adjust it enough to clear the LCD so it could swing out. The construction was actually pretty nice, so I used it up until I bought a grip. I'd bet it will work for a R5 as well. We'll see if mine ever arrives. I'll probably get a grip, but I'm not buying accessories until the camera is in hand.
 
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koenkooi

EOS R
CR Pro
Feb 25, 2015
1,328
1,117
Does this look any good?

Mine was delivered yesterday, it is very well made, on par with my other smallrig brackets. It is sitting next to the BG-R10, spare batteries, CFe card and CFe reader, awaiting delivery of an R5. So I can't say how it fits on the camera.
I ordered it directly from smallrig.com to get it laser engraved, the estimated '5 weeks' for lead time was 6 days and it took a week to go from China to my desk.
 

YuengLinger

Sufficiently Pixilated
CR Pro
Dec 20, 2012
3,036
1,321
USA
Mine was delivered yesterday, it is very well made, on par with my other smallrig brackets. It is sitting next to the BG-R10, spare batteries, CFe card and CFe reader, awaiting delivery of an R5. So I can't say how it fits on the camera.
I ordered it directly from smallrig.com to get it laser engraved, the estimated '5 weeks' for lead time was 6 days and it took a week to go from China to my desk.
Have you used this brand with RRS ball-heads? My biggest concern is how securely it gets locked in. If RRS had produced a modular-L plate as good as the one for the 80D, I probably wouldn't even be shopping around.

But, like others, I'm not thrilled with what they made for the R. It works, it does what's most important in terms of staying securely locked into the ball-head clamp, but the 5DIV and 80D versions spoiled me with the modular design and the carrying space for a hex-wrench.
 
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koenkooi

EOS R
CR Pro
Feb 25, 2015
1,328
1,117
Have you used this brand with RRS ball-heads? My biggest concern is how securely it gets locked in. If RRS had produced a modular-L plate as good as the one for the 80D, I probably wouldn't even be shopping around.

But, like others, I'm not thrilled with what they made for the R. It works, it does what's most important in terms of staying securely locked into the ball-head clamp, but the 5DIV and 80D versions spoiled me with the modular design and the carrying space for a hex-wrench.
I haven't used any RRS gear, so I can't say how security the smallrig on locks into the clamp.
 

BeenThere

EOS R
CR Pro
Sep 4, 2012
1,196
615
Eastern Shore
Have you used this brand with RRS ball-heads? My biggest concern is how securely it gets locked in. If RRS had produced a modular-L plate as good as the one for the 80D, I probably wouldn't even be shopping around.

But, like others, I'm not thrilled with what they made for the R. It works, it does what's most important in terms of staying securely locked into the ball-head clamp, but the 5DIV and 80D versions spoiled me with the modular design and the carrying space for a hex-wrench.
I have the small rig modular L-Bracket on my R5 and it fits perfectly. Also, no issues on my RRS ball head. The R5 rear screen flips out nicely. On a different ball head there is some interference with the ballhead Arca tightening knob when flipping the rear screen from facing front to facing rear. But, not an issue with RRS head with the tightening screw (at least on mine — may be different versions out there). Lots of attachment points on the Smallrig bracket too (1/4-20 holes).
 
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TominNJ

EOS M6 Mark II
Mar 14, 2015
72
62
I’ll look at the Kirk one after I get my camera and decide if I need the battery grip.
 

YuengLinger

Sufficiently Pixilated
CR Pro
Dec 20, 2012
3,036
1,321
USA
I did get a reply from RRS regarding the R5 L-plate: "For the R5, we took a little longer to release this plate because of some design changes that make this plate unique. It will still allow you to move the L plate away from the camera body to allow for tethered shooting in portrait orientation. It is still of the same build quality but we understand if you feel the need to go in a different direction."

I don't understand this reply, as I was asking them to explain why the R5 plate isn't modular. So it goes.

I have trusted the quality of RRS plates for years, but the company is not as friendly, responsive, and innovative lately, IMO.

I know that SmallRig is becoming better known, but I wonder how good their aluminum is. From what I understand, SmallRig is a Chinese brand. They are competing aggressively on price. Having lived in China for years, and knowing the range of quality-control, I'd like to find out more before trusting them with R5 and lens...
 

BeenThere

EOS R
CR Pro
Sep 4, 2012
1,196
615
Eastern Shore
I did get a reply from RRS regarding the R5 L-plate: "For the R5, we took a little longer to release this plate because of some design changes that make this plate unique. It will still allow you to move the L plate away from the camera body to allow for tethered shooting in portrait orientation. It is still of the same build quality but we understand if you feel the need to go in a different direction."

I don't understand this reply, as I was asking them to explain why the R5 plate isn't modular. So it goes.

I have trusted the quality of RRS plates for years, but the company is not as friendly, responsive, and innovative lately, IMO.

I know that SmallRig is becoming better known, but I wonder how good their aluminum is. From what I understand, SmallRig is a Chinese brand. They are competing aggressively on price. Having lived in China for years, and knowing the range of quality-control, I'd like to find out more before trusting them with R5 and lens...
I have and use the SmallRig L-Bracket for R5. IMO the machining and design are excellent. I can’t speak to the aluminum alloy they use, but seriously doubt it will be problematic. My one minor issue is that the captured screw that is used for the camera attachment and the slide adjustment screw are slot screws rather that a cap screw type (with allen wrench hole) that I prefer. The other screws are Allen drive type. My guess for why they did this is because of the wide head of this particular screw. And yes, the price for the SmallRig is very good.
 
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privatebydesign

Garfield is back...
CR Pro
Jan 29, 2011
9,061
3,176
120
My opinion of RRS has fallen off a cliff in the last couple of years. For years they led in design and build quality but now others seem more innovative and have upped their production methods and quality to rival the best at much lower prices.

I paid $250 for the modular RRS plate for the 1DX II, they say was redesigned for the II yet it is the same as the 1DX I, even though the remote socket is in a completely different location! The only change is they added recievers for their dumb strap option.

The 1DX III RRS L-Plate has a couple of stupid design flaws I told them about before they finalized design and went to manufacture but they did nothing. Meanwhile the Kirk 1DX III L-Plate design is better and stronger, has more features and is cheaper!

At first glance of the SmallRig plate for the R5 I wrongly assumed it was a universal style bracket, as soon as I realized it had the anti rotation pins on it I decided when I get an R5 it will be the model I get. I have other SmallRig gear and find it well made and innovative and the prices just can’t be beaten.
 

jdavidse

R5
CR Pro
Sep 13, 2012
98
84
I did get a reply from RRS regarding the R5 L-plate: "For the R5, we took a little longer to release this plate because of some design changes that make this plate unique. It will still allow you to move the L plate away from the camera body to allow for tethered shooting in portrait orientation. It is still of the same build quality but we understand if you feel the need to go in a different direction."

I don't understand this reply, as I was asking them to explain why the R5 plate isn't modular. So it goes.

I have trusted the quality of RRS plates for years, but the company is not as friendly, responsive, and innovative lately, IMO.

I know that SmallRig is becoming better known, but I wonder how good their aluminum is. From what I understand, SmallRig is a Chinese brand. They are competing aggressively on price. Having lived in China for years, and knowing the range of quality-control, I'd like to find out more before trusting them with R5 and lens...
So it sounds like they threw the entire screen functionality out the window so that a small amount of photographers can tether their camera in portrait mode?
 

YuengLinger

Sufficiently Pixilated
CR Pro
Dec 20, 2012
3,036
1,321
USA
So it sounds like they threw the entire screen functionality out the window so that a small amount of photographers can tether their camera in portrait mode?
The EOS R 's RRS L-bracket did allow the screen to swing out and to tilt fairly well, but, of course, the screen wouldn't work facing towards the subject/vlogger. Unfortunately this "functionality" came with some risk of crushing the right side of the screen if it got pushed into the L-bracket's gap. Not a brilliant design, imo.

But what irritates me now about RRS is their attitude. Basically they told me go find another brand if I don't like their design. There was no need for that. They could have just explained why they decided not to go modular with the R5.
 

YuengLinger

Sufficiently Pixilated
CR Pro
Dec 20, 2012
3,036
1,321
USA
Update: I fb messaged RRS customer service, and the department's manager wrote back in an informative and friendly reply:

"...Your question about the R5 design direction is completely valid. There are a lot of points that go into a decision like this, but I'll try to provide as much insight as I can. First and foremost, our ultralight plates typically have more interest from customers than modular plates, both in terms of pre-release questions, and overall sales. For this reason, we made the decision to incorporate most of the features of our usual ultralight design into the final L-plate design.

Secondly, with COVID complicating the production environment/supply chain, making a unibody plate for a flagship camera was and remains something that could be delivered on in a reasonable timeframe, whereas we've seen other modular plates we've introduced in the COVID era be vulnerable to unplanned delays.

Thirdly, screen articulation with this plate has been expanded to a degree felt able to accommodate most shooting styles with this plate, by our team. There are other factors, but these are the most relevant.

That said, we are always listening to our customers, and we are taking in all feedback about this design in particular, from all corners. This is the first flagship camera to utilize a fully articulating screen, at least that I can recall, and if we missed the mark, we want our customers to let us know, so we fully invite this kind of feedback. We sincerely appreciate you taking the time to express your concerns
..."

I'll rethink--once my R5 arrives--whether or not the sliding, single piece works for me, or the modular truly offers an advantage in portrait studio and tethering use. (It would be great to hear others' experience.) I will also do some research about the QC of competitors, because if I do end up getting an R6 too, the higher costs add up!

In any event, I believe RRS is trying to stay on track in a difficult time. Competing against ultra low-cost labor in other countries, some of which enforce no worker safety or environmental regulations, isn't easy for anybody trying to manufacture in the USA.
 
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jdavidse

R5
CR Pro
Sep 13, 2012
98
84
Update: I fb messaged RRS customer service, and the department's manager wrote back in an informative and friendly reply:

"...Your question about the R5 design direction is completely valid. There are a lot of points that go into a decision like this, but I'll try to provide as much insight as I can. First and foremost, our ultralight plates typically have more interest from customers than modular plates, both in terms of pre-release questions, and overall sales. For this reason, we made the decision to incorporate most of the features of our usual ultralight design into the final L-plate design.

Secondly, with COVID complicating the production environment/supply chain, making a unibody plate for a flagship camera was and remains something that could be delivered on in a reasonable timeframe, whereas we've seen other modular plates we've introduced in the COVID era be vulnerable to unplanned delays.

Thirdly, screen articulation with this plate has been expanded to a degree felt able to accommodate most shooting styles with this plate, by our team. There are other factors, but these are the most relevant.

That said, we are always listening to our customers, and we are taking in all feedback about this design in particular, from all corners. This is the first flagship camera to utilize a fully articulating screen, at least that I can recall, and if we missed the mark, we want our customers to let us know, so we fully invite this kind of feedback. We sincerely appreciate you taking the time to express your concerns
..."

I'll rethink--once my R5 arrives--whether or not the sliding, single piece works for me, or the modular truly offers an advantage in portrait studio and tethering use. (It would be great to hear others' experience.) I will also do some research about the QC of competitors, because if I do end up getting an R6 too, the higher costs add up!

In any event, I believe RRS is trying to stay on track in a difficult time. Competing against ultra low-cost labor in other countries, some of which enforce no worker safety or environmental regulations, isn't easy for anybody trying to manufacture in the USA.
It's good they at least say they are being receptive to feedback. But I really don't buy their answer about COVID causing them to completely change course. There are dozens of other cameras that you can buy a modular design for. Once designed, they just churn these out on a CNC machine. It's not like waiting for the machined to make an L-bracket is much different than waiting on it to make a 2 piece design. (Also, they would sell more of those imagine that!)

There is something else they are not telling us here. I personally believe that nobody there really uses an L bracket the way some of us do. They see the L bracket primarily as a tripod mount, for say landscape or architecture, where you have plenty of time to set up and fiddle with the screen. By saying "screen articulation with this plate has been expanded to a degree felt able to accommodate most shooting styles with this plate, by our team" they are telegraphing that they do not use their screen in a portrait or event environment, where every movement of the camera, screen or lens has to be efficient and swift. Also, using this bracket in such an environment would cause damage to the screen, which they clearly have never thought of. The only acceptable "degree of articulation" is 100%.

I used to have my L bracket on all the time with the 5DIV. That's because it doesn't have an articulated screen. It was always there- I believe it improves handling, adds protection, provides dual QD sockets, and lastly is always ready for the tripod. But with articulated screens, times have changed. I will be getting the base plate from them and no more. I'm not sure what my portrait orientation solution will be yet.
 
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YuengLinger

Sufficiently Pixilated
CR Pro
Dec 20, 2012
3,036
1,321
USA
It's good they at least say they are being receptive to feedback. But I really don't buy their answer about COVID causing them to completely change course. There are dozens of other cameras that you can buy a modular design for. Once designed, they just churn these out on a CNC machine. It's not like waiting for the machined to make an L-bracket is much different than waiting on it to make a 2 piece design. (Also, they would sell more of those imagine that!)

There is something else they are not telling us here. I personally believe that nobody there really uses an L bracket the way some of us do. They see the L bracket primarily as a tripod mount, for say landscape or architecture, where you have plenty of time to set up and fiddle with the screen. By saying "screen articulation with this plate has been expanded to a degree felt able to accommodate most shooting styles with this plate, by our team" they are telegraphing that they do not use their screen in a portrait or event environment, where every movement of the camera, screen or lens has to be efficient and swift. Also, using this bracket in such an environment would cause damage to the screen, which they clearly have never thought of. The only acceptable "degree of articulation" is 100%.

I used to have my L bracket on all the time with the 5DIV. That's because it doesn't have an articulated screen. It was always there- I believe it improves handling, adds protection, provides dual QD sockets, and lastly is always ready for the tripod. But with articulated screens, times have changed. I will be getting the base plate from them and no more. I'm not sure what my portrait orientation solution will be yet.
With the R, after about one year of use, I've only had trouble with the screen position with very low shooting (when I need it most!), generally for macros. Otherwise, the limitation hasn't been a problem--but I don't vlog! I might want to be shooting over my head, but, with Covid, I haven't had events to try group shots this way at events.

But I have to think hard...Am I going to, in the field, actually go to the trouble of removing the side bracket from a modular design? Not sure, but I never once did with my 5DIV. But why would I? It didn't have a flippy-screen!

I'm planning to start working with tethering for portraits, as my lighting setups have gotten more elaborate, and I really need to see shadows on a monitor. Would sliding the whole L-bracket out be practical? Doesn't seem so, but I will be experimenting with my R this week.

(And, completely off topic, I have to start getting my hard drives cleaned up and organized to make space for the MASSIVE file loads I'm expecting with the elusive but sure to come R5.)