DPAF for Macro

DanP

EOS M6 Mark II
CR Pro
Dec 8, 2014
62
13
I have a 5D III and EF100 f2.8L Macro IS lens. I find (as most people probably do) that autofocus becomes less accurate the closer I get to minimum focus distance. Does DPAF give more accurate results than normal AF at close distances?
 

Mt Spokane Photography

I post too Much on Here!!
CR Pro
Mar 25, 2011
16,264
1,301
Do DPAF at about 50X the focal length. Its not going to help doing it at mfd or close to that. Use contrast detect in live view for AF if you really want to try AF near 1:1.

If handheld, set the manual focus to focus as best you can then move the camera back or forward a tiny amount to get best focus. I've done it handheld, but I've also braced myself as best I could, and its still difficult.

If on a tripod, contrast detect may work.
 

DanP

EOS M6 Mark II
CR Pro
Dec 8, 2014
62
13
Mt Spokane Photography said:
Do DPAF at about 50X the focal length. Its not going to help doing it at mfd or close to that. Use contrast detect in live view for AF if you really want to try AF near 1:1.

If handheld, set the manual focus to focus as best you can then move the camera back or forward a tiny amount to get best focus. I've done it handheld, but I've also braced myself as best I could, and its still difficult.

If on a tripod, contrast detect may work.
Thanks Mt. Spokane - I'll give a try the next time I try macro.
 

slclick

Cyclist, photog, drummer & sardonic haiku writer
Dec 17, 2013
4,156
2,144
Focusing rails are your friend. I love my Novoflex Castel Q rack. Pricey but indispensable.
 

Zeidora

EOS RP
Feb 15, 2015
668
10
Get a matt focusing screen and focus manually; or more accurately, set magnification with focus ring, then move body back and forth to place focus where YOU want it. Can be done hand-held with practice. Focusing rail is another option, though slower. I recently got a Hejnar 5-series and quite happy with it, particularly the lack of slack and lateral movement when reversing direction.
 

slclick

Cyclist, photog, drummer & sardonic haiku writer
Dec 17, 2013
4,156
2,144
Zeidora said:
Get a matt focusing screen and focus manually; or more accurately, set magnification with focus ring, then move body back and forth to place focus where YOU want it. Can be done hand-held with practice. Focusing rail is another option, though slower. I recently got a Hejnar 5-series and quite happy with it, particularly the lack of slack and lateral movement when reversing direction.
Sorry, focusing screens aren't available for the Mark 3. Oh and camera shake from handheld will always show on that tight of a shot, rails are amazing.
 

Zeidora

EOS RP
Feb 15, 2015
668
10
slclick said:
Zeidora said:
Get a matt focusing screen and focus manually; or more accurately, set magnification with focus ring, then move body back and forth to place focus where YOU want it. Can be done hand-held with practice. Focusing rail is another option, though slower. I recently got a Hejnar 5-series and quite happy with it, particularly the lack of slack and lateral movement when reversing direction.
Sorry, focusing screens aren't available for the Mark 3. Oh and camera shake from handheld will always show on that tight of a shot, rails are amazing.
focusingscreen.com makes matt focusing screens for the 5D3. Not too difficult to switch out, did it on my 5DsR.

Re handheld, no problem with flash. or keep exposure time well shorter than 1/200s and it is fine with a bit of practice. As always, not every shot will work, but shoot enough, and you'll have some keepers.

Rails are good for some applications, but not all. Good luck shooting jumping spiders with a rail. I have several, including the motorized StackShot, but sometimes I shoot hand held with 100 MP / 180L / MPE 65 macros.
 

slclick

Cyclist, photog, drummer & sardonic haiku writer
Dec 17, 2013
4,156
2,144
Zeidora said:
slclick said:
Zeidora said:
Get a matt focusing screen and focus manually; or more accurately, set magnification with focus ring, then move body back and forth to place focus where YOU want it. Can be done hand-held with practice. Focusing rail is another option, though slower. I recently got a Hejnar 5-series and quite happy with it, particularly the lack of slack and lateral movement when reversing direction.
Sorry, focusing screens aren't available for the Mark 3. Oh and camera shake from handheld will always show on that tight of a shot, rails are amazing.
focusingscreen.com makes matt focusing screens for the 5D3. Not too difficult to switch out, did it on my 5DsR.

Re handheld, no problem with flash. or keep exposure time well shorter than 1/200s and it is fine with a bit of practice. As always, not every shot will work, but shoot enough, and you'll have some keepers.

Rails are good for some applications, but not all. Good luck shooting jumping spiders with a rail. I have several, including the motorized StackShot, but sometimes I shoot hand held with 100 MP / 180L / MPE 65 macros.
I agree about spiders, I guess since I don't shoot moving macro, yeah you got me but the 5D3 and the screen? that's not 'average' user serviceable. Is the S/R line the same? And you did the surgery yourself? Then I am impressed.
 

Zeidora

EOS RP
Feb 15, 2015
668
10
slclick said:
Zeidora said:
slclick said:
Zeidora said:
Get a matt focusing screen and focus manually; or more accurately, set magnification with focus ring, then move body back and forth to place focus where YOU want it. Can be done hand-held with practice. Focusing rail is another option, though slower. I recently got a Hejnar 5-series and quite happy with it, particularly the lack of slack and lateral movement when reversing direction.
Sorry, focusing screens aren't available for the Mark 3. Oh and camera shake from handheld will always show on that tight of a shot, rails are amazing.
focusingscreen.com makes matt focusing screens for the 5D3. Not too difficult to switch out, did it on my 5DsR.

Re handheld, no problem with flash. or keep exposure time well shorter than 1/200s and it is fine with a bit of practice. As always, not every shot will work, but shoot enough, and you'll have some keepers.

Rails are good for some applications, but not all. Good luck shooting jumping spiders with a rail. I have several, including the motorized StackShot, but sometimes I shoot hand held with 100 MP / 180L / MPE 65 macros.
I agree about spiders, I guess since I don't shoot moving macro, yeah you got me but the 5D3 and the screen? that's not 'average' user serviceable. Is the S/R line the same? And you did the surgery yourself? Then I am impressed.
Re average user, well, it really is not that hard. There are some youtube videos out there. When I got my preordered 5DsR, I was under the impression that the viewfinder is the same as that of the 5D3, but it isn't. So had to cut down the focusingscreen.com 5D3 screen with a single edged razor to make it fit the 5DsR. That was a bit fiddly. Now there is a dedicated 5Ds/R screen, because I sent focusing screens my 5DsR stock screen I removed so that they could make one for the new model. The exchange procedure is pretty much the same, i.e., not 5D2 or 1-series-like.

I guess you could go to a camera repair place and ask them to put the screen in for you.