Is a Canon EOS R7 Mark II coming this year? [CR2]

Dragon

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May 29, 2019
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While I would appreciate Rf-S variants of the EF-M 22 and 32, the current 16/28/50 FF RF lenses are very small, affordable and have decent IQ. I suspect Canon thinks they have that market covered with those lenses.

If I start using an RF-S camera, I would wish the most for a modern variant of the Ef-S 60mm macro lens.

I know that a lot of online commentators think that using a FF lens on an APS-C camera is equivalent to getting waterboarded, but those people need to grow up and start taking actual pictures.
There also seems to be a penchant among those commentators to hang on to specific focal lengths as if they had been dipped in holy water. With short primes, the use case difference is simply stepping back or forward a few feet if you have a different focal length. A perfect example is the 16mm. You can find endless dissertations on the pros and cons of 24 vs 28 (FF equivalent) in discussions of cameras like the Ricoh GR, so what is wrong with 25.6 mm? that pretty much splits the argument down the middle. In the end, trolls are very annoying.
 
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Hell Yeah!

The R7 is clearly not the best Canon could have built in terms of mirrorless APS-C. The 32,5MP Sensor is actually taken from the 90D and has a slow readout. The lack of a vertical grip mount is one of the top three reasons people do not like her that much. And it makes sense - a flagship camera needs the ability for accessories like a battery grip.

So if they want to attack Fuji's XT-5 with a fast 40MP sensor, they need to develop it. My guess on realistic specs for the R7 II:

35-40MP stacked BSI Sensor (much faster readout, better low-light performance)
15 fps mechanical
40-50 fps electronic
newest AF (what a surprise)
6K @ 60fps
4K @ 120fps (crop)
up to 4K @ 60fps oversampled from 6-7K
1080p @ 180/240 fps (?)
6 to 8 stops IBIS
new multiangle LCD, like it is likely to come on the R5 II (same size, same resolution)
most likely a new processor: DIGIC X II /DIGIC XI
hopefully we get a successor to the EF-S 17-55mm f2.8 IS USM (--> RF-S 16-60mm f2.8 IS USM)
a better EVF, 4-6MP
ISO down to 50/64?


if there will be no R7C comming, then the R7 II gets:
RAW Video (10/12-bit Video)
8K capabilites (yes, we need at least 38MP for that)
Canon Log 2 and 3
Dual ISO (100/1600)
hopefully a full HDMI output


An announcement would be plausible between April and September, with a market start between June and October.

As said, these are my more or less realistic guesses. Let me know your thoughts on to this.

A personal note: I use a 77D and a 90D with 17-55mm f2.8 and 70-200mm f2.8. My step into the mirrorless system would be the R7, but the lack of a battery grip and the slower sensor gives me hope for a R7 II this year... INCLUDING a fast zoom lense for APS-C, but we will see. If not lets hope that Sigma gives us the acess to their lenses for RF/RF-S
I'll start saving for my £3k now then :)
 
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Canon currently have some of the best mirrorless full frame cameras in the market, and are about to launch new designs which will only increase their current market share. In 2022, Canon launched the EOS R7 a great APS-C mirrorless feature rich camera, which many photographers turned to for wildlife photography. However, this current R7 design is up against strong competition from Fujifilm APS-C range, especially against their X-H2s, also released in 2022. If Canon were to make some improvements to the current EOS R7 camera along the lines of, Stacked Sensor, Improved Storage (CFexpress + UHS II SD Card) along with an improved EVF (3.69M dot) inline with the EOS R6, what a camera they would have in the APS-C market space. I do not really understand why Canon did not bring out the R7 in 2022 without the improved features indicated above, as they must have been aware of what Fujifilm were likely to do with their camera designs in the APS-C market space. With the current features the camera already has, along with some design improvements indicated above, there is no doubt that Canon would also increase their market share in the APS-C market place. So Canon, please let me know when you are likely to release such a design, and I will arrange to pre-order straight away. I am sure my fellow EOS R7 owners will agree !!!
 
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I hope the R7 II is an improvement. As a 7DII user I was hoping to see at least the same concept used for the R7, such as compatibility with the R5 controls, a PC socket, battery grip and compass/GPS among other things. As it was, it appeared to me to be, as someone else posted, an R90. I'd jsust started using the PC switch to trigger additional flashguns by wire on the 7DII but the R5 is the only body with it (though I expect the R3 and R1 has/will have).
Not all of us can afford to replace several flashguns for new radio controlled ones.
I'd settle for an R7 body looking like an R6 II which is my current plan, but I'm holding off to see what the 7II looks like.
 
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I bought the R7 when it was released in 2022 and its a good camera. However, it is time for this camera to be upgraded to match competition in the APS-C market such as the Fuji X-H2s. As a wildlife photographer, having the extra reach of the APS-C sensor is a great feature to have, and the R7 could be upgraded (as per the rumours of the R7 Mark II) to be a great camera. One of the main issues is the read speed which cause \"rolling shutter\", this could be improved in the R7 Mark II by introducing a stacked sensor. Canon is already using this technology in the R3, and I am sure this feature will be in the new R5 Mark II and the R1 when released. OK, so that would be the full frame sector covered, so isn\'t it time to upgrade Canon\'s flagship APS-C camera (EOS R7), and bring this into line with other cameras in Canon\'s range, to give photographers the flexible choice right across the range of full frame & APS-C. Obviously this would increase the cost of the R7, to give the additional features as Stacked Sensor / Upgraded storage to include CF express card / upgraded EVF in line with R6 Mark II 3.69M dot, but any photographer who has already invested in the Canon range, would certainly look to make this upgrade to the R7 Mark II.
 
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koenkooi

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Feb 25, 2015
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I bought the R7 when it was released in 2022 and its a good camera. However, it is time for this camera to be upgraded to match competition in the APS-C market such as the Fuji X-H2s.[...]
Here in .nl I can buy a new R7 for €1250, the X-H2s would be €1900. That's a lot more money for a lot fewer megapixels! I'm not sure how many actual people will be considering both when trying to pick their future camera. You'd be comparing an R7+RF100-400 against a lensless X-H2s at that price point.
 
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Here in .nl I can buy a new R7 for €1250, the X-H2s would be €1900. That's a lot more money for a lot fewer megapixels! I'm not sure how many actual people will be considering both when trying to pick their future camera. You'd be comparing an R7+RF100-400 against a lensless X-H2s at that price point.
I would not expect an R7 Mark II to stay at its current price point, but I do believe that an APS-C camera with upgraded specifications in the Canon range would be attractive to many photographers. If this price point would be too high for some people then there would always be the option of the original R7 (as per the R6 / R6 Mark II + R5 / R5 Mark II)
 
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Jul 21, 2010
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I would not expect an R7 Mark II to stay at its current price point, but I do believe that an APS-C camera with upgraded specifications in the Canon range would be attractive to many photographers.
Historically, Canon has not placed much emphasis on 'high-end' APS-C. The 7-series has been on the slowest upgrade cycle of any line, there's only been one constant-aperture zoom (17-55/2.8) and that came early and was never updated. Only two 'fast' primes, and both of those were EF-M. The RF-S offerings have followed the trend of getting even slower apertures than their EF-S predecessors, and while I understand that Canon is designing to a budget point for the APS-C R system, the RF-S 18-45 is a 'worst-of-both-worlds' kit lens from a top-line spec standpoint.

There's some hope, in that the market overall is shifting slowly to higher end bodies. However, that cuts both ways – it's in Canon's best interests to push people to FF bodies and lenses, and 'affordable' lenses like the RF 100-400, 600/11 and 800/11 help encourage people to use FF over APS-C.
 
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SereneSpeed

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Feb 1, 2016
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[…]'affordable' lenses like the RF 100-400, 600/11 and 800/11 help encourage people to use FF over APS-C.
I agree with what you’ve written, but I’m not sure I follow the last part. Those three lenses are for (more) affordable ‘reach’. I’d think an R7ii might drive more sales of those lenses and those lenses might drive more sales of an R7ii, no?
 
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Jul 21, 2010
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I agree with what you’ve written, but I’m not sure I follow the last part. Those three lenses are for (more) affordable ‘reach’. I’d think an R7ii might drive more sales of those lenses and those lenses might drive more sales of an R7ii, no?
Possibly. My point was that the reluctance of some APS-C users to switch to FF could be ‘losing reach’ and affordable long lenses mitigate that. The R8 is cheaper than the R7.

Practically, combining the 600/11 or 800/11 with the R7 doesn’t add nearly as much ‘reach’ as people might think, because of diffraction. Not every buyer will be aware of that, though.
 
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