New Autofocus RF mount tilt-shift lenses expected after next round of camera announcements

There are some posts here about choosing 3 points to define the tilt plane. Imagine, if you will, going into live mode on a R5m2 with a new TS lens and starting a tilt mode shot. You go through using the touch screen to select 3 points on the back for the camera to autofocus on individually and it then works out the correct tilt and sets the lens for you when you push the shutter button.
Whatever the UI is going to be, if it's remotely useable I'll probably find use cases when I'm shooting handheld. That said, I doubt such features would have me replace my existing 17mm with a newer model. One of the rumors over the past 2'ish years was about wider TS lens with about 14mm. If that one gets released and crosses my bang/buck ratio I'll buy it.
 
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I’ve a number of TS-E lens. 17mm, 24mm, 50mm and 90mm. What I like about them is manual focus. With live screen I have exactly what I want in focus. Autofocus isn’t a great advantage. The slowing down and precision just makes for better images especially in architecture. If I am handholding I use a 24-70 far more practical. I mainly use 24mm TS-E. It’s great . 17mm is great for tall buildings but not as sharp. A sharp 17mm or 14mm would be tempting but autofocus will add to the price. I mainly shift only. Slight tilt can increase depth of field but it’s hard to be precise. I’ve done the toytown look but it’s practically better in software. Let’s see how they go. For sharpness a 17mm might be worth a look. I think the 24mm will be hard to improve on. For me autofocus won’t be an improvement.
 
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London just last week I heard of a gang swipe some “big camera & white lens” on a motor bike with its tripod along the A13. Mobile phones are no less a target too, ridiculous crime rates around Oxford Circus
I lived in London 3 years or so and while I'd love to visit the city like a week a year for restaurants and a bit of sight-seeing, otherwise I don't really like it: the pollution, the crime. I had two bikes stolen from my parking area, which was nearly impossible to get to. (You needed a pass card to get into the B1 parking, then take a car elevator down to B2.) So either it was a tradesman working on-site (and the trades are mostly native Brits) or someone who could afford USD3000-4000/month for rent. In Tokyo, a coworker who had spent a few school years in the UK walked past a restaurant's unmonitored table of maybe 300 bento lunch boxes they'd sell in the lunch rush. "In the UK, you'd steal one of those even if you weren't hungry," he remarked. I had another London parking space I was renting from one posh owner (address was in Knightsbridge!) who sold it and lied to the new person about the rental agreement we had. It wasn't formal: I think I just sent them a check for USD300/month every month or something like that, but after 18 months they sold it and told the new guy they had absolutely no idea who I was and I certainly didn't have permission to use their parking. There's something just morally corrupt in Britain from the posh down to the tradespeople. Frankly I trust the foreigners in London but not the natives. (Luckily it's more than half foreign.)
 
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I lived in London 3 years or so and while I'd love to visit the city like a week a year for restaurants and a bit of sight-seeing, otherwise I don't really like it: the pollution, the crime. I had two bikes stolen from my parking area, which was nearly impossible to get to. (You needed a pass card to get into the B1 parking, then take a car elevator down to B2.) So either it was a tradesman working on-site (and the trades are mostly native Brits) or someone who could afford USD3000-4000/month for rent. In Tokyo, a coworker who had spent a few school years in the UK walked past a restaurant's unmonitored table of maybe 300 bento lunch boxes they'd sell in the lunch rush. "In the UK, you'd steal one of those even if you weren't hungry," he remarked. I had another London parking space I was renting from one posh owner (address was in Knightsbridge!) who sold it and lied to the new person about the rental agreement we had. It wasn't formal: I think I just sent them a check for USD300/month every month or something like that, but after 18 months they sold it and told the new guy they had absolutely no idea who I was and I certainly didn't have permission to use their parking. There's something just morally corrupt in Britain from the posh down to the tradespeople. Frankly I trust the foreigners in London but not the natives. (Luckily it's more than half foreign.)
You condemn nearly 9 million people, based on a few anecdotes.
 
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You condemn nearly 9 million people, based on a few anecdotes.
I've been many times in England, Wales and Scotland. Also using Leicas and big whites, even in cities. Never one single bad or criminal experience. And I met a lot of friendly people.
In fact, I once forgot my filled camera bag in Luton on a parking lot. Guess what happened? A young Englishman brought it to the local police. Apart from the Leicas and the Nikon, there were about 600 GBP in my wallet, also in the bag. Not one penny was missing.
Of course, crime exists in Britain and elsewhere, certainly more than 20-30 years ago...
But I always felt safe, more than in some areas of my hometown in France, where I'd never venture with a camera, not even in daylight. Not even with an Instamatic...
 
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1: There exists or existed a reflex housing which was mounted on the bayonet of bthe Leica M, turning it into a DSLR.
2: This so-called Visoflex was a prosthesis, slow to use and not very practical.
3: I used my 800mm (560 + 1,4X Ext.) exclusively on my Leicaflexes, Leica Rs and even on the EOS 5 DIII, so only on real DSLRs.
Focusing an 800mm on a rangefinder camera? Not a single chance to get one picture in focus!
That's what I didn't understand! Bhphoto seems to still have a model two for M11. It would be interesting to try, but I think for manual focusing on birds in flight natural talent is required. I don't personally think I want 800mm for anything else, but maybe you have something like distant mountains?
Ahh managed to get this quote working on my mobile.

This is so funny, last year (2023) during a sunny day we compared a family shot, one on some mobile and another my R7 with 0.71x (I was playing around with it) and the EF70-300L. The phone only had a benefit on the fact it was shared instantly via WhatsApp (which reduced its quality even more). Then my image followed an hr later and was like comparing 8k to 300px thumbnail.

Went A bit off topic sorry, but I have the TS24 finally, not put it through its paces yet. Just be careful people when using your equipment especially on tripods or solo, in London just last week I heard of a gang swipe some “big camera & white lens” on a motor bike with its tripod along the A13. Mobile phones are no less a target too, ridiculous crime rates around Oxford Circus.
Depressing that could happen on such a large city with cameras everywhere, I would think someone could identify that motorcycle rider theif, but I guess it won't happen.
 
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I've been many times in England, Wales and Scotland. Also using Leicas and big whites, even in cities. Never one single bad or criminal experience. And I met a lot of friendly people.
In fact, I once forgot my filled camera bag in Luton on a parking lot. Guess what happened? A young Englishman brought it to the local police. Apart from the Leicas and the Nikon, there were about 600 GBP in my wallet, also in the bag. Not one penny was missing.
Of course, crime exists in Britain and elsewhere, certainly more than 20-30 years ago...
But I always felt safe, more than in some areas of my hometown in France, where I'd never venture with a camera, not even in daylight. Not even with an Instamatic...
There is a certain advantage in this respect being in our home countries. I do think you wete lucky although I am quite cynical about human nature, there are both virtuous people and other types everywhere. The ratio varies but there must be some luck involved (unless you believe in predestination)
 
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That's what I didn't understand! Bhphoto seems to still have a model two for M11. It would be interesting to try, but I think for manual focusing on birds in flight natural talent is required. I don't personally think I want 800mm for anything else, but maybe you have something like distant mountains?

Depressing that could happen on such a large city with cameras everywhere, I would think someone could identify that motorcycle rider theif, but I guess it won't happen.
The Visoflex B&H or other retailers sell for the M11 is the electronic one, nothing to do with the original purely mechanical Visoflex. They kept the name, but nothing else. In both cases, yet, the use of long teles is possible.
 
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I lived in London 3 years or so and while I'd love to visit the city like a week a year for restaurants and a bit of sight-seeing, otherwise I don't really like it: the pollution, the crime. I had two bikes stolen from my parking area, which was nearly impossible to get to. (You needed a pass card to get into the B1 parking, then take a car elevator down to B2.) So either it was a tradesman working on-site (and the trades are mostly native Brits) or someone who could afford USD3000-4000/month for rent. In Tokyo, a coworker who had spent a few school years in the UK walked past a restaurant's unmonitored table of maybe 300 bento lunch boxes they'd sell in the lunch rush. "In the UK, you'd steal one of those even if you weren't hungry," he remarked. I had another London parking space I was renting from one posh owner (address was in Knightsbridge!) who sold it and lied to the new person about the rental agreement we had. It wasn't formal: I think I just sent them a check for USD300/month every month or something like that, but after 18 months they sold it and told the new guy they had absolutely no idea who I was and I certainly didn't have permission to use their parking. There's something just morally corrupt in Britain from the posh down to the tradespeople. Frankly I trust the foreigners in London but not the natives. (Luckily it's more than half foreign.)
*Shrug* I've visited London eight times in the last twelve months and have had no bad experiences. I'm not sure it's wise to extrapolate a couple of bad anecdotes to an entire population. (I've no doubt Japan and Switzerland have lower crime rates, but they are global outliers). London has all the problems of any big city. But most places, most of the time, are fine.
 
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I lived in London 3 years or so and while I'd love to visit the city like a week a year for restaurants and a bit of sight-seeing, otherwise I don't really like it: the pollution, the crime. I had two bikes stolen from my parking area, which was nearly impossible to get to. (You needed a pass card to get into the B1 parking, then take a car elevator down to B2.) So either it was a tradesman working on-site (and the trades are mostly native Brits) or someone who could afford USD3000-4000/month for rent. In Tokyo, a coworker who had spent a few school years in the UK walked past a restaurant's unmonitored table of maybe 300 bento lunch boxes they'd sell in the lunch rush. "In the UK, you'd steal one of those even if you weren't hungry," he remarked. I had another London parking space I was renting from one posh owner (address was in Knightsbridge!) who sold it and lied to the new person about the rental agreement we had. It wasn't formal: I think I just sent them a check for USD300/month every month or something like that, but after 18 months they sold it and told the new guy they had absolutely no idea who I was and I certainly didn't have permission to use their parking. There's something just morally corrupt in Britain from the posh down to the tradespeople. Frankly I trust the foreigners in London but not the natives. (Luckily it's more than half foreign.)
I believe Japan is the most trustworthy country. I know people who forgot their laptop somewhere - even on a train and when they came back it was either still there or in the possession of someone with authority at the train station, café or where it was forgotten.
 
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I believe Japan is the most trustworthy country. I know people who forgot their laptop somewhere - even on a train and when they came back it was either still there or in the possession of someone with authority at the train station, café or where it was forgotten.
Japanese regular employees typically get a bonus twice a year of about 1-2 months pay each. (maybe 1 month summer, 1.5 month winter). Until the mid-80s, it'd often be cash in an envelope. Bonus day would be a good day to go out drinking, and every year there'd be stories of people who dropped their bonus cash envelope and get it a couple days later at the police koban (tiny neighborhood police station, sometimes as small as about 4 phone booths).
 
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Japanese regular employees typically get a bonus twice a year of about 1-2 months pay each. (maybe 1 month summer, 1.5 month winter). Until the mid-80s, it'd often be cash in an envelope. Bonus day would be a good day to go out drinking, and every year there'd be stories of people who dropped their bonus cash envelope and get it a couple days later at the police koban (tiny neighborhood police station, sometimes as small as about 4 phone booths).
I've seen the police koban and think it's a great idea. Probably if this strategy was used in every country, it would lower crime worldwide. Unfortunately, there will still be crime by groups.
 
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The prospect of the new T/S lenses on an R5 Mark II really gets the GAS building up. But for me this is one of those occasions where what I'm really hoping is that there will be a glut of very lightly used 24 mm Mark IIs and 50 mm Macros going for a song.
 
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The prospect of the new T/S lenses on an R5 Mark II really gets the GAS building up. But for me this is one of those occasions where what I'm really hoping is that there will be a glut of very lightly used 24 mm Mark IIs and 50 mm Macros going for a song.

Oh, I doubt it. Unless these new lenses are exact match in terms of FOV, I'm pretty sure most will look just to add them to their lens roster, rather than sell off the previous models. I honestly can't remember the last time I sold a lens. Probably 20 years ago.
 
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Oh, I doubt it. Unless these new lenses are exact match in terms of FOV, I'm pretty sure most will look just to add them to their lens roster, rather than sell off the previous models. I honestly can't remember the last time I sold a lens. Probably 20 years ago.
I have a different mindset. If I don't use a lens with at least some regularity, I sell it. IMO, no point in hanging onto something I don't use, even if it's a Roki 14/2.8 that's only worth $100. But I currently have 27 lenses, so I'd say I have a big enough roster to choose from.
 
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It is useful when training in karate but not really conversational :)
It becomes the common language amongst all Japanese martial arts globally.
Hey, about your Flickr images, which blow me away. I loved your starscapes but noted a couple galaxies I didn't think I usually saw in such shots. It came to me in a dream last night that maybe you were in the southern hemisphere and they were the Magellanic Clouds. Is that the case? (Over on the left in this shot.)
 
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