Packing list for trip of a lifetime

Caps18

EOS RP
Feb 24, 2011
286
0
I have a 1514 Rolling Pelican Case. ::) And you can call me what you want, but my $10k of camera gear gets around the world safely. I wouldn't worry about water with a Pelican case. You do have to worry about size and weight restrictions.

I saw this in a magazine the other day. Look at the Chattooga duffel bag, but I'm not sure how much impact protection it will have. And you couldn't sit on it, or carry multiple lenses most likely.
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=chattooga+duffel

Have you thought at all about macro shots? Study up and practice a few to see how you do with them. I would guess that there are insects and flowers and the like that would be interesting.
 
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leftcoastman

Guest
Rocky said:
Galagapos is all about wild life and birds. So a long lens is a must. There are FOUR shooter in the family. All his gears distributed between four of them will be very light. Honestly, I am not a fan of long lenses. The longest lens that I own is 135mm. The 17-40 and 28-135 has travelled with me to all continent and I have never feel that I have the need of anything longer than 135. Galapagos is a totally different situation. That is why I borrow a 70-300 DO IS. I am so glad that I have the lens in Galagapos. I am speaking from experience. I was there last year.

I won't argue over lens choice, because everyone is different. My photos from Antarctica, which got unsolicited purchase offers, were mostly taken with a 17-55mm. But that's just my particular style. And realistically, it's an argument with no right answer precisely because everyone is different.

My opinion still holds that you want to minimize vs. do the American thing and bring everything and the kitchen sink (I am American, btw). Pelican is waaaaaaay overkill. I SWAM to shore simply using a drybag over my backpack. And I can assure you, if you're on a hike, a small backpack will be infinitely more pleasant to carry around than a Pelican case.

And of course, your weight limitations will become a serious factor if you bring a heavy Pelican case. If you're intent on gearing up big-time, then I still would rather use my weight allocation on actual camera gear vs. overkill to carry your stuff.

I also suggest insuring your stuff. That way, you won't be freaking out constantly about damage and will be able to enjoy your trip far more.
 

1255

EOS M6 Mark II
May 10, 2012
53
0
just gonna throw in a +1 for the gopro2 suggestion, tiny, waterproof, decent stills, great video, outstanding possibilities for time lapse. it's a really fun little toy.
 

Joes Dad

EOS M50
Feb 14, 2011
26
0
Los Angeles
www.davidmhuff.com
Congrats on the trip. Seems like everyone is generally on the right track in my view. I am about to do you a huge favor though. FORGET ANY AND ALL IDEAS ABOUT THE 28-300. It is a tank and it shoots soft. I tried and tried again to make it work because I wanted it to so badly, but the weight factor becomes stupid after a while and images at the long end I found disappointing. (When I say weight, understand I am 6'1" 250 - and I still found it too heavy for comfortable use.). As a single shooter, I would carry the 16-35, 24-105 and 70-200 with 1.4x. To give you perspective on my true feelings on the 28-300 weight v. value ratio, I would likely also carry my 300 f/2.8L with 1.4x instead of the 100-400, but I understand why you might take the 100-400 instead. I think dry bags in lightweight non-waterproof backpacks work great for these kinds of conditions. Given there is four of you, I would bring the tripod. Gotta be a shot there. Also, I have become a huge fan of the RRS little $99 pocket-pod. Check it out. Good luck.
 

Rocky

EOS R
Jul 30, 2010
1,006
87
leftcoastman said:
Rocky said:
Galagapos is all about wild life and birds. So a long lens is a must. There are FOUR shooter in the family. All his gears distributed between four of them will be very light. Honestly, I am not a fan of long lenses. The longest lens that I own is 135mm. The 17-40 and 28-135 has travelled with me to all continent and I have never feel that I have the need of anything longer than 135. Galapagos is a totally different situation. That is why I borrow a 70-300 DO IS. I am so glad that I have the lens in Galagapos. I am speaking from experience. I was there last year.

I won't argue over lens choice, because everyone is different. My photos from Antarctica, which got unsolicited purchase offers, were mostly taken with a 17-55mm. But that's just my particular style. And realistically, it's an argument with no right answer precisely because everyone is different.

My opinion still holds that you want to minimize vs. do the American thing and bring everything and the kitchen sink (I am American, btw). Pelican is waaaaaaay overkill. I SWAM to shore simply using a drybag over my backpack. And I can assure you, if you're on a hike, a small backpack will be infinitely more pleasant to carry around than a Pelican case.

And of course, your weight limitations will become a serious factor if you bring a heavy Pelican case. If you're intent on gearing up big-time, then I still would rather use my weight allocation on actual camera gear vs. overkill to carry your stuff.

I also suggest insuring your stuff. That way, you won't be freaking out constantly about damage and will be able to enjoy your trip far more.
Looks like you have quoted the wrong person. I have never suggested a pelican case. I stress being mobile and I told them I have used the Nova AW shoulder bag (from my previous post).The only reason why I suggested them to bring all their lenses is because ALL four people in the family are shooters. They already have 4 camera bodies. So 6 lenses total is reasonable. It is less than 2 lenses per person. Just try to keep peace in the family. Plus when everybody carries their own camera. It is be very mobile.
Contrary to common believe, wild life in Galapago are semi afraid of people. Therefore you cannot get too close.
Therefore a long lens is required unless you want the sea iguana to fill 1/4 the width of you picture only and you can forget the fire crab also.
 
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leftcoastman

Guest
Yeah, started to quote/respond to your post, got distracted and then thought about the Pelican suggestion. :)

As I was travelling alone primarily, keeping the family happy wasn't a consideration. Having seen a few families spend a whole trip yelling at each other and feeling sorry for them, maybe I should do an about face and suggest that you bring anything and everything necessary to prevent that situation!
 

Leejo

Still relearning the same things...
Jul 20, 2012
46
0
I've not done this type of trip - though I envy you for being able to.
Two tips from Podcasts I have heard.

1. The Nikonians Podcast (Nikonian Doctors or similar) had an episode in which one recalled his journey to the Galapogas -
OK it's a couple of years old and you will have to translate from N to Canon gear.
They are primarily landscape photographers but non-bird wildlife is also mentioned.

2. As far as the extreme conditions associated with boating is concerned you might want to listen to Martin Bailey's podcast on his trip to Antartica. He recommended a waterproof bag - pricey but if you are shooting with Canon pro gear...


I would go for a 7D with 70-300L, and a 5D with 16-35L at least. Plus a standard such as the 24-105L, and a maybe second lens for the 7D - but there are few that are weather sealed.
If you want BiF then I'd go for either third party TC's (the 70-300 doesn't work with Canon's) or the 100-400 with a Canon 1.4x TC
(not good with a 2x TC in my opinion).

Not sure myself if a fast fifty is required - but it's small enough to hardly notice. A good flash and the best gorilla pod would round up the minimum.
Unless you are really going to concentrate on underwater photography I would take a few rugged waterproof P&S cameras instead - it would give something for the other two people to shoot with if you are only taking two bodies.
 

tapanit

.
CR Pro
Jul 17, 2012
105
33
Leejo said:
2. As far as the extreme conditions associated with boating is concerned you might want to listen to Martin Bailey's podcast on his trip to Antartica. He recommended a waterproof bag - pricey but if you are shooting with Canon pro gear...
I don't recall any problems carrying cameras in regular Lowepro bags. Waterproof bags are clumsy to open and close, not worth it in Galapagos.
I would go for a 7D with 70-300L, and a 5D with 16-35L at least. Plus a standard such as the 24-105L, and a maybe second lens for the 7D - but there are few that are weather sealed.

If you want BiF then I'd go for either third party TC's (the 70-300 doesn't work with Canon's) or the 100-400 with a Canon 1.4x TC
(not good with a 2x TC in my opinion).
Agreed on the 70-300L. You might make do with one wide-angle, depending on your shooting style.

The 100-400L is not very good even with the 1.4x, and with 7D it won't autofocus with it either. But by itself it works very well with 7D. As for water-sealing, I wouldn't worry about it. It's not that wet there.
Not sure myself if a fast fifty is required - but it's small enough to hardly notice.
I carried one and hardly used it at all. (It was very useful later on the same trip on Equador mainland, though.)
Unless you are really going to concentrate on underwater photography I would take a few rugged waterproof P&S cameras instead - it would give something for the other two people to shoot with if you are only taking two bodies.
I actually missed the "two bodies" part in the original message - probably subconsciously filtered it as impossible. I'd never think of going to Galapagos without at least one body PER PERSON and one spare in case one breaks. If I go there again I'll take two bodies and a waterproof P&S just for myself, and my wife wouldn't be caught dead without at least one DSLR and a P&S of her own.

Seriously: If the kids are even remotely interested in nature photography, buy, borrow or steal at least one more body (even a lowly Rebel). When walking on the islands you really need a camera and a long(ish) lens for every person (200mm is enough for most purposes, BIF excluded). Wide-angle lenses can be shared easier, sceneries wait for you to swap lenses.

And get one bag per SLR, capable of holding it with one long lens, so that everyone (every photographer) carries one. For yourself a little bigger bag with room for the wide-angle lenses &c. Backbacks or good shoulder/sling bags that stay put when jumping off a boat. Forget Pelicans and the like.
 

Videoshooter

EOS M6 Mark II
Jul 13, 2012
80
0
leftcoastman said:
Being that you are going to be flying on small planes, riding on zodiacs and generally around a bunch of other tourists, you don't want to be the prick with the massive rolling Pelican case.

In my experience, fellow travellers have loved the fact that I always carry the portable chair/workbench/cricket-stumps/cubby house/dining table/go cart/toboggan/bomb shelter/life raft/ladder/shield/security locker/wheelbarrow/hospital bed that is my Pelican 1650 Case.

Of course, if you don't need the bomb shelter or cubby house options, they do make a range of briefcase-sized cases that are perfect for a camera body and a few lenses. :)
 
S

smr

Guest
I am lucky enough to have been to the Galapagos twice - both trips were one week cruises on board a 16 berth motor yacht.

The gear you take depends on the type of cruise you are booked on. Specialist photography cruises assume you will carry all the gear (inc tripod), tend to be slower moving when on land to give time to frame that perfect shot, and the other tourists are also all keen photographers. General cruises tend to be faster moving on land and most of the other passengers will just have a point-and-shoot. If you take a tripod and keep stopping to swap lenses on a general cruise you will almost certainly start to test the patience of your fellow passengers and the guide.

So unless you are booked on a specialist photography cruise, I would leave the tripod at home and try to travel light. Both my trips were general cruises, and I found that a LowePro DryZone Rover was ideal for safely carrying my kit. It comfortably carried my 7D with 70-200 f4 IS L (sometimes with a with 1.4 extender) and a 600D with 10-22 (mainly to give me a back-up body but also to allow wide landscape shots without the need to change lens). The waterproof rucksack allowed me to be in and out of the pangas (the small boats that ferry you ashore) as quick as the other passengers and the second body meant I didn't hold up the group changing lenses. Whilst you would probably be OK without a fully waterproof rucksack, it does give peace of mind.

I found the 70-200 f4 IS on the crop sensor 7D to be ideal for most of the Galapagos wildlife, although the 1.4 extender was useful when targeting the smaller birds (e.g. the various species of Darwin's Finches).
 
S

smr

Guest
The waterproof zip on the DryZone Rover can be a bit tricky until you get the hang of it, but I have not had any problems with it.
 

Rocky

EOS R
Jul 30, 2010
1,006
87
smr said:
The waterproof zip on the DryZone Rover can be a bit tricky until you get the hang of it, but I have not had any problems with it.
I like the Lowepro Nova AW bags. The water proof cover will cover all zipper for the compartments. If you do not need it, the cover will be tucked back inside its own compartment. Then It will be used just like an ordinary bag. So you do not need one bag for dry condition and another bag for wet condition. I have used it in the heavy rain many times and jumped off the Zodiac many times also.
 

Crapking

"Whatever you are....be a good one." AL
Nov 9, 2011
445
0
jjlabella.photoshelter.com
With less than a week till departure, I had to pull the trigger and got the DryZone 200.
Travelled domestically this weekend and brought it just to test it out. Fit in regional jet overhead and carried my 1D-X, 70-100, 24-70 and 16-35 and my new shorty forty mounted, plus plenty of cable/caps/filters room, and flash, gorilla pod. Rides higher on back and has large profile but glad to have it.
Still debating on underwater option.
Can't decide between GoPro or an underwater P/S (D20)?
Help :)
 
S

smr

Guest
I took a PowerShot D10 on my Galapagos trips for use underwater. It did leak once (possibly when I knocked it climbing into the panga) and the screen packed up. But it soon dried out and the screen came back to life. The underwater mode on the D10 (I assume the D20 has a similar mode) cuts through the murk giving good underwater photos.
 

CharlieB

EOS RP
Jul 29, 2012
303
0
If I were going - I'd bring the longest glass I owned, for the birds and wildlife. I'd bring a 24-105 or similar, and I'd bring my 28/1.8 for whatever night time fast lens and/or wide use. And I'd bring one of my M4Ps, with a 35/2.0 and some film, as backup.

I travel much, hate to be burdened with gear.

Instead of trying to immerse my technology into my environment, with me behind it, I'd rather immerse myself into my environment, and use whatever I've got. Based on images I've got from the early 70's, when all I had was a match needle Nikkormat and a 50/2.0 lens... I can say - less is more, for me.