Potential privacy issue with Canon cameras and copyright info setting

peters

EOS RP
Dec 25, 2017
353
323
I would see this as a feature. In case the camera gets stole this MAY improve your chances to prove ownership, if you are lucky.
 
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zim

EOS 5D Mark IV
CR Pro
Oct 18, 2011
2,023
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Gen X thank you very much. And I learned Pascal in college on an original 128K Apple Macintosh! :)
To kind, to kind :giggle:, I use to teach Cobal, in fairness I was the same age as some of the students :eek:
 

privatebydesign

Garfield is back...
CR Pro
Jan 29, 2011
9,188
3,410
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I sold a 1DX II that had all my copyright and contact info in it to another pro photographer. He didn’t normally enter his info in the camera just in post. One of his clients is a University sports team and in their contract they have to deliver the RAW files and the University has copyright of any images shot of their team members or on their property. He got in a ton of shit because he delivered RAW files with copyright info that was incorrect.

I know it isn’t directly related to the thread but close enough to mention it.
 
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SteveC

R5
CR Pro
Sep 3, 2019
1,855
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Gen X thank you very much. And I learned Pascal in college on an original 128K Apple Macintosh! :)
OK, but pascal doesn't null terminate its strings...at least not the original pascal. the strings are indexed [1] to [255] and location [0] is actually the length of the string, so no termination needed. Maybe later versions of Pascal do something different, but this was Pascal as of 1983.

C and C++ do null terminate their strings, writing an ascii zero in the first position would give you an empty string.
 

mdcmdcmdc

CR Pro
Sep 4, 2020
6
1
OK, but pascal doesn't null terminate its strings...at least not the original pascal. the strings are indexed [1] to [255] and location [0] is actually the length of the string, so no termination needed. Maybe later versions of Pascal do something different, but this was Pascal as of 1983.

C and C++ do null terminate their strings, writing an ascii zero in the first position would give you an empty string.
Yes that was the joke. When they set the first byte, the length byte, to zero, the string has zero length so it is ignored.
 
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Antono Refa

EOS R
Mar 26, 2014
1,131
313
I don't see the privacy issue here. If the camera is sold 2nd hand or stolen, and someone finds out the [previous] owner's name. So? People aren't secretive about their camera model.
 

SteveC

R5
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Sep 3, 2019
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Yes that was the joke. When they set the first byte, the length byte, to zero, the string has zero length so it is ignored.
Oh THAT first byte. OK, gotcha!!! :ROFLMAO: (I was thinking of the first byte of the string proper, i.e., string[1].)

(Amusing, though how it ends up working the same way for Pascal and C for two totally different reasons!)
 
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mdcmdcmdc

CR Pro
Sep 4, 2020
6
1
Oh THAT first byte. OK, gotcha!!! :ROFLMAO: (I was thinking of the first byte of the string proper, i.e., string[1].)

(Amusing, though how it ends up working the same way for Pascal and C for two totally different reasons!)
That is pretty funny. My mind immediately went to the Pascal length byte, but you’re right, putting the C null terminator there would have the same effect.

They probably actually wrote it in C++. To delete the strings, they called std::string::clear(), and their compiler implemented it that way.

Cheers!
 

SteveC

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Sep 3, 2019
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That is pretty funny. My mind immediately went to the Pascal length byte, but you’re right, putting the C null terminator there would have the same effect.

They probably actually wrote it in C++. To delete the strings, they called std::string::clear(), and their compiler implemented it that way.

Cheers!
Hmm...std::string supposedly works differently from the old school char * string, and as far as I know isn't null terminated. But on second thought, I should try some experiments, because I know that std::string's .c_str( ) function call does return a null-terminated string, so maybe, in fact, it does use a null terminator and all the class buys you is automagic resizing and concatenation operators. (If I can set some std::string's first character to zero and still have it return a length greater than zero when I call length( ), it's doing something different, regardless of whether c_str() returns an "empty" char * string [which I would expect it to do].) Such experiments should look at the actual address returned by c_str( ) as well as its referent....
 
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Oct 13, 2015
21
14
Germany
I don't see the privacy issue here. If the camera is sold 2nd hand or stolen, and someone finds out the [previous] owner's name. So? People aren't secretive about their camera model.
Well that might be true for Canon cameras, but imagine someone found out you once had an affair with a Nikon camera, that could thoroughly taint your reputation. :LOL:
 

mdcmdcmdc

CR Pro
Sep 4, 2020
6
1
Well that might be true for Canon cameras, but imagine someone found out you once had an affair with a Nikon camera, that could thoroughly taint your reputation. :LOL:
When I was in between my last film SLR (EOS 100) and my first DSLR (EOS 20D), I had a brief fling with an Olympus C-5050. She was a hot little number with some great specs in those days (wink, wink)! And hoo-wee what a lens! But it didn't last long. She didn't have the fastest autofocus in the camera bag, if you know what I mean.