The Canon EOS “R7” has been pushed to Q4 of 2022

I haven't seen anyone mention inflation and pricing (not that I've mined the comments exhaustively). The $1800 a 7dii cost in 2014 would run about $2200 in today's dollars. Yes you get more bang for your buck from new tech as the years go by, but I think $1800 for a crop-sensor RF camera with comparatively similar features (pro build quality, high frame rate, top end AF etc) to the 7dii is wishful thinking.
 
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Chig

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I haven't seen anyone mention inflation and pricing (not that I've mined the comments exhaustively). The $1800 a 7dii cost in 2014 would run about $2200 in today's dollars. Yes you get more bang for your buck from new tech as the years go by, but I think $1800 for a crop-sensor RF camera with comparatively similar features (pro build quality, high frame rate, top end AF etc) to the 7dii is wishful thinking.
Similar pricing to the R6 makes sense which is about USD2,500.
An R7 based on the R6 but with a new BSI stacked crop sensor and no IBIS (to save costs ) should be a strong seller if it's priced at $2,500 or even a bit higher.
An R7 based on the R3 with the same new BSI stacked crop sensor and priced about the same as an R5 could be popular too
An R7 reusing the old M6ii/90D sensor would be a bit too far behind the current technology to be competitive especially as Nikon and Sony may bring out something superior.
 
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LogicExtremist

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Just by the weight of sheer probability, it's most likely that Canon will just reuse an older sensor such as the one from the 90D on an R7 if it's ever released.
Looking at all the RF camera bodies released, other than the two most expensive bodies, they all use repurpoed sensors from previous DSLR camera bodies.

2022 Canon EOS R3 - new 24.1 MP stacked BSI CMOS sensor
2020 Canon EOS R5 - new 45MP CMOS sensor
2020 Canon EOS R6 - reused EOS 1D X Mark III 20MP CMOS sensor
2019 Canon EOS RP - reused EOS 6D Mark II DSLR 26MP CMOS sensor
2018 Canon EOS R - reused EOS 5D Mark IV DSLR 30MP CMOS sensor

If there are possible cost cutting measures, they will likely be taken by Canon. See the post below:

Canon’s Imaging Unit Grew, Profits Shrunk on Costs, ‘Various Measures’ Coming
The company said it expected double-digit profit growth in future quarters “as negative impact of cost increase is absorbed through various measures.”
 
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tapanit

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An R7 reusing the old M6ii/90D sensor would be a bit too far behind the current technology to be competitive especially as Nikon and Sony may bring out something superior.
Agreed. A crop R makes sense to Canon only if it brings money in - if it increases their net profits, counting everything including its development and manufacturing costs and its impact on their other models' sales.

A really cheap "Rebel R" might do that, but it would not be called R7.

The only kind of R7 that I can see making sense would be a "crop R5". Everything R5 does except some video features (no 8k), a sensor that's better than R5 in crop mode (at least somewhat higher pixel density). Maybe with R6 body style and dual SD card slots, but perhaps R5 style is more likely simply as a means to lure people upgrading to an R5. I can't see them omitting IBIS. Price would be somewhere around what R6 costs.

That said, I'm still very doubtful whether it will materialize at all. But we'll see.
 
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Bob Howland

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I haven't seen anyone mention inflation and pricing (not that I've mined the comments exhaustively). The $1800 a 7dii cost in 2014 would run about $2200 in today's dollars. Yes you get more bang for your buck from new tech as the years go by, but I think $1800 for a crop-sensor RF camera with comparatively similar features (pro build quality, high frame rate, top end AF etc) to the 7dii is wishful thinking.
I stated $1800 in a previous post. It's possible that that is not my final offer. It's also possible that I'm not about to admit that in an open forum, especially one that Canon might just possibly read.
 
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Those of you hoping that this camera is going to be spec'd near the R3 are just setting yourselves up for disappointment. There is no way Canon is going to release a $2000 body (or even can for that matter) that can compete with it's $6000 R3 with the only difference being an APS-C sensor and a smaller body. The R3 is is 6K for a reason. I would expect an APS-C version of the R5 (maybe 24mp, non-stacked), 12fps Mech/20mp Electronic) with the same AF as the R5/R6. With that, I think you're looking at at least $2500 if not $3000. At $2000 you're looking more at an APS-C R6.
 
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tron

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Reusing 90D's sensor wouldn't be disappointing provided they did one minor change: Making a real 7DIII = a DSLR even as a last one.

Of course this is pure fantasy. It is of course technically feasible but somehow we all know it is not going to happen.

If they make R7 much faster in reaction (than R5) and improve focusing (with something like Quad pixel?) it would make a DSLR 7DIII unnecessary though.

Otherwise no problem for me: My D500 is the 7DIII I always wanted. Fast, with very good focusing, 200 raw photos buffer (with fast XQD) and a battery that lasts for thousands of photos.
 
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I remain unconvinced we'll see an APS-C EOS R model at all. But if we do, in the current market I doubt Canon will try to replicate the broad lineup of APS-C DSLRs. Thinking of the RF 18-45/4-5.6 on the roadmap, I can see Canon coming out with a single APC-S R model, an R7 that is the entry-level APS-C gateway to the RF system.

Either way (no APS-C R or an entry-level one), most of those on this forum hoping for an APS-C EOS R are not going to get the camera they want. The reality is that people know what they want, while Canon knows what the market wants.

VoD.gif
 
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Reusing 90D's sensor wouldn't be disappointing provided they did one minor change: Making a real 7DIII = a DSLR even as a last one.

Of course this is pure fantasy. It is of course technically feasible but somehow we all know it is not going to happen.

If they make R7 much faster in reaction (than R5) and improve focusing (with something like Quad pixel?) it would make a DSLR 7DIII unnecessary though.

Otherwise no problem for me: My D500 is the 7DIII I always wanted. Fast, with very good focusing, 200 raw photos buffer (with fast XQD) and a battery that lasts for thousands of photos.
If we see Quad Pixel (or any other new AF tech) it will come in the R1 long before it shows up in a prosumer body. If there is an R7, it will likely be the same as in the R5/R6, which really isn't a bad thing. I'd rather have that than what any DSLR could offer as it outperforms any DSLR I've ever used (including 1DX II). My friend went from a D500 to a Z6 II and as bad as the AF is in the Z6 II, he still says it outperforms his D500. I know he gets better results.
 
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