There are still surprises in store for the Canon EOS R5 announcement [CR2]

Sporgon

5% of gear used 95% of the time
CR Pro
Not saying it doesn't do anything. Just saying that for my photography it does not work. It may prioritize the focus point but it does not prioritize it enough to make a meaningful difference for me. Which is why i have tobuse either spot metering linked to center focus point or most of the time use centre weighted average. Evaluative rarely ever cuts it with birds against a bright sky
Sometimes it is enough to get optimum exposure and sometimes, just like any reflective metering, it doesn't produce the exposure that you want, but the evaluation is linked to AF point, and as Sharlin says, it's easy enough to watch it happening. You're not on your own though in not realising that's it's been happening. I recon the majority of users don't realise !!

The metering and it's 'intelligence' is always getting better from generation to generation, and so I would expect the R5 to be better just as the future 5DV will be. It's interesting that Canon have chosen to highlight this in the R5 specs, maybe they too have realised no one knows about the feature. Certainly now, with my 5DS I really don't have to worry about getting a useable exposure, although I'm still one of those people that like to take an incident meter reading if feasible.

As I'm sure you are aware, Spot metering linked to a single AF point is a really dangerous way of metering and you have to be aware of its limitations, which is probably why Canon only offer it in the 1 series. Spot metering, by its very nature, is intended to be used over multiple areas of the scene to assess an exposure, not as a single spot reading, yet this is exactly what linking it to a single AF point is likely to do, and so a degree of EC is likely to be required anyway, otherwise you could end up with a right royal hash in overall exposure of the image.
 

Aussie shooter

https://brettguyphotography.picfair.com/
Dec 6, 2016
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brettguyphotography.picfair.com
Sometimes it is enough to get optimum exposure and sometimes, just like any reflective metering, it doesn't produce the exposure that you want, but the evaluation is linked to AF point, and as Sharlin says, it's easy enough to watch it happening. You're not on your own though in not realising that's it's been happening. I recon the majority of users don't realise !!

The metering and it's 'intelligence' is always getting better from generation to generation, and so I would expect the R5 to be better just as the future 5DV will be. It's interesting that Canon have chosen to highlight this in the R5 specs, maybe they too have realised no one knows about the feature. Certainly now, with my 5DS I really don't have to worry about getting a useable exposure, although I'm still one of those people that like to take an incident meter reading if feasible.

As I'm sure you are aware, Spot metering linked to a single AF point is a really dangerous way of metering and you have to be aware of its limitations, which is probably why Canon only offer it in the 1 series. Spot metering, by its very nature, is intended to be used over multiple areas of the scene to assess an exposure, not as a single spot reading, yet this is exactly what linking it to a single AF point is likely to do, and so a degree of EC is likely to be required anyway, otherwise you could end up with a right royal hash in overall exposure of the image.
Oh. Spot metering regularly leads to a general overexposure of the scene. As a matter of fact when I use it it is for specific cases where the only way to get the subject exposed properly is to accept the blowing out of skies etc in really high contrast situations. Think a raven flying against a bright white sky. In cases like this it is a choice between one or the other. Generally however centre weighted average is the better compromise and evaluative works well when you are not shooting against a bright background OR you have really good front lighting on your subject giving your subject a decent brightness relative to the rest of the scene.
 
Nov 3, 2014
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Sometimes it is enough to get optimum exposure and sometimes, just like any reflective metering, it doesn't produce the exposure that you want, but the evaluation is linked to AF point, and as Sharlin says, it's easy enough to watch it happening. You're not on your own though in not realising that's it's been happening. I recon the majority of users don't realise !!

The metering and it's 'intelligence' is always getting better from generation to generation, and so I would expect the R5 to be better just as the future 5DV will be. It's interesting that Canon have chosen to highlight this in the R5 specs, maybe they too have realised no one knows about the feature. Certainly now, with my 5DS I really don't have to worry about getting a useable exposure, although I'm still one of those people that like to take an incident meter reading if feasible.

As I'm sure you are aware, Spot metering linked to a single AF point is a really dangerous way of metering and you have to be aware of its limitations, which is probably why Canon only offer it in the 1 series. Spot metering, by its very nature, is intended to be used over multiple areas of the scene to assess an exposure, not as a single spot reading, yet this is exactly what linking it to a single AF point is likely to do, and so a degree of EC is likely to be required anyway, otherwise you could end up with a right royal hash in overall exposure of the image.
I tried to explain all of this a few days ago but I don’t think I did a very good job because I got nowhere and the thread is still going. Your explanation is much more concise and on point than mine. Let’s see if you manage to be more convincing. I gave up after half a dozen posts.