What’s next from Canon?

Michael Clark

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Apr 5, 2016
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Thanks. Yes, that was clear. However, @Michael Clark was trying to make the point that ‘most of the US’ has more TV media viewing time than mobile media viewing time, which was his attempt to wiggle out of being wrong about the global situation. Of course, he was wrong about the US situation as well.

Or maybe he thinks his house is ‘most of the US’. Lol. Personally (as an irrelevant anecdote), in my house it’s not uncommon for my wife and I to be watching a show on a 4K TV while our three kids are each streaming something different on their mobile devices and the two other 4K TVs in the house are dark.

You're wrong about my house. There's not a single television even plugged into an electrical outlet at my house. The newest TV in the house is sitting in a closet. It is a 32" or 35" CRT that I would have gotten rid of years ago if I could do so without paying an arm and a leg to get a recycler to take it off my hands.
 
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Michael Clark

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Apr 5, 2016
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Indeed, though TV remains a significant platform (the difference is not ‘enormous’ as @lustyd suggests) mobile viewing took the majority position in the US in 2019 and has continued to increase (source):

US consumers’ average time spent on their phones will reach 4 hours, 31 minutes per day this year, a 2.5% increase YoY. As recently as 2018, the average US adult still spent more time per day with TV (3 hours, 42 minutes) than consuming media on mobile devices (3 hours, 27 minutes), a category that includes smartphones, feature phones, and tablets. But those positions switched in 2019 and have continued to diverge as mobile time surges and TV time falls. By 2023, the average US adult will spend a staggering 4 hours, 35 minutes per day consuming media on mobile devices and less than 3 hours (2 hours, 51 minutes) with TV.

Don’t expect @Michael Clark to admit that he’s wrong, though.

So you think every moment people spend on their phones is devoted to streaming professionally produced media programming? No time at all tweeting? No time spent on internet forums? No time devoted to any other nearly countless apps except YouTube, TikTok, Instagram, etc.? Sure, if you say so.
 
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Michael Clark

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Apr 5, 2016
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I question that. Many less developed nations never had the legacy telephone and television infrastructure of the U.S. and adopted cellular systems much more quickly, leapfrogging over the U.S. I’d be interested in data that supports your assertion, as I have a suspicion that in countries where there is less embedded infrastructure and fewer options people may be more reliant on cell phones for communications, internet access, entertainment and education.

Again, I'd agree with a lot of what you're saying. They did go cellular sooner, but didn't necessarily keep up with cutting edge improvements in data rates. The data networks in third world countries aren't near as fast as those in North America, Western Europe, and the more affluent areas on the Pacific rim like Japan, Australia, Hong Kong, Taiwan, etc. People I went to college and grad school with who've worked in such areas for extended periods of time bemoan the slow connections they're forced to use. Maybe Elon Musk's Starlink network is changing that for those who can afford it in such world areas, but the initial cost (about $600 USD) and monthly subscription (about $110 USD) is still well out of the reach for many in the world.
 
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Jul 21, 2010
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So you think every moment people spend on their phones is devoted to streaming professionally produced media programming? No time at all tweeting? No time spent on internet forums? No time devoted to any other nearly countless apps except YouTube, TikTok, Instagram, etc.? Sure, if you say so.
The discussion was about media consumption, which includes more than just ‘professionally produced’ content. The source I quoted (and cited) was talking about media consumption.

I know that you know this, you’re merely trying to restrict the discussion in yet another futile attempt to avoid admitting you’re wrong.

‘Moving the goalposts’ is a classic worm wiggle move. Another classic worm wiggle move is deflection, exemplified by your tangential post filled with irrelevant numbers about the age distribution of the population. The discussion is about how people consume media, not what age they are.

As I posted, more media is consumed on mobile devices than on TVs in the US, and has been since 2019. That directly refutes your statements. Do you post alternate data on media consumption to suppprt your assertions? No, you post irrelevant data on population age distribution.

Wiggle, wiggle, wiggle.
 
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unfocused

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I'd certainly agree with you about the college age and below demographic. I'm around a lot of high school kids that are the same way. That trend has really taken off in the past decade or so. 10-15 years ago the kids were still talking about tv shows and movies they went to see at the theater. But in the U.S., at least, roughly 68.5% of the population is age 25 or older. The median age is 38.31 years. There are also slightly more people in the U.S. age 50+ (117,838,030) than there are 25-49 (108,852,000) or 0-24 (104,312,620). So while the trend is heading in that direction, I don't think we've yet arrived there.
Except that media consumption is not evenly distributed by age.
 
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The data networks in third world countries aren't near as fast as those in North America
That's just not true. Sure, the US has a few pockets of good connectivity but they are and always have been behind the connectivity curve. Even with connectivity present the US has traditionally been hampered by bad data deals. What you refer to as "third world" almost certainly has better mobile provision since there is no fixed infrastructure, leaving mobile as the only connectivity. Consequently it tends to be quite good.
 
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The discussion was about media consumption, which includes more than just ‘professionally produced’ content.
I think this is a very important point, given the start of the thread. Professionally produced content using RED or Black Magic cameras or the like accounts for a tiny, tiny proportion of content consumed. These discussions always seem to centre around the need for more newer high end cameras when in fact the opposite is true. Canon might sell a few thousand R1 units, but they'd sell tens or hundreds of thousands of units of vlogging cameras. Flagship cameras are used to make sure people know and trust the brand, the profit comes from the scale of the ordinary cameras.
It's exactly the same in the gaming world, big name titles like HALO might take the headlines, but candy crush utterly obliterated it in terms of revenue, profit, MAUs, hours played, pretty much every metric you care to measure. The view of gamers being 16 year old boys in their bedrooms is outdated, gamers tend to be mid-20s women on their way to work. The same is true of video, a few people will attend the cinema but the vast majority of video content produced and consumed now is online low end stuff.
 
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Just hope Canon would replace the R5 with an updated version to fix all the bug-bears (but doubt that will be the case due to people still buying a flawed design (just have to wonder what testing was actually carried out!! and for how long). This has had me holding off for the last year or so and biting the bullet and replacing the 5DMKIII

So:
1. Same resolution but with Stacked Sensor to cut down on that rolling shutter
2. Redesign or fix the hot shoe issue of peeling off in your hands
3. Two of the same card slot
4. Seeing the video function is here to stay on a photographic camera - fix the heat dissipation issue (not just by the timer) for those that like to use it
5. Go to the longer lasting battery as per the R3
 
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unfocused

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Just hope Canon would replace the R5 with an updated version to fix all the bug-bears (but doubt that will be the case due to people still buying a flawed design (just have to wonder what testing was actually carried out!! and for how long). This has had me holding off for the last year or so and biting the bullet and replacing the 5DMKIII

So:
1. Same resolution but with Stacked Sensor to cut down on that rolling shutter
2. Redesign or fix the hot shoe issue of peeling off in your hands
3. Two of the same card slot
4. Seeing the video function is here to stay on a photographic camera - fix the heat dissipation issue (not just by the timer) for those that like to use it
5. Go to the longer lasting battery as per the R3
If you are waiting for these changes, you can expect to wait a long time.
 
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Jan 27, 2020
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Just hope Canon would replace the R5 with an updated version to fix all the bug-bears (but doubt that will be the case due to people still buying a flawed design (just have to wonder what testing was actually carried out!! and for how long). This has had me holding off for the last year or so and biting the bullet and replacing the 5DMKIII

So:
1. Same resolution but with Stacked Sensor to cut down on that rolling shutter
2. Redesign or fix the hot shoe issue of peeling off in your hands
3. Two of the same card slot
4. Seeing the video function is here to stay on a photographic camera - fix the heat dissipation issue (not just by the timer) for those that like to use it
5. Go to the longer lasting battery as per the R3
Your "flawed design" is a lot of people's favorite camera. The idea that Canon didn't do extensive testing is of course ridiculous.
 
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unfocused

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Yeah that extensive testing on overheating reaped the rewards. zzzzz
Canon screwed up the overheating. But, I believe that was a huge miscommunication between engineering and marketing. Marketing department was told to hype the 8k while engineering buried the overheating issue in a footnote. Still, for most users the problem was hugely overstated. Obviously Canon learned from their mistake and the R5 remains a fantastic camera.
 
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LogicExtremist

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Your "flawed design" is a lot of people's favorite camera. The idea that Canon didn't do extensive testing is of course ridiculous.
Of course lots of extensive testing was done on the R5 for many months! ;)
1. Pre-release marketing hype about 8K video to test how the market would respond to such an unqualified claim.
2. Selective release to loyal YouTube reviewers who would 'test' the cameras by making preview videos (infomercials) that were just citing product specs.
3. After a few weeks, allowing said select reviewers to 'test' performance by publishing photos and videos taken at a free holiday junket paid for Canon using carefully selected locations and sets with perfect conditions.
4. Slowly allowing other favourable YouTube sites to receive samples to 'test' the camera, as long as they play up the big specs and play down the shortcomings, otherwise no camera sample next time.
5. Objective and critical analysis by forum fanboys and brand loyalist who pre-ordered the cameras, who concluded after exhaustive testing that their new cameras definitively had no issues, such as overheating.
6. Ongoing, post product launch testing, where the aforementioned forum experts have consistently concluded that every alleged fault, be identified to be a hardware issue or a firmware update bug, is actually always a user error, irrespective of the photographer's actual skill or experience.

Totally agree, for anyone to suggest that the R5 wasn't extensively tested is really beyond the pale! :oops:
 
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LogicExtremist

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Sep 26, 2021
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Canon screwed up the overheating. But, I believe that was a huge miscommunication between engineering and marketing. Marketing department was told to hype the 8k while engineering buried the overheating issue in a footnote. Still, for most users the problem was hugely overstated. Obviously Canon learned from their mistake and the R5 remains a fantastic camera.
I think you mean "Obviously Canon learned from their mistake and released the EOS R5 C" ! ;)
 
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If you are waiting for these changes, you can expect to wait a long time.
exactly, and for those jumping on the 'flawed design' just a general wording that not everyone is going to agree on but when you have a professional camera and costing to boot and then being released with all the hype and still release a camera with the issue it had - shame on them!
I have been a canon owner since the release of the 350D love the 5DMKIII, but haters are going to hate and if you like your camera good for you....but it is a disgrace that large companies are releasing bodies at these prices with flaws they would know about (not talking about small niggles here) and hope all goes fine, yet the purchaser is the one suffering
 
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