Industry News

Latest sales data shows Canon maintains big market share lead in Japan for the year

Sales numbers for cameras and lenses tend to be freely available in Japan, which is something lacking in the rest of the world, especially Europe and North America.

BCNRetail has released its market share numbers for the 12 months between April 2018 through to March 2019.

Manufacturer market share leaderboard:

  1. Canon 37.3%
  2. Nikon 26.7%
  3. Sony 13.1%
  4. Olympus 6.0%
  5. Fujifilm 5.8%

Canon maintains a big lead in market share for cameras.

Year-over-year sales growth/decline leaderboard:

  1. Fujifilm +19.4%
  2. Canon -1.3%
  3. Sony -6.6%
  4. Olympus -13.8%
  5. Nikon -15.0%

Fujifilm was the big winner year-over-year, and Canon saw a slight decline in sales. Nikon had the biggest falloff.

You can check out the full report over at BCNRetail.

criscokkat

EOS RP
Sep 26, 2017
203
181
Madison, WI
In the Japanese market especially, there is always an underlying consumer motivation for owning the 'hot new product'.

Fujifilm deserves lots of praise for the innovations and packaging of their cameras, they've really been doing well an their sales growth is certainly reaping the benefits. However I think a certain percentage of the -6.6 percent for Sony is the wave of consumers seeing the praise for Fujifilm for the majority of the year and buying a camera from them, and not from sony which was the previous 'It' camera manufacturer. However this sales data ended before the firmware really hit for continuous eye focus and before the newer a6400. These numbers are the overall market, which is still 60-70% cameras under $1000. Obviously Nikon is the hardest hit in this market, especially since they have less of a presence at the low end.
 
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tmroper

EOS 80D
Sep 22, 2016
148
52
Fuji also just announced they'll be making ACROS film again. They do seem to have their finger on the pulse of actual consumers. And if they market the film as something like "just like the ACROS setting in your XT-1," that would be a bold and unique strategy.
 

Architect1776

Defining the poetics of space through Architecture
Aug 18, 2017
269
210
117
Williamsport, PA
Agreed about Nikon. They make some fine cameras and lenses. We need them to provide competition for Canon .
That is the position Sony is in now.
Nikon shot themselves in the foot when AF came of age and refused to give up on the old antiquated mount and just kept trying to patch things on to it. They have never recovered from that big mistake.
Canon with the RF mount kept all the features of the EF so owners don't get screwed where the Nikon Z mount leaves a lot of the dozen different F mount variants in the cold except for the latest few.
 
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unfocused

EOS 5D SR
I hope I'm not the only one to shed a bitter tear for Wonderful Sony:cry:
I have a hard time separating Sony the company from the Sony trolls who infest this site. I admit I take some delight in bad news for Sony simply because the Sony trolls are so annoying and irrational. Logically, I actually appreciate any company that pushes Canon to be more competitive.
 

BillB

EOS 6D MK II
May 11, 2017
1,050
285
I have a hard time separating Sony the company from the Sony trolls who infest this site. I admit I take some delight in bad news for Sony simply because the Sony trolls are so annoying and irrational. Logically, I actually appreciate any company that pushes Canon to be more competitive.
There is the issue of the extent to which Sony is supporting the trolling one way or another.
 

EduPortas

EOS T7i
Jul 1, 2015
88
39
These stats are irrelevant. It just shows general tendency of sales.

The truth is camera companies have been pushing their products upmarket
so as to get the biggest chunk of profit out of each individual sale.

This has been going on for years and has been well documented,
at least in Nikon's case, by Thom Hogan and interviews of Nikon's execs published at The Imaging Resource.

To follow their analogy, more fish are living in the same pond,
so each sale counts much more for the company's bottom line than what it did 10 years ago
during the DSLR boom. The pond has gotten smaller, so they are stuffing each camera model
with every posible feature to hit that maximum price range within their calculations.

Example: Nikon D500 and that $2,000 initial price release.

Market share shows little in that respect.
 

melgross

EOS RP
Nov 2, 2016
338
137
Don’t forget that when you sell tiny numbers, a big increase in percentage much easier than when you sell huge numbers. So Congrats to Fuji for increased sales, but they’re still way behind.

Canon ended the year there at about even. Not bad for a declining market. Major concern for Olympus and Nikon though. Can they reverse those drops?
 

unfocused

EOS 5D SR
I don't follow Olympus, but at a glance it looks like they might be the most at risk. Why? They start with a small share of the market like Fuji, but while Fuji is gaining ground in their niche, Olympus seems to be losing significant ground. Granted, the smaller share of the market you have, the more a drop in sales will be be magnified in your percentages.

There was a recent thread about a photographer who was dumped from the Canon Explorers program and went to Olympus. I wonder if Olympus is trying to carve out a niche among aging bird and wildlife photographers who are looking for an alternative to big, heavy full frame lenses and cameras. It might be a good strategy, but on the other hand, a $3,000 4/3rds camera is probably a difficult sell unless it's image quality is nothing short of miraculous.
 
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melgross

EOS RP
Nov 2, 2016
338
137
And, of course, nothing about that sad case, Pentax. For a while, there was an expectation, that after Hoys sold most of what they were to Ricoh, there would be a resurgence. But Ricoh seems not to care, or are living in a fantasy world. In a recent interview, they said that the believed that after a flirtation with mirrorless, some would come back to DSLRs, and so they were sticking with that.
 

criscokkat

EOS RP
Sep 26, 2017
203
181
Madison, WI
And, of course, nothing about that sad case, Pentax. For a while, there was an expectation, that after Hoys sold most of what they were to Ricoh, there would be a resurgence. But Ricoh seems not to care, or are living in a fantasy world. In a recent interview, they said that the believed that after a flirtation with mirrorless, some would come back to DSLRs, and so they were sticking with that.
i.e. why throw good money after bad? At this point whatever good name Pentax has had for decades has washed away for most people. Pentax had a shot at something like what Fujifilm is doing a decade ago, but it was floundered away. Hoya was only interested in the medical side of the business and by slowing down most development and laying off quite a large percentage of staff managed to not only kill the camera business before they could get a good price from selling it to another company, but managed to tank on the medical side by not having the money into it either.

It was just another example of short term gains on all sides - only people to come out ahead were financial firms like Fidelity who pushed for the merger and made a quick buck. The chairman of Hoya was dismissed by the board just hours before the merger was pushed through because he wouldn't go along with buying Pentax because he thought they were overpriced and they wouldn't have the money to grow the company after.
 

woodman411

EOS T7i
Aug 1, 2017
99
47
USA
... However this sales data ended before the firmware really hit for continuous eye focus and before the newer a6400...
I know, next year Sony's really going to take down Canon when [fill in the blank] comes out. You're right, firmwares will fix everything, never mind the a6400 (and a9, etc), what about the unannounced but inevitable a7000 and a10 Warthog edition?! And if that doesn't work, then wait, just wait, for the a8000 and a11 (and don't forget the a9000 and a12)! Another thing, losing 1% market share in a year means they'll have nothing in 100 years! Canon is doomed!
 
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melgross

EOS RP
Nov 2, 2016
338
137
i.e. why throw good money after bad? At this point whatever good name Pentax has had for decades has washed away for most people. Pentax had a shot at something like what Fujifilm is doing a decade ago, but it was floundered away. Hoya was only interested in the medical side of the business and by slowing down most development and laying off quite a large percentage of staff managed to not only kill the camera business before they could get a good price from selling it to another company, but managed to tank on the medical side by not having the money into it either.

It was just another example of short term gains on all sides - only people to come out ahead were financial firms like Fidelity who pushed for the merger and made a quick buck. The chairman of Hoya was dismissed by the board just hours before the merger was pushed through because he wouldn't go along with buying Pentax because he thought they were overpriced and they wouldn't have the money to grow the company after.
Yeah, as I said, a sad case. It was a great company when Honeywell imported them, so long ago. But I also think that Olympus is killing itself.
 

Hector1970

EOS 6D MK II
Mar 22, 2012
1,069
249
It's a pity its not broken down more. It would be interesting to see figures for Full Frame only. Canon have a bewildering array of low priced APS-C cameras which volume wise sell very well. As a Canon user a well performing Nikon and Sony is good for me. Competition drives innovation