Cinema EOS News

Canon Launches New Flagship XF705 Professional Camcorder Featuring 4K Video Recording at 60P/4:2:2/10-Bit

MELVILLE, N.Y., September 12, 2018 – Canon U.S.A. Inc., a leader in digital imaging solutions, today announced the new flagship model for the Company’s XF-series professional camcorders, the XF705. The camcorder features 4K (3840 x 2160) video shooting enabling users to record high-image quality at 60p/4:2:2/10-bit/HDR1 video to on-board SD cards. Ideal for broadcast and video production applications in addition to capturing video content at events and concerts, the 4K camcorder meets the needs of users who require high-quality video capture and more efficient video production workflows.

“The ability to capture high-quality video on-the-go in a compact and lightweight form factor is extremely valuable to videographers of all skill levels,” said Kazuto Ogawa, president and chief operating officer, Canon U.S.A., Inc. “This camcorder was designed to help professionals take their productions to the next level with 4K video recording and a wide-range of advanced features.”

The XF705 features an L-Series 15x optical zoom lens (35 mm film equivalent: 25.5 mm–382.5 mm), 1.0-inch CMOS sensor and a Dual DIGIC DV 6 image-processor providing greater image quality and performance. In addition, users can easily choose between two HDR formats—Hybrid Log-Gamma (HLG), ideal for such scenarios as broadcasting and live video transmission and Perceptual Quantization (PQ), which is well-suited during web transmission and film production. The camcorder features Canon’s newly developed XF-HEVC video format that enables users to record HDR video to SD cards while delivering a high compression ratio. It also allows HDR (internal SD card) and SDR (external recorder) simultaneous recording. Delivering smaller file sizes allows for more efficient workflows across various stages of the production process, from shooting to editing.

When shooting 4K video, focusing precision is vital, the XF705, featuring Canon’s revolutionary Dual Pixel CMOS AF2 enables users to maintain smooth autofocus operation through enhanced touch-panel operations. The XF705 meets a wide range of professional demands, with Canon Log 3, 12G-SDI, Built-in Wi-Fi, 4-channel audio, 3 density ND filter and 5 axis image stabilization for its 15x optical zoom lens. It is also compatible with the current leading non-linear editing software, as well as Canon XF Utility, a software that supports the new XF-HEVC video format, as well as XF-AVC and XF-MPEG, and is used for import, playing back and managing video data as well as cropping still-image data.

Availability and Pricing

The Canon XF705 professional camcorder is scheduled to be available in December 2018 with a suggested retail price of $6,999.00*. Additional CA-CP200 L power adapters are available for purchase as well with a suggested retail price of $285.00*. For more information, please visit usa.canon.com.

Sep 12, 2018
3
7
#2
Looks like a fantastic little camera and in my opinion Canon will likely sell many many more of these than they ever will Cinema EOS cameras. Just cant fathom why it has taken so long to release!

We have used many many cameras over the years but arguably from business standpoint, our Canon XF305 has made us more money than any other. Ours is 10 years old - it has never been serviced and has never once let us down. It has been baked in deserts, it has been dropped (not intentionally), it has been soaked on many many occasions and it has never failed. Only criticism I have is its low light performance and associated noisy pictures.

For the haters out there - yes, you may look at this camera and think it's disappointing. It's certainly not sexy and won't deliver cinematic footage but that wasn't Canon's brief here.

Remember what this camera is built for. Run and gun broadcast television documentary and news production. It's a tough work-horse, not designed to compete with the current generation of shallow DOF large sensor cinema style cameras.

Need to get a shot very quickly, guaranteed to be in focus, properly exposed, shot to full broadcast standard? You'd grab this before you ever would a C200 or C300 Mk2...or at least I would :eek:)

The BBC had input into this cameras development as they did with its predecessor the XF305 which became almost a industry standard for documentary production along with Sony's EX1.

The new XF-HEVC codec could be a game changer as it will allow you to shoot 4K at 60 Mb/s, just slightly higher than the current 50 Mb/s broadcast standard HD codecs. This will allow easy re-framing of footage for HD delivery.

We now have two cameras ready to do battle for the docs/news camera crown - it's going to be the Canon XF-705 v the Sony PXW-Z280.

Anyone for a shoot-out?
 
Jun 14, 2018
30
9
Switzerland
#3
I think it is important to note that the sensor size is 1inch and that the resolution is pretty much exactly 4K which allows for the 1:1 readout which currently results in the crop in the 5Dmk4 and R bodies. If Canon released the R with an 8MP sensor, I doubt stills photographers would be happy. Thus, I am pretty sure that the firm is sensor-limited in terms of the readout of the 5Dmk4-class sensor. While it does have more capable sensors like on the C700FF, the price is way higher. If it were just a 'not enough processing power' to downsample to 4K, then Canon would have placed a second Digic8. Then again, this would have created an unacceptable level of power draw thus reducing operational autonomy. Design is always finding a balance between several factors. The initial R will probably be great for lots of amateurs. It is not designed for the most demanding or niche use cases, however.
 
Likes: FramerMCB
Sep 12, 2018
3
7
#5
The new XF-HEVC codec could be a game changer as it will allow you to shoot 4K at 60 Mb/s, just slightly higher than the current 50 Mb/s broadcast standard HD codecs. This will allow easy re-framing of footage for HD delivery.
Oops, just realised I should have said 160 Mb/s here, so approx. 3 x HD data rate
 
Sep 16, 2016
19
14
Mars
#6
I have a feeling that HLG and XF-HEVC will eventually come to an EOS R series camera. While CinemaRaw Lite will become an exclusive Cinema EOS feature and one of the main feature differentiators between it and the EOS R.
 
Aug 19, 2018
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#7
Nice camcorder. I'm just hoping Canon will release the C100 mk3 soon and drop some of the XF705 tech inside it. I don't need 4k yet, I'm happier with oversampled 1080p and the super35 sensor. But I'd like to see super slow-motion capabilities for 1080p in the C100 mk3 by getting frame rates of 240fps. Dual UHS-II card slots would be nice. The 10-bit 4:4:2 recording would be nice upgrade. And an RF mount would be pretty awesome too.
 
Likes: SilverBox

transpo1

EOS Rebel SL2
Jan 12, 2011
608
29
#10
6990 not so bad. All you 4k/60 whiners go buy it and leave our stills cameras in peace.
Actually, I think $7K for 4K 60p 2018 is rather expensive. But this seems like a great tool for video broadcasters and run and gun folks and I’m glad that people who need this kind of tool now have it. I haven’t used this type of cam in 8 years, so it’s not for me.

Canon is in the minority of OEMs by not putting high quality 4K video into its high end prosumer stills cameras so that would make you in the minority of not wanting a hybrid solution.
 
Jun 12, 2018
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#12
I have to admit that i have no clue about video cameras.. but: has the "kink" in the body something to do with ergonomics when you sit it on your shoulder? It looks rather strange..
 
Jun 6, 2012
196
20
#13
Looks like a fantastic little camera and in my opinion Canon will likely sell many many more of these than they ever will Cinema EOS cameras. Just cant fathom why it has taken so long to release!

We have used many many cameras over the years but arguably from business standpoint, our Canon XF305 has made us more money than any other. Ours is 10 years old - it has never been serviced and has never once let us down. It has been baked in deserts, it has been dropped (not intentionally), it has been soaked on many many occasions and it has never failed. Only criticism I have is its low light performance and associated noisy pictures.

For the haters out there - yes, you may look at this camera and think it's disappointing. It's certainly not sexy and won't deliver cinematic footage but that wasn't Canon's brief here.

Remember what this camera is built for. Run and gun broadcast television documentary and news production. It's a tough work-horse, not designed to compete with the current generation of shallow DOF large sensor cinema style cameras.

Need to get a shot very quickly, guaranteed to be in focus, properly exposed, shot to full broadcast standard? You'd grab this before you ever would a C200 or C300 Mk2...or at least I would :eek:)

The BBC had input into this cameras development as they did with its predecessor the XF305 which became almost a industry standard for documentary production along with Sony's EX1.

The new XF-HEVC codec could be a game changer as it will allow you to shoot 4K at 60 Mb/s, just slightly higher than the current 50 Mb/s broadcast standard HD codecs. This will allow easy re-framing of footage for HD delivery.

We now have two cameras ready to do battle for the docs/news camera crown - it's going to be the Canon XF-705 v the Sony PXW-Z280.

Anyone for a shoot-out?
I have yet to see anyone with these types of cameras. I was actually going to ask, who buy these.
 
Apr 23, 2018
1,061
144
#17
Canon is in the minority of OEMs by not putting high quality 4K video into its high end prosumer stills cameras so that would make you in the minority of not wanting a hybrid solution.
no logic in your sentence. I bet only 10% of stills camera purchasers really would want hybrid stills/video capability IF THEY HAD TO PAY FOR IT. They are just free-riders who want it for free. I am rather happy that Canon denies them their wish to a large extent and f's them over with crippled video stuff in stills cameras.
 
Jul 1, 2015
60
1
#19
Most of the cost of this model is linked to its massive "L" lens. No other Canon ENG camera uses this particular type of glass.

Shame they are no longer using a three sensor system, like the older XF300.
Apparently, that's what really made that camera standout (and its particular "L" zoom, of course)

It's also worth noting that this is the SDI model with a bunch of other accoutrements
for studio crews. We should see a slightly less expensive model without the SDI connectors, as per usual.

It's expensive, but, like most Canon products, it creates it's own niche. There's
no other Canon product like this out there and professionals know this.
 

transpo1

EOS Rebel SL2
Jan 12, 2011
608
29
#20
no logic in your sentence. I bet only 10% of stills camera purchasers really would want hybrid stills/video capability IF THEY HAD TO PAY FOR IT. They are just free-riders who want it for free. I am rather happy that Canon denies them their wish to a large extent and f's them over with crippled video stuff in stills cameras.
Haha. I’ve got news for you: they are already paying for it by buying Sony FF MILCs, Nikon D850s and Panasonics and Fujis. Canon is only hurting itself in the long run by not staying competitive with this hybrid capability.

So, definitely no logic in your statement and a lot of biased emotion. It’s clear you’re insecure with adding capabilities to your cameras that you don’t know how or care to use. It really doesn’t subtract any stills capability from your photography, so again, no logic to your statement here.