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Canon U.S.A., Inc. Focuses on Consumer Safety with an Anti-Counterfeit Consumer Education Microsite Update

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MELVILLE, NY, August 9, 2021 – Canon U.S.A., Inc., a leader in digital imaging solutions, is taking the opportunity to spotlight its commitment to anti-counterfeit consumer education and safety awareness. Canon has a longstanding commitment to fight against the proliferation of counterfeit Canon products by helping to protect customers from receiving non-Canon products that are hazardous and can cause damage to their equipment. As part of this effort, Canon has updated its anti-counterfeit consumer education microsite, providing expanded information about commonly counterfeited Canon products, as well as informing consumers about the battery recognition technology that is built into certain Canon cameras and camcorders. The website can be found at usa.canon.com/aboutcounterfeits.

With the surge of online shopping, the availability of counterfeits for many brands has persisted and grown, leaving consumers unaware about counterfeits and unable to make informed purchasing decisions. The Canon anti-counterfeit consumer education microsite includes updated tips on how to spot counterfeits that unlawfully bear the Canon logo as well as a discussion about the difference between gray market and counterfeit goods for consumers who may not know how to distinguish between them. The microsite also offers consumers handy links to anti-counterfeit product advisories and resources, as well as a link to some valuable information that Canon provides to its consumers concerning another form of fakery being offered to the public– some service and support companies passing themselves off as authorized Canon repair facilities.

Canon promotes safety by partnering with its consumers and sharing technical expertise. On the microsite, U.S. consumers are encouraged to use Canon U.S.A’s most important safety education tool – its anti-counterfeit hotline at 1-855-46-CANON – that allows Canon consumers to report suspicious Canon goods so that they can be authenticated by Canon before use.

“At Canon, we have invested deeply to ensure our technical staff is thoroughly trained and well equipped with the knowledge and tools required to properly identify non-genuine merchandise. The specific combination of our formal processes, access to proprietary manufacturing attributes, training, and tools available exclusively to our Canon service staff, allows us to discern even the most intricate differences between genuine and non-genuine items,” says Jason Fligman, Senior Director & General Manager of Customer Support Operations for the Imaging Technologies and Communications Group at Canon U.S.A., Inc. “We are very aware of the quality and safety issues that are common amongst counterfeit Canon products, and committed to assisting our valued customers in ensuring the authenticity of Canon-branded items.”

Canon encourages consumers who seek to buy genuine Canon products to purchase them through authorized dealers by using a dealer locator link on Canon’s website or through a brand-based online store, such as Canon Direct. Canon also pursues counterfeiters in the U.S. and around the world to protect its customers from potentially unsafe products that unlawfully use the Canon name, as well as to protect the value, trusted reputation, and loyalty that the Canon brand has acquired over decades in producing high-quality, safe and reliable products.

InchMetric

Switched from Nikon. Still zooming the wrong way.
CR Pro
Jun 22, 2021
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Ya gotta love corporate PR. This is to tell us that they have a new way of telling us that they are doing what they have always done to protect their business.
 
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InchMetric

Switched from Nikon. Still zooming the wrong way.
CR Pro
Jun 22, 2021
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There are definitely fake Powershots going around but I have not come across any fake EOS cameras.
That does not mean they don't exist.
This sounds more like they're protecting their market for opulently-priced batteries.
 
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Juangrande

EOS 90D
Mar 6, 2017
169
222
This sounds more like they're protecting their market for opulently-priced batteries.
I’ve bought a 3rd party battery and gotten a third party replacement from Best Buy that they assured was the performance equivalent of an original Canon battery and I can assure they are not. Canon EOS bodies (I don’t know anything about the consumer models) have a battery performance diagnostic in the menus. I got my Canon battery and 3rd party at the same time and used them together on jobs. The 3rd party battery after time would only charge to 75% and took much longer to complete the charging even though it was only 75% I had the same experience with another 3rd party brand. So I’m convinced and only use Canon batteries.
 

Del Paso

M3 Singlestroke
Aug 9, 2018
1,242
1,315
This sounds more like they're protecting their market for opulently-priced batteries.
I've always found it funny to spend thousands and thousands on cameras and lenses, and then to buy cheap batteries to save a few bucks.
How often do I see BMWs, Mercedes - Benz, even Porsches fitted with the cheapest Chinese tires...
I once even dealt with a millionaire who proudly told me he filled his rental's tank with regular instead of premium. The car was an AMG.
No comment...
 

AlanF

Stay at home
CR Pro
Aug 16, 2012
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I've always found it funny to spend thousands and thousands on cameras and lenses, and then to buy cheap batteries to save a few bucks.
How often do I see BMWs, Mercedes - Benz, even Porsches fitted with the cheapest Chinese tires...
I once even dealt with a millionaire who proudly told me he filled his rental's tank with regular instead of premium. The car was an AMG.
No comment...
That's how be became a millionaire...
 

unfocused

EOS-1D X Mark III
Jul 20, 2010
6,235
3,662
67
Springfield, IL
www.mgordoncommunications.com
I've always found it funny to spend thousands and thousands on cameras and lenses, and then to buy cheap batteries to save a few bucks.
How often do I see BMWs, Mercedes - Benz, even Porsches fitted with the cheapest Chinese tires...
I once even dealt with a millionaire who proudly told me he filled his rental's tank with regular instead of premium. The car was an AMG.
No comment...

That's how be became a millionaire...
It didn't hurt that he was renting the car, charging it off as a business expense, reducing his income and avoiding taxes. Buy-Borrow-Die.
 
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entoman

wildlife photography
May 8, 2015
254
228
UK
I’ve bought a 3rd party battery and gotten a third party replacement from Best Buy that they assured was the performance equivalent of an original Canon battery and I can assure they are not. Canon EOS bodies (I don’t know anything about the consumer models) have a battery performance diagnostic in the menus. I got my Canon battery and 3rd party at the same time and used them together on jobs. The 3rd party battery after time would only charge to 75% and took much longer to complete the charging even though it was only 75% I had the same experience with another 3rd party brand. So I’m convinced and only use Canon batteries.
I've had the same experience with 3rd party batteries - they are usually fine for 6 months or so, but after that they rapidly lose their ability to hold charge. But they are a *hell* of a sight cheaper than genuine Canon batteries - the price of batteries for my R5 in the UK is ludicrous. It could be argued that it makes more sense to buy 6 third-party batteries, than to buy ONE Canon battery.

Having said that, I use genuine Canon batteries myself just because I don't want to run the risk of finding that a third-party battery is rejected by the camera. My R5 actually rejects genuine Canon LP6-E batteries that work fine in my 5DMkiv, although it is happy enough with LP6-EN and of course with LP6ENH.

My biggest complaint is that even the latest Canon batteries are only good for 300 shots maximum in the R5 under my usage, although they're good enough for over 1000 shots in the 5DMkiv. Swapping batteries 3 times a day can be a real pain. Of course this is a problem with the efficiency of the electronics in the camera, rather than with the batteries themselves.
 

Juangrande

EOS 90D
Mar 6, 2017
169
222
I've had the same experience with 3rd party batteries - they are usually fine for 6 months or so, but after that they rapidly lose their ability to hold charge. But they are a *hell* of a sight cheaper than genuine Canon batteries - the price of batteries for my R5 in the UK is ludicrous. It could be argued that it makes more sense to buy 6 third-party batteries, than to buy ONE Canon battery.

Having said that, I use genuine Canon batteries myself just because I don't want to run the risk of finding that a third-party battery is rejected by the camera. My R5 actually rejects genuine Canon LP6-E batteries that work fine in my 5DMkiv, although it is happy enough with LP6-EN and of course with LP6ENH.

My biggest complaint is that even the latest Canon batteries are only good for 300 shots maximum in the R5 under my usage, although they're good enough for over 1000 shots in the 5DMkiv. Swapping batteries 3 times a day can be a real pain. Of course this is a problem with the efficiency of the electronics in the camera, rather than with the batteries themselves.
I have the R5 as well. I turned off preview so I have to press play > to see the image and helps me to chimp less. You could just limit it to 2 seconds. I’ve turned off viewfinder preview and turned off AF always on (drains battery). I believe you can find posts /YouTube content with battery saving tips. The very accurate eye AF and WYSIWYG viewfinder eliminates the need to constantly chimp like on older bodies. I’ve learned to trust the camera like in the film days. The less previews the longer the battery life.
 

entoman

wildlife photography
May 8, 2015
254
228
UK
I have the R5 as well. I turned off preview so I have to press play > to see the image and helps me to chimp less. You could just limit it to 2 seconds. I’ve turned off viewfinder preview and turned off AF always on (drains battery). I believe you can find posts /YouTube content with battery saving tips. The very accurate eye AF and WYSIWYG viewfinder eliminates the need to constantly chimp like on older bodies. I’ve learned to trust the camera like in the film days. The less previews the longer the battery life.
Agreed there are many ways to minimise battery consumption. I've turned off everything that I don't absolutely need, I've got the metering and EVF timers etc all set to the minimum, and I rarely chimp. Part of the problem is the lenses - I'm using mostly EF glass, particularly macros and telezooms, and these place a heavy drain on batteries due to the motors having to move the heavy elements over a relatively long distance (even with focus limiters on). Im also shooting wild animals, insects and birds, which often means keeping the shutter half pressed in C-AF while waiting for the action to unfold. I think the only answer in my circumstances is to get a battery grip...
 
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neuroanatomist

I post too Much on Here!!
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Jul 21, 2010
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This sounds more like they're protecting their market for opulently-priced batteries.
That whooshing sound was the point flying over your head. Look up the word counterfeit. This isn’t about cheaper 3rd party batteries like those from Wasabi or the ‘CB-E6N’ by Vivitar (with ‘Vivitar’ printed on it) that came as a second battery in my EOS R bundle. This is about batteries (and other products) that are labeled with the Canon logo but not made under Canon’s control, to their specifications.

Some time back there was a spate of counterfeit B+W filters. Cheap glass in a soft metal ring with realistic printing on the edge. They’re still out there, that’s why I get mine from B&H or Adorama, and I won’t buy filters through Amazon (the ‘sold by Amazon’ ones were bought by Amazon from B+W, but Amazon co-mingles their stock with that of 3rd party sellers that may include counterfeit products).
 
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Kit Chan

I'm New Here
Sep 7, 2020
23
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"helping to protect customers from receiving non-Canon products that are hazardous and can cause damage to their equipment."

This reminds me of that anti right to repair fearmongering ad where someone changed a AA battery in their device and some countdown timer played and then his pocket exploded.

That being said, I am always cautious to look for trustworthy brands when it comes to anything power delivery. Some people have had their computer catch fire because they used a cheap GPU power cable that didn't use thick enough wire for the power passing through.
 

degos

EOS RP
Mar 20, 2015
420
355
I've always found it funny to spend thousands and thousands on cameras and lenses, and then to buy cheap batteries to save a few bucks.
I've always found it appalling to spend thousands on a camera and receive just a single battery in the package. Especially something like the 1D series with its two-slot battery charger...
 

Del Paso

M3 Singlestroke
Aug 9, 2018
1,242
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I've always found it appalling to spend thousands on a camera and receive just a single battery in the package. Especially something like the 1D series with its two-slot battery charger...
I understand.
But would it justify putting a $6000 1DX III at risk with cheap or counterfeit batteries? Melting lithium batteries are no fun...
 

InchMetric

Switched from Nikon. Still zooming the wrong way.
CR Pro
Jun 22, 2021
130
131
I've always found it funny to spend thousands and thousands on cameras and lenses, and then to buy cheap batteries to save a few bucks.
How often do I see BMWs, Mercedes - Benz, even Porsches fitted with the cheapest Chinese tires...
I once even dealt with a millionaire who proudly told me he filled his rental's tank with regular instead of premium. The car was an AMG.
No comment...

The "opulent" pricing of premium fuel was fun to learn about.

First, there is no risk of damage using lower octane fuel in a modern vehicle. The computers adjust timing to avoid any premature detonation ("knock").

Second, the performance differences are minimal (tenth of a second in an acceleration test really matter to you enough to increase your fuel bill by a big percentage?)

Third, you're not willingly putting ethanol in your car without knowing the effects, are you?
 

neuroanatomist

I post too Much on Here!!
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Jul 21, 2010
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"helping to protect customers from receiving non-Canon products that are hazardous and can cause damage to their equipment."

This reminds me of that anti right to repair fearmongering ad where someone changed a AA battery in their device and some countdown timer played and then his pocket exploded.
Again, the point is counterfeit products. As in, someone bought a AA battery that looked exactly like a Duracell, but was actually made by Charlie's Cheap Coppertops using contaminated materials, and that battery exploded.
 
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Del Paso

M3 Singlestroke
Aug 9, 2018
1,242
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The "opulent" pricing of premium fuel was fun to learn about.

First, there is no risk of damage using lower octane fuel in a modern vehicle. The computers adjust timing to avoid any premature detonation ("knock").

Second, the performance differences are minimal (tenth of a second in an acceleration test really matter to you enough to increase your fuel bill by a big percentage?)

Third, you're not willingly putting ethanol in your car without knowing the effects, are you?
I'll have to disagree!
The anti-knock sensor indeed does adjust the ignition timing on every new car. Yet, it first has to interpret a few "knocking-cycles" before it does adapt to low-fuel quality. This harms the con-rod bearings and the pistons.
AMGs MUST be run (can be a warranty issue) in Europe on 98 ROZ ("Superplus), which has a much higher octane rating than what you get in the US, regular being comparable. Engine damages were not frequent, but could occur when no adequate fuel had been used in conjunction with high speed driving.
But let us now turn back to "counterfeiting", which is indeed an issue.:)
And sorry for the detour...