Latest sales data shows Canon maintains big market share lead in Japan for the year

Expat Photographer

I'm New Here
Nov 4, 2018
19
22
That is the position Sony is in now.
Nikon shot themselves in the foot when AF came of age and refused to give up on the old antiquated mount and just kept trying to patch things on to it. They have never recovered from that big mistake.
Canon with the RF mount kept all the features of the EF so owners don't get screwed where the Nikon Z mount leaves a lot of the dozen different F mount variants in the cold except for the latest few.
That's not at all what happened in Nikon. Shipment volume is down double digits for Nikon for the last two years, primarily because of the restructuring. It had nothing to do with mount and eye AF, obviously. This year's sales value for Nikon was off 28.5%, which would be after any possible mount issue.

Again, financial news of companies need financial sources. You can't make up facts about a company's fiscal health because you do or not like feature X of a camera.

The D850 bounce is done, but their logistics and chip issues, which were key in driving them into the red, are better but still in bad shape. Nikon's blamed the earthquake for too long, manufacturing and logistics operating at the level of a third rate company is killing them and completely inexcusable. The recall makes it clear that they STILL haven't been able to increase quality assurance to keep pace with lagging manufacturing ramping.

Ushida and Umatate should have gone away, not up.
 

Jethro

EOS R
Jul 14, 2018
241
116
and the rest of the world?
... is a pretty closely guarded commercial secret. People try to extrapolate from revenue changes (to the extent they announce them per operating division) but its more guesswork than anything else.
 

Expat Photographer

I'm New Here
Nov 4, 2018
19
22
i.e. why throw good money after bad? At this point whatever good name Pentax has had for decades has washed away for most people. Pentax had a shot at something like what Fujifilm is doing a decade ago, but it was floundered away. Hoya was only interested in the medical side of the business and by slowing down most development and laying off quite a large percentage of staff managed to not only kill the camera business before they could get a good price from selling it to another company, but managed to tank on the medical side by not having the money into it either.

It was just another example of short term gains on all sides - only people to come out ahead were financial firms like Fidelity who pushed for the merger and made a quick buck. The chairman of Hoya was dismissed by the board just hours before the merger was pushed through because he wouldn't go along with buying Pentax because he thought they were overpriced and they wouldn't have the money to grow the company after.
???

I'm confused.

Sparx, who was a bigger shareholder than Fidelity, along with Fidelity, didn't push for the stock swap. Along with Watanuki they did NOT support the swap, but agreed to the tender offer, which of course Sparx and Fidelity did push for (it was a good deal).

Urano pushed for the original deal, and resigned, but he worked for Pentax of course.

The director of Hoya at the time was Hiroshi Suzuki. He's still the director. Suzuki wasn't against the deal, it was his 'baby'. He was hyped to bring 'western' style governance to the acquisition. The board didn't fire him, he's been at the post since 2003. Hoya had fantastic liquidity, with a very nice cash stockpile of over $100 billion yen at the time. No one anywhere thought they'd be short on cash after the deal.

???
 

Del Paso

M3 Singlestroke
Aug 9, 2018
560
537
I have a hard time separating Sony the company from the Sony trolls who infest this site. I admit I take some delight in bad news for Sony simply because the Sony trolls are so annoying and irrational. Logically, I actually appreciate any company that pushes Canon to be more competitive.
I totally agree as to the benefits of competition, no matter by whom.:)
 

Stuart

Hi, Welcome from an ePhotozine fan, & 6D user.
Jul 22, 2010
286
48
London & Woking
www.ephotozine.com
Yeah, as I said, a sad case. It was a great company when Honeywell imported them, so long ago. But I also think that Olympus is killing itself.
Olympus here in the UK is a true marketing animal, always sponsoring events, releasing neat features and promoting ambassadors, they talk an amazing game and seem to be the most hungry of all major manufacturers.
 

criscokkat

EOS RP
Sep 26, 2017
269
238
Madison, WI
I know, next year Sony's really going to take down Canon when [fill in the blank] comes out. You're right, firmwares will fix everything, never mind the a6400 (and a9, etc), what about the unannounced but inevitable a7000 and a10 Warthog edition?! And if that doesn't work, then wait, just wait, for the a8000 and a11 (and don't forget the a9000 and a12)! Another thing, losing 1% market share in a year means they'll have nothing in 100 years! Canon is doomed!
I never said anything about taking down Canon, I was talking about Sony's 6.6 percent drop. In this market year of april 2018-march 2019 Sony never released a new sub 1000 dollar camera. Before the a6400 was released, the last aps-c camera released was in 2016. The vast majority of sales in the metric we are discussing comes from sub $1000 cameras. In the Japanese market in particular this means less sales, because newest = best in many Japanese consumer's eyes. Their share of the market as tracked b this metric will probably improve next year simply because the a6400 will be tracked, presumably the a7000 as well, along with whatever full frame cameras (which sell in much smaller quantities). The firmware updates just keep the a7III from sliding as much month to month, which is remarkable because it's selling at a rate that is comparable with the sub 1k cameras even though it costs twice that.

Canon will be fine. Nikon and Olympus might not be, although both of them have a long tail. 20 years from now Nikon could very well be where Pentax is now, especially if they can't get a handle on their fabrication and logistics issues as others have pointed out.
 

criscokkat

EOS RP
Sep 26, 2017
269
238
Madison, WI
???

I'm confused.

Sparx, who was a bigger shareholder than Fidelity, along with Fidelity, didn't push for the stock swap. Along with Watanuki they did NOT support the swap, but agreed to the tender offer, which of course Sparx and Fidelity did push for (it was a good deal).

Urano pushed for the original deal, and resigned, but he worked for Pentax of course.

The director of Hoya at the time was Hiroshi Suzuki. He's still the director. Suzuki wasn't against the deal, it was his 'baby'. He was hyped to bring 'western' style governance to the acquisition. The board didn't fire him, he's been at the post since 2003. Hoya had fantastic liquidity, with a very nice cash stockpile of over $100 billion yen at the time. No one anywhere thought they'd be short on cash after the deal.

???
You are right, I had which company's board president resigned backwards, it was on the pentax side. But I know several years after the fact there was a series of articles from the son of the Hoya president that talked about that being the worst investment ever, and they did not have the capital to drive the investments that were needed to make the merger successful.
 

Expat Photographer

I'm New Here
Nov 4, 2018
19
22
I never said anything about taking down Canon, I was talking about Sony's 6.6 percent drop. In this market year of april 2018-march 2019 Sony never released a new sub 1000 dollar camera. Before the a6400 was released, the last aps-c camera released was in 2016. The vast majority of sales in the metric we are discussing comes from sub $1000 cameras. In the Japanese market in particular this means less sales, because newest = best in many Japanese consumer's eyes. Their share of the market as tracked b this metric will probably improve next year simply because the a6400 will be tracked, presumably the a7000 as well, along with whatever full frame cameras (which sell in much smaller quantities). The firmware updates just keep the a7III from sliding as much month to month, which is remarkable because it's selling at a rate that is comparable with the sub 1k cameras even though it costs twice that.

Canon will be fine. Nikon and Olympus might not be, although both of them have a long tail. 20 years from now Nikon could very well be where Pentax is now, especially if they can't get a handle on their fabrication and logistics issues as others have pointed out.

What do you think the odds are, of Nikon being in the position Pentax is now, in 20 years?

One moment I think 'no way, not Nikon'. Ten minutes later I think 'yeah, they're screwed'. lol

15 years ago they had the very same problems they still have today. A decade and a half later, a restructured company, and the only significant change is that they lost market share?

It just baffles me that Nikon can't figure this out.
 

mpb001

EOS T7i
Sep 10, 2016
69
54
Sony can have the amateur market. Canon will continue to reign king over the advanced amateur and professional markets.