2 Lenses for Cinque Terre, Italy?

Luds34

EOS R
May 15, 2014
918
0
Cory said:
I think, too, it's gonna be the 10-18, 24 STM and 40 STM.
I know I'm late to the party but I just wanted to give you a thumbs up on your choice of a 2 lens, very light kit. When I want to go light (packing just 2 lenses) I go the same route. One ultra wide, and then a ~35mm (FF equiv) fast prime. With cities and scenery I never miss a telephoto lens.

Have a great trip and share some pics! :)
 

Luds34

EOS R
May 15, 2014
918
0
Cory said:
Since I'm still at the top - Would you think that a 24mm STM and Canon 85 1.8 would cover most? The 24 for most everything and the 85 for people?
Thanks.
On crop 85mm becomes pretty long and compressed. You are really going to lose context and surrounding shooting with the lens. You'll also get massive bokeh. People will have a hard time telling where you are.

I just got back from a vacation to Asia where I packed 12mm, 18mm, and 35mm primes on crop. The 35mm was by far the least used lens. You're in these gorgeous, unique places, shooting people shots with a little context is key.

I think the 24mm STM is a great choice. However I think you'll miss having something wider, I know I would. The 10-18mm STM I still think is a great choice and a lens you're going to want in your bag.

But in the end it is to each their own and everyone has a little different shooting style. Ultimately you know best what you want to accomplish. Either way I applaud your route of going with a lighter, smaller travel kit. I personally feel too often we can burden ourselves down with too much gear when we travel.
 

ahsanford

Particular Member
Aug 16, 2012
8,617
1,642
Luds34 said:
On crop 85mm becomes pretty long and compressed. You are really going to lose context and surrounding shooting with the lens. You'll also get massive bokeh. People will have a hard time telling where you are.

I just got back from a vacation to Asia where I packed 12mm, 18mm, and 35mm primes on crop. The 35mm was by far the least used lens. You're in these gorgeous, unique places, shooting people shots with a little context is key.
I agree 100% with you -- I predominantly shoot between 16-50mm (FF) when I travel.

But there is a contingent of travel folks who pack a 70-200/70-300 'provide a little context' for something far away.

So bringing portrait glass on vaca to shoot faces at portrait apertures/distances will indeed remove the context/locale from shot. But using that same lens to fill the frame with a far off church steeple, mountain peak, landmark, etc. is 100% in-context, locally identifiable and useful.

Despite this, I still don't pack that longer glass when I travel to keep size and weight down.

- A
 

LDS

EOS 5D Mark IV
Sep 14, 2012
1,696
233
ahsanford said:
But there is a contingent of travel folks who pack a 70-200/70-300
From a good vantage point, a tele can provide interesting images and still retain the context - but mostly on the longer end.

Still, I find them too too large and heavy for a short vacation when photos are not the main aim.
 

Luds34

EOS R
May 15, 2014
918
0
ahsanford said:
Luds34 said:
On crop 85mm becomes pretty long and compressed. You are really going to lose context and surrounding shooting with the lens. You'll also get massive bokeh. People will have a hard time telling where you are.

I just got back from a vacation to Asia where I packed 12mm, 18mm, and 35mm primes on crop. The 35mm was by far the least used lens. You're in these gorgeous, unique places, shooting people shots with a little context is key.
I agree 100% with you -- I predominantly shoot between 16-50mm (FF) when I travel.

But there is a contingent of travel folks who pack a 70-200/70-300 'provide a little context' for something far away.

So bringing portrait glass on vaca to shoot faces at portrait apertures/distances will indeed remove the context/locale from shot. But using that same lens to fill the frame with a far off church steeple, mountain peak, landmark, etc. is 100% in-context, locally identifiable and useful.

Despite this, I still don't pack that longer glass when I travel to keep size and weight down.

- A
Absolutely. I personally don't find myself missing that so much, especially visiting cities and such, but I agree many others like to have that handy.

And 85mm has some reach on crop. Especially if you allow cropping the image some, an 85mm could help bring some of those distance subjects into the frame. Especially with it's small size, might be worth leaving in the bag. I just would recommend against making it my "pictures of my family" lens while visiting some place as cool as Italy for the points I made above about subject context.
 

Cory

EOS RP
Oct 20, 2012
553
3
Yardley, PA
youtube.com
figaro28 said:
This does not answer the OP question, but what about just taking the 15-85? What do you think?
That doesn't not answer it. Many/most really seem to like that one. I just feel like I get that unique/signature look from primes whereas zooms (even if very sharp) just don't allow the unique look that I strive for. Maybe I'm wrong or maybe I just work better with primes; mostly.
Might be the "best" one-lens solution though.
 
Feb 28, 2017
8
0
Cory said:
figaro28 said:
This does not answer the OP question, but what about just taking the 15-85? What do you think?
That doesn't not answer it. Many/most really seem to like that one. I just feel like I get that unique/signature look from primes whereas zooms (even if very sharp) just don't allow the unique look that I strive for. Maybe I'm wrong or maybe I just work better with primes; mostly.
Might be the "best" one-lens solution though.
I also work better with primes. I spent more than ten years taking fine pictures just with a 52mm Hexanon (I was born in 1960). Nevertheless, for me zooms are indispensable just if you need to travel light, or if you need an affordable UWA on EF-S (I love the 10-18).
 
Jul 12, 2013
296
296
ahsanford said:
Cory said:
Since the thread lives I've settled on my 10-18, a 24 2.8 STM pancake lens and then ? to top it off. The Sigma 35 will stay home because it's all about light travel. That would point to a 50 1.8, but I had one and just not blown over by it. Would #3 maybe be a Canon 50 1.4? I'd maybe go with the 85 1.8 that I already have, but the 50 smaller and lighter.
Thought about a mirrorless camera, but I'm a one-camera person and strive to keep it ultra-simple.
On a side note - we altered our trip to 3 days in Cinque Terre, 3 in Florence and 2 in Milan.
Thanks.
In general with a vaca loadout -- different than a dedicated photography trip with a bag full of glass -- this is my approach:

1) I always always always bring an ultra-wide option as there is always a vista / atrium / church interior that you simply can't back your feet up any more and use the wide end of a standard zoom.

2) I think you need a standard FL zoom or standard prime (24-70, 50 prime, etc.) for faces, even if you are traveling alone.

3) And then you take a deep breath and think about what you are going to shoot or personally prefer to shoot. It has been my experience that the 'third thing' you bring of any size -- so you can disregard a pancake -- is the inflection point between a small vaca kit and a larger bag you'll need to lug around. For some, that third thing is a short tele zoom like a 70-200 / 70-300, for others it's a macro lens, for others it's a tripod and ball head, for others it's a speedlite, for others it's a 2nd body / Go-Pro / video rig, etc. Choose that third item carefully.

- A
"vaca loadout"

Gosh I love that...

My solution to 'vaca loadout' (time with wife and children on vacation where the my main goal is lots of pics of people and places without being obvious about it) is ever-changing but now includes two bodies (EOS M2 and EOS M10), three M lenses (11-22mm; 22mm; 18-55mm), a flash (270 XYZ), three spare batteries, two chargers, and a Manfrotto BeFree graphite tripod...all inside a Manfrotto backpack that was a two-fer with the tripod. Sometimes I pack a Kata DB 453 shoulder bag inside of a suitcase and use it to carry the two bodies (each with a lens attached) and a very light telescoping camcorder tripod (which is sturdy enough to nicely stabilize the M) which fits (barely) into the Kata.

When traveling this way, the 5DMkIII (and various lenses) is missed...but for everything except action photos, the M platform has served us well--and believe it or not, both daughters have the original M...and they have traveled Europe with the 22mm lens attached...and brought back spectacular pictures of (drum roll) Cinque Terre.

I very much admire the pros and near-pros who post on Canon Rumors and extol the virtues of using the best equipment...all the time.

But my goal, when traveling with family, is to use the smallest and least obtrusive gear, gear good enough to make me happy while still remaining 'on vacation'.

My vacation solution used to include the Canon S95; I have yet to persuade myself to pull the trigger on the G9X or its successor: the M2 + 22mm lens is quite small and, in my hands, has largely supplanted the S95.
 

pj1974

80D, M5, 7D, & lots of glass and accessories!
Oct 18, 2011
678
193
Adelaide, Australia
I have lived in several parts of the world, and travelled to many more. Particularly countries in Europe and Asia. I was born in, and currently live in Australia. I have visited Italy a number of times.

My current main camera is a Canon 7D, and I have a few 'backup' (older) XXXD (Rebel) series. My main lens is the Canon 15-85mm, which provides a wonderfully flexible focal length range. I have many many lenses, including the 10-18mm and 24mm STM. Both these are favourites for travel (light, and IS in the UWA).

For Italy, I think having an UWA is definitely high on the list. For a 2 lens setup with my family, I would personally take 10-18mm STM and then also the Canon 15-85mm as the all purpose, and for candids (and 'family shots'). If it was to grow into 3 lens setup, I would probably add a telezoom (I take either a 55-250mm STM or my larger, but still portable 70-300mm L). The 70-300mm L is a high quality lens, though the 55-250mm STM is no slouch either. I agree with earlier comments that travelling light and enjoying the time away (with wife and children, and/or friends) - is very important.

Regarding the 24mm STM, I love this lens. It provides a great FoV on an APS-C / crop sensor DSLR. Bbut I am not sure that I would take it on holidays, as I have that focal range covered with my 15-85mm, and in some sense it is possible you could 'cover it' with the 18mm tele end of your UWA (10-18mm STM), and go for something more tele (e.g. 85mm range).

I regularly organise photography outings (including weekend and all day outings) here in Australia for friends (and 'informal students'). For these occasions I pack a LowePro backpack full of glass and accessories, and usually take a tripod along. But when I am travelling on holiday with my family, I avoid taking a tripod if at all possible. While 'tripodless' (obviously) limits night shooting, I appreciate IS for some low light / possible shots. Or use walls, seats, other solid objects for the occasional long exposure.

Taking 2 (even identical) cameras (if you have them) can be important, so you don't need to use (or 'loose') your and your family's (!) time when you change lenses... and often 'change the lens back'. Having one camera in your hand/ round your neck, and the other in a small shoulder bag 'ready for grab and shoot' works (very) well for me.

Enjoy your holiday, Cory, and time balanced between quality time with your wife and 2 children, as well as the 'photographer' experience!

Paul 8)