An APS-C RF mount prototype is currently in the wild [CR2]

unfocused

Photos/Photo Book Reviews: www.thecuriouseye.com
Jul 20, 2010
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Another nail in the coffin for a 5DIV replacement. That hope rested on Canon continuing churning out APS-C DSLR's.
I don't think they are related.

The hope for a 5DV rests on whether or not Canon can convert 80-90% of 5D users to the R5. If they determine they aren't going to be able to do that, they will likely make a 5D or similar style DSLR in the future.

I don't pretend to know what the tipping point is, but I doubt if Canon is anxious to cede any market share to Nikon or possibly, to just simply lose those customers permanently. If Nikon releases new DSLRs, which they say they are doing, then I suspect Canon will follow suit, although I would not be surprised to see Canon put new DSLRs on hold until mid 2022 or so, to allow them to focus their resources on the R series and to better gauge market adoption of mirrorless.
 
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Lucas Tingley

Canon EOS RP
Nov 27, 2020
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I don't think they are related.

The hope for a 5DV rests on whether or not Canon can convert 80-90% of 5D users to the R5. If they determine they aren't going to be able to do that, they will likely make a 5D or similar style DSLR in the future.

I don't pretend to know what the tipping point is, but I doubt if Canon is anxious to cede any market share to Nikon or possibly, to just simply lose those customers permanently. If Nikon releases new DSLRs, which they say they are doing, then I suspect Canon will follow suit, although I would not be surprised to see Canon put new DSLRs on hold until mid 2022 or so, to allow them to focus their resources on the R series and to better gauge market adoption of mirrorless.
i wonder what the spcs would be
 
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SteB1

EOS M6 Mark II
Feb 22, 2019
55
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It's quite clear that a lot of people without any experience of nature photography, still don't understand the demand for crop sensor higher level cameras like the 7D mkII, and are still stuck in the false argument that it is about price i.e. why get a crop sensor camera if you can get a FF camera for just a bit more. Indeed I see a lot of nature photographers with FF cameras like 5D series cameras, who crop nearly every photo they take to less than APS-C size. It really is very simple. In many places, no matter how long your lens is, you will still have to crop. It's not just with telephoto stuff either, but with in the field macro photos. I'm still surprised at how many photographers don't understand that if you crop a photo to APS-C size or smaller, then a FF camera has no advantage whatsoever. You just have big file sizes and have to do a big crop on nearly every photo you take.
 
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GadgetDave

All the cameras
CR Pro
Nov 30, 2016
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There is no way it won't have IBIS. Image sensors are still the most expensive part of the camera, and the cost difference between APS-C and Full-frame is more significant than people realize. This camera will have a good margin for Canon, but it won't be an "entry-level" product. Maybe down the road we'll see a Rebel like RF mount camera.

Agreed. People don't get that the manufacturing of the sensors is not really any different from making CPUs or Memory. The cost is really per "wafer" used to make the sensors. As an example one standard size of manufacture is a 20cm wafer. From that wafer, if you assume no defects, you can get 24 FF sensors with about 35% of the wafer "wasted," or you can get 80 APS-C sensors with about 18% waste. So just looking at that, every FF sensor will cost AT LEAST 330% more (80/24) than every APS-C sensor, and that's not accounting for anything else. Basic economics and manufacturing would say that the difference is more than that, even - You have the same difference in R&D costs to develop the sensor assuming a number of prototyping efforts, etc.
 
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Bob Howland

EOS R
CR Pro
Mar 25, 2012
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If you want a real revive of 7 series Canon... Make it APS-H!
Then EF-S lenses and similar lenses from Sigma, Tamron etc. wouldn't provide enough coverage. In the whole time Canon made EOS-1D bodies, they never made a lens specifically for that format.

Also, isn't APS-H about the same size as Super 35 video sensors, about as wide and a little taller?

Is it entirely absurd that Canon could make both an R7 and an M7 using the same basic architecture?
 
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Sep 17, 2014
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Hopefully less expensive than the R6 but still with IBIS
But one of the benefits of using APS-C is that you can use shorter lenses to achieve the same magnification. Somehow I doubt that very many people buying long, heavy and fast lenses, which are also quite expensive, are going to be using them on an APS-C body. Yes, I know, a few will. But Canon isn’t making this for a few people like that. If you look at the lens lineups Canon, Nikon, and even Sony have for APS-C, it’s pitiful when compared to their full frame lineups. I’m talking about DSLR’s, because they’ve been out for two decades now.

The APS-C sensor can also be used to get MORE magnification from the same lens (more pixels on subject). So that you can use a 100-400 lens and get 640mm equivalent focal length without having to spend a ton of money on a 50 megapixel FF camera or a 600mm lens. This is the reason the 7D line was so popular. Because you got a rugged and fast pro body for less than $2000.
 
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Bob Howland

EOS R
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Mar 25, 2012
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The APS-C sensor can also be used to get MORE magnification from the same lens (more pixels on subject). So that you can use a 100-400 lens and get 640mm equivalent focal length without having to spend a ton of money on a 50 megapixel FF camera or a 600mm lens. This is the reason the 7D line was so popular. Because you got a rugged and fast pro body for less than $2000.
Two classic combinations observed at Watkins Glen International: (1) 7D or 7D2 and 100-400, as you mentioned, and, less frequently, (2) 7D or 7D2 and with a 300 f/2.8 and TCs instead of a 1D or 1Dx with a 400 f/2.8 and TCs. I started using a Sigma 150-600 Sport lens with my 7D and it works well without having to remove the lens to add or remove TCs. This is especially important when shooting motocross at dusty tracks.

I would probably order an R7 immediately.
 
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tapanit

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Jul 17, 2012
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The APS-C sensor can also be used to get MORE magnification from the same lens (more pixels on subject). So that you can use a 100-400 lens and get 640mm equivalent focal length without having to spend a ton of money on a 50 megapixel FF camera or a 600mm lens. This is the reason the 7D line was so popular. Because you got a rugged and fast pro body for less than $2000.
Yep. If I have a long lens (400mm+) and have to choose between 5DmkIV + 1.4x TC and 7Dmk2, the latter generally wins. And now with R5, I've set one of the custom modes to force crop mode - with long lenses when you know you'll end up cropping the image even more anyway, there's no point in using the entire sensor. If Canon comes up with R7 with APS-C sensor that's otherwise as good as the R5 but cheaper, let alone if it's also faster or has higher pixel density (like the 7D2 as compared to 5D4), it'd be the perfect 2nd body for me.
 
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Chris_Seattle

5DMkIV, 7DMkII, M50
Aug 30, 2019
11
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I would rather see a 83 megapixel sensor in a full sized RF body. Basically keep the same pixel density/tech as the new 32mp sensor but make it full frame. The trick is to have the expanded sensor wiring to have 2 parts. One for the internal 32mp internal “core”, then the rest of the border around it to fill out rest of full frame.

In “crop” mode you only read from the center of the sensor, and get 16fps or so. That is your 7DMARKII replacement. When you go to full mode you may only have 5FPS or so but now you have your 5DS replacement.

accepts all RF glass, EF with adapter, and you have a wildlife and landscape camera in one. :)
 
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Psamathe

I'm New Here
Sep 2, 2020
16
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I think at this point it is unlikely to have anything less than the 32MP one which is one of the most advanced APS-C sensors on the planet right now. With Canon's newest DPAF it has great potential to finally be the birders' dream camera that many have been waiting for.
It was the (for me)low pixel count that put me off the R6 so I'm also hoping an APS-C model would have 30+MP. (for cropping flexibility).

Ian
 
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Czardoom

EOS RP
Jan 27, 2020
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But one of the benefits of using APS-C is that you can use shorter lenses to achieve the same magnification. Somehow I doubt that very many people buying long, heavy and fast lenses, which are also quite expensive, are going to be using them on an APS-C body. Yes, I know, a few will. But Canon isn’t making this for a few people like that. If you look at the lens lineups Canon, Nikon, and even Sony have for APS-C, it’s pitiful when compared to their full frame lineups. I’m talking about DSLR’s, because they’ve been out for two decades now.
I think many folks are looking forward to APS-C RF cameras, so they can use FF telephoto lenses for the extra reach. I know I am, plus having a camera with wider DOF, which I usually need for taking flower pics. I have no interest in "crop" lenses. If they come out with an APS-C RF camera, I will be getting a used EF 70-300mm to put on it. Hopefully, they will have both the more expensive model for 7D users, and some cheaper models, too.
 
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