Black Rapid vs Peak Design vs CarrySpeed vs SpiderHolster

pwp

EOS R6
Oct 25, 2010
2,530
23
I started this thread almost two years ago. Funny how they pop up again from time to time.

FWIW I did go with Peak Design and have three Leash straps and a Slide. Couldn't be happier with the straps. They've truly passed the 18 month tough test, as well as being comfortable and entirely practical. I frequently work long days with two bodies, one slung on each side. PD is the first of far too many systems I've bought that pass the toughest test of all...that is that my body doesn't hurt at the end of the day. This is huge.
https://peakdesign.com/store/leash
https://peakdesign.com/store/slide

Not so hot from Peak Design for my purposes is the Capture Pro Camera Clip system. I bought two clips plus the ProPads but find the rigid design uncomfortable and impractical when used with 1-Series bodies +70-200 f/2.8isII and gripped 5D3 with 24-70 f/2.8II. They were hooked up on a premium, wide utility belt. It was awkward to move around, awkward to detach the camera/lens from the clip and vaguely uncertain at re-mount time. For a belt mount system for full size/weight cameras, the SpiderPro system works way better. With two bodies and weighty lenses I could RUN with the SpiderPro and feel 100% confident quickly mounting & dismounting. The PD Clip system is probably a great solution for very light weight point & shoots and GoPros.
https://peakdesign.com/store/capturepro
https://peakdesign.com/store/propad
http://www.spiderholster.com/

The PD straps are so good my once loved SpiderPro system is sitting unused and the PD clip system is headed for the landfill. Off brand comfy Op-Tech neck straps, Black Rapid slings and in hindsight bizarre Carry Speed systems have all been expensively passed over and given away or dumped.

Peak Design? You've probably figured I'm a fan.

-pw
 

FTb-n

Canonet QL17 GIII
Sep 22, 2012
533
8
St. Paul, MN
pwp said:
I started this thread almost two years ago. Funny how they pop up again from time to time.

FWIW I did go with Peak Design and have three Leash straps and a Slide. Couldn't be happier with the straps. They've truly passed the 18 month tough test, as well as being comfortable and entirely practical. I frequently work long days with two bodies, one slung on each side. PD is the first of far too many systems I've bought that pass the toughest test of all...that is that my body doesn't hurt at the end of the day. This is huge.
https://peakdesign.com/store/leash
https://peakdesign.com/store/slide

Not so hot from Peak Design for my purposes is the Capture Pro Camera Clip system. I bought two clips plus the ProPads but find the rigid design uncomfortable and impractical when used with 1-Series bodies +70-200 f/2.8isII and gripped 5D3 with 24-70 f/2.8II. They were hooked up on a premium, wide utility belt. It was awkward to move around, awkward to detach the camera/lens from the clip and vaguely uncertain at re-mount time. For a belt mount system for full size/weight cameras, the SpiderPro system works way better. With two bodies and weighty lenses I could RUN with the SpiderPro and feel 100% confident quickly mounting & dismounting. The PD Clip system is probably a great solution for very light weight point & shoots and GoPros.
https://peakdesign.com/store/capturepro
https://peakdesign.com/store/propad
http://www.spiderholster.com/

The PD straps are so good my once loved SpiderPro system is sitting unused and the PD clip system is headed for the landfill. Off brand comfy Op-Tech neck straps, Black Rapid slings and in hindsight bizarre Carry Speed systems have all been expensively passed over and given away or dumped.

Peak Design? You've probably figured I'm a fan.

-pw
I solved the "rigid design" issue as shown in the post below.

http://www.canonrumors.com/forum/index.php?topic=17975.msg354702#msg354702

Obviously, there's no one solution that works best for all as evidenced by the number of solutions out there and the life of this thread. But, for me, the clip works great for full-frame bodies with white lenses, including a 1Dx with the 70-200 plus a 5D3 with the 24-70.

My neck and shoulders can't handle shoulder systems, but belt systems work great for me. Granted, when I'm actively shooting or running across a field at a cross-country event, one body and lens is in my hand with the other on the belt. Still, I have no issues carrying both cameras on the belt like a pair of six-shooters (tapping my inner-John Wayne, here). Plus, the flexibility of adding bags for a third lens or a flash (with foam diffuser attached) adds to the convenience of this system.

To be fair, I never tried the Spider system. I prefer the Capture Clip in part due to the smaller camera mount and my presumption that the Capture Clip restrains some of the "swing" that might occur with the Spider. The Clip system does require two hands to remove a camera -- one to grab the camera and one to unlatch the clip. I'm used to this and don't consider it an issue. But, I can see where the Spider might be "quicker on the draw".

One other note. Also made a sling strap by sewing a 2" webbing into a loop and attaching a clip to the end. I could have added slide hardware to make the length adjustable, but for simplicity chose a fixed length near waist level. This was made for occasions when I only use a single body and lens (and thought the belt would look goofy for the occasion). It is quite handy and nice to be able to quickly disconnect the strap. But, I still gravitate toward the belt.
 

Dantana

EOS RP
Jan 29, 2013
322
169
Los Angeles, CA
www.flickr.com
The PD Clip looks like a great way to attach your rig to a backpack strap, which is very interesting to me.

But to clarify something, you have to use the plate that comes with the clip, right? I have a Kirk plate made for my 6D, and I like the fact that it fits the camera perfectly and doesn't ever twist. I'd have to ditch that plate for the PD plate, correct?
 

FTb-n

Canonet QL17 GIII
Sep 22, 2012
533
8
St. Paul, MN
Dantana said:
The PD Clip looks like a great way to attach your rig to a backpack strap, which is very interesting to me.

But to clarify something, you have to use the plate that comes with the clip, right? I have a Kirk plate made for my 6D, and I like the fact that it fits the camera perfectly and doesn't ever twist. I'd have to ditch that plate for the PD plate, correct?
Yes, you need the PD plate for the PD clip. Peak Design does offer a few different plates to work different quick release systems, including Arca. But, they don't offer plates as elaborate as the Kirk L-plates.
 

Dantana

EOS RP
Jan 29, 2013
322
169
Los Angeles, CA
www.flickr.com
FTb-n said:
Dantana said:
The PD Clip looks like a great way to attach your rig to a backpack strap, which is very interesting to me.

But to clarify something, you have to use the plate that comes with the clip, right? I have a Kirk plate made for my 6D, and I like the fact that it fits the camera perfectly and doesn't ever twist. I'd have to ditch that plate for the PD plate, correct?
Yes, you need the PD plate for the PD clip. Peak Design does offer a few different plates to work different quick release systems, including Arca. But, they don't offer plates as elaborate as the Kirk L-plates.

Thanks, that's what I thought. I'm not using an L plate, just a 6D specific Kirk plate. I guess I have to decide whether I like that system enough to change plates. Nice that they have Arca compatible gear though.
 

MiamiC70

EOS M50
Apr 9, 2015
42
0
Roger Jones said:
Halfrack said:
For what it is worth, scuttlebutt is that Carryspeed was sued by BlackRapid, and the lawsuit was dragged out enough that Carryspeed gave up. Not sure how they viewed the product as a knock off.

Black Rapid has a patent on the sliding camera strap.
http://1.usa.gov/1i9HldD

CarrySpeed LumaLoop and others have left the field or discontinued products as result of the patent grant. Carryspeed was sued by BR and seems to have gone out of business.

Millionway International, Inc. ("Millionway") and Black Rapid are competitors in the camera strap market. ( Millionway Int'l, Inc. v. Black Rapid, Inc., 4:13-CV-01780, Dkt. 1). XP Photo sells Millionway's products. Dkt. 1 ¶ 17 (Original Complaint). On November 1, 2011, the United States Patent and Trademark Office ("Patent Office") granted Black Rapid a utility patent on a camera transport system and method, known as the 729 Patent. Dkt. 1 ¶ 10. The Patent Office issued a reexamination certificate confirming the validity of the 729 Patent on March 5, 2013. Id. On March 6, 2013, Black Rapid filed suit against Millionway in the United States District Court for the Central District of California ("California Court") for infringement of the 729 Patent. Id. ¶ 12. Millionway did not answer, and Black Rapid filed a motion for default judgment on April 5, 2013. Dkt. 7, Ex. F.[1] The California Court entered default judgment against Millionway on June 10, 2013, and additionally permanently enjoined Millionway and its agents from infringing the 729 Patent. Dkt. 7, Ex. B (granting Black Rapid's motion for default judgment). Therefore, the California Court deemed Black Rapid's factual allegations in its original complaint as true, including a determination that Millionway's camera straps including the "Carry Speed" line of products, infringed the 729 Patent. Id.
http://tx.findacase.com/research/wfrmDocViewer.aspx/xq/fac.20131202_0001521.STX.htm/qx

Sorry to rehash this old thread. But how was BR granted a patent on what is basically a single point rifle sling? Also, there ar numerous versions that slide and convert from single point to dual point rifle sling using same principal as BR
 

drmikeinpdx

Celebrating 20 years of model photography!
I have a Capture Pro Clip, a leash, a pro pad and some extra anchor links. I've been doing a lot of experimenting. Since I have more than one camera body and lots of lenses, it's a complex picture.

I find that my comfort varies a lot depending on what lens and body I'm using. Obviously, the leash is a fairly narrow strap, but it's soft. Lighter camera/body combos work very well, like Rebel class bodies with kit lenses or pancakes. Large bodies are not fun with the leash.

The belt clip is a different story. Oddly, sometimes bigger lens/body combos are more comfortable than small ones. It's not just weight. It depends on the dimensions and how the leverage makes the camera pull on your belt and how the lens presses into your leg. A wide, reinforced gun/holster belt is helpful. I haven't really tried the Pro Pad much yet.

My favorite serious setup for my 5D3 is to put the belt clip on the left side of a LowePro Street and Field utility belt. (No need for the Pro Pad.) On the right side, I put a Lowepro S&F Lens Exchange Case 200 AW. I can switch between the 24-70 and the 70-200 pretty quickly and the comfort is quite good with the utility belt. I wore it for 8 hours at a music festival and it felt fine. I used the leash as well for extra safety, but probably didn't need it.

Just as when carrying a sidearm, there is no single route to comfort and accessibility!
 

jthomson

EOS RP
Aug 4, 2012
256
1
Burlington, Ontario
MiamiC70 said:
Sorry to rehash this old thread. But how was BR granted a patent on what is basically a single point rifle sling? Also, there ar numerous versions that slide and convert from single point to dual point rifle sling using same principal as BR

They get a patent by convincing the patent office that they meet the requirements for getting one. The invention doesn't even have to work. Applying the single point rifle sling to a camera may qualify as an invention, but I agree with you that it appears to be an obvious application. Nevertheless BR has a patent, it may or may not be enforceable. This can only be determined at the point when they try to enforce their patent rights in court. They won the case because CarrySpeed did not show up to defend against the claim of infringement. Defending against a claim of infringement can be very expensive.

I believe there is a point in the patent process when interested parties may contest the validity of the patent claims. At this point it would be relatively inexpensive to prevent the patent from being issued. If no one contests the claims and the patent office is convinced then the patent gets granted. It is then very expensive to defend against infringement, particularly by claiming that the patent is not valid because the invention is obvious.

Patents are designed to keep lawyers and patent agents busy.