Canon Announces That The Powerful Professional Full-Frame EOS R3 Mirrorless Camera Is On Its Way

EOS 4 Life

EOS R
Sep 20, 2020
858
694
I doubt if camera size has anything to do with IBIS. Note: iPhone has it!
It is the ratio of sensor size to camera body size.
The iPhone camera is tiny compared to the overall size of the iPhone.
Canon's older IBIS technology would not fit in M or PowerShot cameras.
This says nothing of other IBIS technologies which Canon would not be able to use because of patent restrictions.
 
  • Like
Reactions: sanj

EOS 4 Life

EOS R
Sep 20, 2020
858
694
Because we use high shutter speeds to freeze motion so it isn't needed .
Image stabilisation is only useful for counteracting camera shake for static subjects at slow shutter speeds.
It's fragile because it has many moving parts
Those are excellent points but Canon's shake mitigation is faster than most fast-moving subjects.
It is a fair question to ask whether the reduced durability is worth it for 1 stop or less or shake compensation which is about all we would get at those shutter speeds.
That being said, pro lenses tend to cost more than the camera and those have OIS.
The same claims can be made against those lenses and pros buy those without complaint.
 

EOS 4 Life

EOS R
Sep 20, 2020
858
694
I saw the Canon marketing video for the new 100mm macro. The photographer was taking handheld photos and video of insects and snakes. The images and videos were very sharp and stable, no doubt partially due to having IBIS.
As true as that is. I think Nemorino was talking about action sports and distant wildlife.
R5 and R6 are fast enough for insects and snakes.
 

chasingrealness

RF = Requires Funding
Feb 24, 2020
105
135
Queens, NY
www.chasingrealness.com
Your comment about hiking with a 1Dx is spot on and may very well temper some user's judgement about whether an R3 with integrated battery grip will work for them. I still want one, but would not be using an R3 when hiking. Heck, I wouldn't even use an R5/R6 sans grip because the bigger the cam the less mobile you are and the bigger size bodies are very difficult to protect while hiking and easily sustain damage. That is why, while not as capable, I still opt for an M50 size camera when on the trail, protected by a small Peak Design rain jacket. If it gets ruined, at least I'm only out $5-600.00 + the cost of whatever lens I might be using. In all my yrs of hiking and trail maintenance, I know of not one photographer packing a 1Dx size camera or a body with grip attached, DSLR or Mirrorless. Too big, too heavy and too expensive for trail work. I agree that I would have preferred the R3 to have optional rather than integrated grip capability but maybe Canon's reasoning here is to include necessary 4 and 8k cooling capabilities, something a larger body could accommodate. I'm anxious to see the R3 specs and pricing before making a final decision.
Canon M50 mark ii with an speed booster and the R3 might be the perfect duo. I have an RP and love it for what it is. Wish they had an RP sized camera with trail-worthy weather sealing, though.
 

Czardoom

EOS RP
Jan 27, 2020
246
558
For Pro sports and wildlife ibis has little value and is relatively fragile so I doubt it will be in R1,R3 or R7 .
Personally I'm not interested in it as a feature for my hobby of bird photography and the IS in my EF100-400 ii works fine for when I do want stabilization
That's funny, whenever I have the need to shoot some wildlife, IBIS may be the most important factor in getting a sharp shot.
 

bernie_king

EOS M6 Mark II
Jun 30, 2014
78
102
really?
turn the IS off all your super telephotos and tell me how that works for you.
with IBIS + IS you get a more stabilized view, allowing you to focus on your target with minimal movement. That assists with your AF tracking and also your metering, not to mention your composition. I'm also sure that Canon is quite aware of the IBIS durability if there is even an issue there. Not to mention you have IS units in the lenses too.

also if an R7 (or even an R3/R1) is ONLY used with long telephotos, then canon isn't going to sell as many as they could. So it's unwise to suggest that Canon is going to make three expensive camera bodies for one specific use case. Alot of pros still use 24-70's and even wider on the field, NBA games typically you see a lot of 70-200's, etc. you see it every Olympics, every Superbowl, etc (24-70's and even 16-35mm). it's not all about the long telelphotos.

for an R7? Canon is going to *try* to still get other people to buy it. Let's face it. 7D hasn't been a hot seller, just anecdotally, because if was; Nikon and Canon would have spent much more time in this market.
Canon created two "pro" 7D cameras (over 5 years and nothing since 2014), Nikon created 3, but went from 2007 for the D300 to 2016 with the D500. That's it for over what? 11 or so years of DSLR development? How many "pro" aps-c mirrorless is out there from the big three? 0.
Problem is with the super-teles the IBIS and the IS start fighting each other when you are dealing with fast moving objects. The stabilization is just too strong. It's fine if you're shooting a perched bird or something relatively stationary but as soon as you start to swing that big lens it actually blurs the image even at super high shutter speeds. I end up shutting it off altogether. I never had that issue with my 1DX II. I don't have a problem with having IBIS in the camera. It's fantastic on my unstabilized shorter primes (85 1.4 ART, 135 f2, etc...) and relatively still objects, but I wish I could just shut it off and keep my lens stabilization on my 600. Before I realized the problem I was tracking short-eared owls and swung the camera quickly on the gimbal and the entire IS system in the lens just freaked out. The element started banging around inside the lens. I had to pull the battery.
 

canonnews

EOS R
CR Pro
Dec 27, 2017
852
1,401
Canada
www.canonnews.com
Problem is with the super-teles the IBIS and the IS start fighting each other when you are dealing with fast moving objects. The stabilization is just too strong. It's fine if you're shooting a perched bird or something relatively stationary but as soon as you start to swing that big lens it actually blurs the image even at super high shutter speeds. I end up shutting it off altogether. I never had that issue with my 1DX II. I don't have a problem with having IBIS in the camera. It's fantastic on my unstabilized shorter primes (85 1.4 ART, 135 f2, etc...) and relatively still objects, but I wish I could just shut it off and keep my lens stabilization on my 600. Before I realized the problem I was tracking short-eared owls and swung the camera quickly on the gimbal and the entire IS system in the lens just freaked out. The element started banging around inside the lens. I had to pull the battery.
There's an assumption there that the R6 or R5 to the IBIS unit in an R3,etc wouldn't be improved though.
Canon's pretty aware that panning actions would need to be handled by the IBIS + IS unit.

I do assume you are talking about an R5/R6 with a L telephoto?
 

bernie_king

EOS M6 Mark II
Jun 30, 2014
78
102
There's an assumption there that the R6 or R5 to the IBIS unit in an R3,etc wouldn't be improved though.
Canon's pretty aware that panning actions would need to be handled by the IBIS + IS unit.

I do assume you are talking about an R5/R6 with a L telephoto?
Yes. Either of them with the 600 f4 II
 
  • Like
Reactions: pj1974

Fletchahh

7D Mark II
CR Pro
Aug 31, 2020
23
35
Pasadena, CA
Problem is with the super-teles the IBIS and the IS start fighting each other when you are dealing with fast moving objects. The stabilization is just too strong. It's fine if you're shooting a perched bird or something relatively stationary but as soon as you start to swing that big lens it actually blurs the image even at super high shutter speeds. I end up shutting it off altogether. I never had that issue with my 1DX II. I don't have a problem with having IBIS in the camera. It's fantastic on my unstabilized shorter primes (85 1.4 ART, 135 f2, etc...) and relatively still objects, but I wish I could just shut it off and keep my lens stabilization on my 600. Before I realized the problem I was tracking short-eared owls and swung the camera quickly on the gimbal and the entire IS system in the lens just freaked out. The element started banging around inside the lens. I had to pull the battery.
I’m curious, which IS mode was the lens in when this happened?
 

reef58

EOS RP
CR Pro
Apr 16, 2016
404
383
North Carolina
youtu.be
I think the reasoning doesn't work out, but it probably goes like this:

IBIS is more effective at wider focal lengths. Therefore it improves pictures taken with longer focal lengths to a lesser degree. And this is true. But jumping from that to wildlife and sports photography not benefitting from it or the respective photographers not caring isn't, in my opinion. I personally am most interested in IBIS especially in those circumstances, where every bit of stabilization is appreciated.

And fragile is also the wrong expression. It is certainly more likely to fail than no IBIS at all, just because it is complex moving electronics. "The best part is no part" after all. But that's a relative statement, and stating that it is fragile is absolut. Who cares if IBIS fails in average about every 500.000 shots, for example? Shutters fail much more frequently. We don't know the meantime between failures for Canon's IBIS implementation yet, I think. Until we do, it is best assumed that if failure was common, Canon will not put it in a 1 series equivalent body.
It probably has more to do with generally working on a tripod. I rarely use IS on my 500, 100 to 400 or 24-105. I don't have an issue with IBIS, but when shooting wildlife it probably will not get used much unless something jumps up unexpected and I grab the camera for a quick shot.

The other factor is if you are shooting wildlife then the lenses being used probably have IS if needed.

That being said I would be very surprised if the R1 R3 or really any R at this point doesn't have IBIS unless it is a bare bones model.
 

Fletchahh

7D Mark II
CR Pro
Aug 31, 2020
23
35
Pasadena, CA
The time it freaked out I was in Mode 1... which was my first mistake. I never really had to fuss with that with my DSLRs, but with the IBIS combo its a problem. Mode 2 seems to allow me to Pan fine as long as I stay on an even plain. Which almost never happens with birds.
Ah, that makes sense. I’ve recently switched over to mostly just using Mode 3. Framing is a little more difficult, but I haven’t had any issues with blurry photos because of the IS.

Though my setup for shooting birds is exclusively handheld with my 100-400mm II and 7D2, for what it’s worth
 
  • Like
Reactions: Chig

Chig

Birds in Flight Nutter
Jul 26, 2020
295
353
Orewa , New Zealand
The time it freaked out I was in Mode 1... which was my first mistake. I never really had to fuss with that with my DSLRs, but with the IBIS combo its a problem. Mode 2 seems to allow me to Pan fine as long as I stay on an even plain. Which almost never happens with birds.
It is frustrating that Canon forces users to have IBIS in camera and IS in lenses to be only used together in R5&6 with no option to switch off IBIS but keep IS in the lens on.
Canon's lens IS has proven reliability for those times it is helpful but IBIS can be a bit problematic it seems.
A software update giving users the option to use lens IS on it's own would be helpful.
Perhaps Canon may fit IBIS to the R3 as a test run before deciding whether it's reliable enough to put in the R1
I suspect several technologies such as the Eye Controlled AF , IBIS & Flippy screen will be fitted to the R3 in a test run before the R1 specs are finalised and I think the overall design of these 2 cameras will be similar with identical bodies and perhaps the R7 will share this cool new Integrated body too ? (Personally I would love an integrated vertical grip in the R7 as I recently added a vertical grip to my 7Dii and I love the improved ergonomics and fantastic battery life)
I would think the tooling costs of each Magnesium body shell is very high so I was surprised Canon used slightly different sized bodies for the R5 & R6 given the production runs for these cameras are probably fairly small.
However they may have some clever inexpensive way of making new tooling as they seem to make a huge number of different size bodies for all their expensive Magnesium shelled bodies none of which are made in very large numbers
 
Last edited:

EOS 4 Life

EOS R
Sep 20, 2020
858
694
It is frustrating that Canon forces users to have IBIS in camera and IS in lenses to be only used together in R5&6 with no option to switch off IBIS but keep IS in the lens on.
Please raise this as an issue with Canon.
The more people who do the higher the chances of getting it fixed.
It is the last flaw that I care about in the R5.
 

john1970

EOS R5
CR Pro
Dec 27, 2015
246
287
Northeastern US
Please raise this as an issue with Canon.
The more people who do the higher the chances of getting it fixed.
It is the last flaw that I care about in the R5.
How do we go about reporting this as a "bug" to Canon? I rare circumstances I to would like to be able to keep the lens IS and turn off the IBIS.
 

EOS 4 Life

EOS R
Sep 20, 2020
858
694
How do we go about reporting this as a "bug" to Canon? I rare circumstances I to would like to be able to keep the lens IS and turn off the IBIS.
Go to the Canon Support link on canon.com.
If your camera is not registered then ask the store you bought it from to contact Canon.
 

AEWest

EOS RP
Jan 30, 2020
341
426
As true as that is. I think Nemorino was talking about action sports and distant wildlife.
R5 and R6 are fast enough for insects and snakes.
The challenge is that the cameras have to appeal to a broad audience. I don’t use ultra high shutter speeds but the camera has it for those that do.

I try to think of it for the broader market rather than my own specific needs.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Fletchahh

dilbert

EOS M6 Mark II
Aug 12, 2010
91
76
I haven't seen it being mentioned here so far but I read on a Swedish camera site that the R3 will utilize two previous unused contacts for the RF mount. This to be able to give more power to the af-motors so certain lenses can focus quicker.

And that silver end of the new RF 400 & RF 600 will take advantage of that, meaning that the new silver end point is more than just a "built in adapter".