Canon launches “PHIL”, a photo culling app for iOS

RLP

Feb 13, 2021
1
0
Excire-search is already doing that job perfect in LR as a plugin and I also use it as a standalone version on the laptop. I paid once and all the information will not distributed anywhere. For me the best combination, good results and also fast with almost 200,000 pictures in the LR catalog and on the NAS.
https://www.excire.com/en/excire-search-2/
Rene
 

jdavidse

R5
CR Pro
Sep 13, 2012
111
120
Phone only is dumb. At the very least a native iPad app, but a desktop version is the best option. I am doing a trial and on its first run, it actually did a good job. But I am not sure I want to go from camera to desktop, make a jpeg version, upload to an iOS device, cull the photos, download again to desktop, match the winning photos. I don't see the great time savings. I despise going through group photos looking for the "winners". I know some wise@$$ will say take fewer photos, but I shoot in burst with group photos because someone will blink, another does not smile in time, etc., etc., so burst is helpful when trying to satisfy clients. There is a place for software like this, just not in its current form.
This isn't for your camera files. This is for your phone pictures, on your phone. That's it.

I loaded it and it says I have 31k photos and videos. It's for this scenario.
 
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Sep 1, 2018
3
8
This isn't for your camera files. This is for your phone pictures, on your phone. That's it.

I loaded it and it says I have 31k photos and videos. It's for this scenario.


Announced a year ago as a lightroom plugin with a youtube video showing it working with lightroom

 

mb66energy

EOS 5D Mark IV
Dec 18, 2011
1,514
378
Germany
www.MichaelBockhorst.de
"good idea if you happen to shoot 20fps" - made me laugh! After viewing a video about R5 and Sony Alpha1 where they filled 1 Terabyte within some hours of testing both cameras ... I thought that Canon has some stock at from disk manufacturers ...
 

SteveC

R5
CR Pro
Sep 3, 2019
2,321
2,180
Oops! I slipped on this one. Yes, IA is for my native french ;)
("Version française" since "version" is a feminine word :))

Whoops. Just as tricky as German, apparently, you can't tell from the word by itself (or if you can, I just don't know the rules). (With Russian, at least the feminine words almost always end in -a and neuter with -o. That works, of course until you see an accusative masculine (ends in -a too) and don't realize it's in the accusative.)

Arbitrary grammatical gender is one thing I am glad the Anglo Saxons dumped.
 

Joules

doom
CR Pro
Jul 16, 2017
1,637
1,984
Hamburg, Germany
Whoops. Just as tricky as German, apparently, you can't tell from the word by itself (or if you can, I just don't know the rules). (With Russian, at least the feminine words almost always end in -a and neuter with -o. That works, of course until you see an accusative masculine (ends in -a too) and don't realize it's in the accusative.)

Arbitrary grammatical gender is one thing I am glad the Anglo Saxons dumped.
I don't known them by heart anymore, but there are guidelines you can follow to estimate a word's gender in both German and French (I'm german and I took french throughout 'middle school' and 'high school'). There are some actual rules, like certain endings guaranteeing a certain gender, but they don't cover all words. I would not call it arbitrary, but more about feelings than facts. 'version' has a soft sounding ending pronounced in french, so masculine article would just not fit.

At least French only has two genders, and not three such as german. It's the sort of thing you just develop an intuition for as you pick up the language. But there's no clean rule to pin down a words gender if it hasn't been established before. In german, for many words adapted from other languages or product names, you will have people agreeing on one article that just sounds wrong, but disagreeing which one sounds right. It certainly isn't 'der Nutella' (for the sweet stuff you put on bread), but 'die Nutella' and 'das Nutella' both sound okay to me. But apparently there are people who consider 'der Paprika' (the pepper) to be okay, which boggles my mind - it clearly is 'die Paprika' :LOL:

Not disagreeing with you though. My english being a lot better than my french has a lot to do with the effort it takes to learn and maintain the language skill :D
 

RGF

How you relate to the issue, is the issue.
Jul 13, 2012
2,820
38
Love to see this as LR plugin. Give star ratings or simply set flags (Keep, uncertain, toss). Ideally the ap would learn what I like and adjusting its ratings on how I adjust the flags or stars. On an iPhone - why bother. Seems more like a joke or someone's kids science project than a real product.
 
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Kiton

Too deep in Canon to list! :o
Jun 13, 2015
127
112
I really do not understand this one.

Just buy a copy of Photo Mechanic and use it to batch IPTC add, rename and cull without relying on "ai" and introducing another wild card to potentially screw it up.
 

tmroper

EOS 90D
Sep 22, 2016
177
66
What a great way to train an IA while being paid! They already use your pictures for this if you go through their Canon.image service.
Always keep in mind that Canon is trying hard on CCTV, IP cam and all the surveillance software that goes with it (IA for facial recognition, among other creepy things).
For the foreseeable future, i'm sad to say that there is more growth expected there than in photography industry.
Not only that, as an added bonus, this software will help train people to take photos that AI likes better, so surveillance software can more easily find what it's looking for. A sharp, well-lit image of Uncle Karl at the rally is a lot easier to deal with than a blurry one with bad composition!
 

OneSnark

Canon Fanboy
Aug 20, 2019
53
26
Hmmm.

Another subscription program. And one with questionable privacy issues.

Nope. . . automatic disqualification.. . . . . I dumped lightroom and quicken. . . . . programs that I was heavily invested in (Quicken since the 90's - - > Lightroom since V1.0) the moment they went to annual subscription.

I bought Capture One - - - couldn't be happier. (But I will dump that as well the moment they drop the perpetual license option)

The only subscription program I would consider is MS office. . . and actually. . . my company pays for that. Once I start paying. . .I might go for google docs.
 

SteveC

R5
CR Pro
Sep 3, 2019
2,321
2,180
I don't known them by heart anymore, but there are guidelines you can follow to estimate a word's gender in both German and French (I'm german and I took french throughout 'middle school' and 'high school'). There are some actual rules, like certain endings guaranteeing a certain gender, but they don't cover all words. I would not call it arbitrary, but more about feelings than facts. 'version' has a soft sounding ending pronounced in french, so masculine article would just not fit.
I took some German in high school [which is how I knew to explain the sound in "plough/plow" unambiguously as << plau >> when we had that conversation] and they pretty much told us you had to memorize the word with the article because there was no other way to tell. So this is surprising to me. Or perhaps there is a sort of intuitive pattern which of course complete "newbies" won't get.

Although gender is pretty "clean" in Russian, stress seems very arbitrary (and it affects how the vowels are pronounced, so it's very important) but eventually you get a sense for where it probably is. (If you know where the stress goes and see the word in writing you can almost always get it right, so Russian is almost phonetically spelled.) Some linguist could probably spend five years writing out a rule that's five pages long, but that's not going to fly in Russian 101. (From what you say I'm suspecting a similar thing could happen with German.) Instead they resort to putting an acute accent over the stressed syllable for learners' texts. And there's one vowel that always gets the stress...however it has a dieresis over it that they usually don't bother with, so you can't distinguish it from another much more common vowel. Again, that's supplied in textbooks, but not in the newspaper.

Every language has its strangenesses, except maybe for Esperanto and Interlingua.
 
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Joules

doom
CR Pro
Jul 16, 2017
1,637
1,984
Hamburg, Germany
Every language has its strangenesses
Natural languages that is. You can tell that they are not the product of a well thought through design process, resulting in situations where more context than the written word is critical for communication to succeed - and even so, misunderstandings can occur.

One that I find funny was shown to me a while back: A sign with a message that only kind of works in english, I believe:
stilbluete_mehrdeutigkeit.jpg

'This area is under surveillance for prevention of crimes by the police' - leaving it to the reader to interpret whether the police are doing the surveillance or the crimes :LOL:

Stuff like this is the reason why natural language processing is such a struggle for computers, while they understand perfectly well what to do when instructed through programming languages.

All the more impressive to have such diverse and mostly effective means of human to human communication available.
 

SteveC

R5
CR Pro
Sep 3, 2019
2,321
2,180
stilbluete_mehrdeutigkeit.jpg

'This area is under surveillance for prevention of crimes by the police' - leaving it to the reader to interpret whether the police are doing the surveillance or the crimes :LOL:

Oh, yes, I get that one!

Over in my other hobby someone mentioned an "ancient coin dealer" during a club meeting, and I had to ask whether it was the dealer or the coins that were ancient. He said, "both." [Ancient coins are generally those from before AD 500, and it's actually surprising to most people how common some of them, especially Roman coins, are.]
 
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