Canon will introduce new tilt-shift lenses with a high-megapixel camera [CR2]

privatebydesign

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"You invest in these lenses when you work with a tripod,"
My 17mm TSE + EOS 5DSR have been fine handheld outdoors, and even down to 1/25 indoors - few private spaces, like churches or government buildings, let you set up a tripod without going through cumbersome permission applications. I've lost some shots because the infinity setting of the 17mm is not at the end of the dial and gets knocked out of place easily, so autofocus might overcome this (a focus lock would have been even better).
Being able to turn focus past infinity is crucial for tilt control. Indeed the ability to go much further than currently would be very useful and appreciated.

Here is a full explanation by the man himself, Harold Merklinger. https://luminous-landscape.com/canon-tilt-shift-lens-ts-e-243-5l-version-ii-review/
 

Aaron D

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Jul 21, 2016
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OK speaking only from my own perspective as an architectural photographer, I don't need or want auto focus or the added expense and complexity it brings. And speed--but that's another issue.

The very last thing I want is the lens trying to decide what needs to be sharp. After I've leveled everything, shifted, and composed--changed my mind and done it all that again, THEN I focus. Once. And the new to R focusing aid, plus the new to R5 16x zoom IN FINDER are wonderful additions!

If Canon wants to do somthing truly useful they will add a tripod foot to keep the lens stationary while the camera shifts.
 

landscaper

I'm New Here
Feb 3, 2020
9
7
Sorry CANON I couldn't wait the seven years between high resolution body updates (2015 - 2022)

My EF Tilt Shift Lenses - TSE 24mm and TSE 50 Macro are Working Brilliantly on my New Fuji GFX 100s with the TechArt Adapter.

Telephoto is abit of a Challenge in the GFX World though - both in expense and weight.
Depth of Field is substantially shallower - Great for portraits But not ideal for Landscape Hyperfocal distance shots

Sorry I couldn't have held out for what will probably be a remarkable camera, but Seven Years is allittle too long to wait for an Upgrade to my Canon 50dsr that I sold in 2019 in anticipation of the rumoured
RS high resolution model

I'm sure Sony and Fuji are already in development of the next 150 and 200 Megapixel Sensors with smaller pixel pitch and greater dynamic range

I may still buy a Canon RS or R5S or whatever they call the new hi rez body
to pair with the RF 100-500 for my telephoto needs in Landscape and Nature photography
 

privatebydesign

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Sorry CANON I couldn't wait the seven years between high resolution body updates (2015 - 2022)

My EF Tilt Shift Lenses - TSE 24mm and TSE 50 Macro are Working Brilliantly on my New Fuji GFX 100s with the TechArt Adapter.

Telephoto is abit of a Challenge in the GFX World though - both in expense and weight.
Depth of Field is substantially shallower - Great for portraits But not ideal for Landscape Hyperfocal distance shots

Sorry I couldn't have held out for what will probably be a remarkable camera, but Seven Years is allittle too long to wait for an Upgrade to my Canon 50dsr that I sold in 2019 in anticipation of the rumoured
RS high resolution model

I'm sure Sony and Fuji are already in development of the next 150 and 200 Megapixel Sensors with smaller pixel pitch and greater dynamic range

I may still buy a Canon RS or R5S or whatever they call the new hi rez body
to pair with the RF 100-500 for my telephoto needs in Landscape and Nature photography
Out of interest, what are you getting out of 100mp that you couldn't get out of 50? On an actual practical day to day usage?

There is approximately 2/3 stop difference in dof between a GFX sensor and a FF sensor.
 

landscaper

I'm New Here
Feb 3, 2020
9
7
Out of interest, what are you getting out of 100mp that you couldn't get out of 50? On an actual practical day to day usage?

There is approximately 2/3 stop difference in dof between a GFX sensor and a FF sensor.

Don't have time right now to do the precise Math but :

Allows me to Print my 60" x 90" Fine Art Prints at 300 dpi / ppi

On the CANON PROGRAF PRO-6000
PRINTER

Clients and myself like prints that you can really step close into and appreciate fine detail

Also Hallway Prints force people to view my images close up

PIXEL SHIFTED images @ 400 Megapixel
Allow for even more Post cropping and post processing options
 

privatebydesign

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Jan 29, 2011
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Don't have time right now to do the precise Math but :

Allows me to Print my 60" x 90" Fine Art Prints at 300 dpi / ppi

On the CANON PROGRAF PRO-6000
PRINTER

Clients and myself like prints that you can really step close into and appreciate fine detail

Also Hallway Prints force people to view my images close up

PIXEL SHIFTED images @ 400 Megapixel
Allow for even more Post cropping and post processing options
How often are you selling 60" x 90" prints? Maths wise you are way off, at 300dpi you get a native 39” x 29” by the way.

But that isn't really the point, the point is Canon are in the mass market, you are very much in a niche market that is filled by a niche market company, even if Canon had a camera to make you happy about MP it still wouldn't have been medium format. All is well in the world.
 
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Jack Douglas

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I suggest you do some research on what determines the resolution of optical systems (edit: start with PBD's post above!). With modern cameras and lenses, there is no such thing as 'empty resolution', increased sensor resolution always results in increased system resolution, even of the increase is not linear. Then you threw in, 'they have a wider FoV' like that was an explanation.

The same is not true for some of the optical systems I work with; for example, on a microscope with a standard Zeiss upright research scope optical train, a 100x NA=1.4 oil-immersion microscope objective, even when paired with a NA=1.4 oil-top condenser, can be fully resolved by a sVGA-resolution image sensor when imaging samples with visible light wavelengths. Anything above 800x600 is truly empty resolution. Incidentally, in the case of microscope objectives FoV does matter – while a 100x objective only needs 0.5 MP to fully resolve it, a 1.25x objective needs ~2.5MP to fully resolve the image (which is why the Zeiss microscope cameras costing far more than a Canon 1-series use low-MP 1/3" CCD sensors).
Neuro you never fail to amaze me... in various ways. ;)

Jack
 

dolina

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Dec 27, 2011
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I would be very surprised if any tilt shift will get updated before any other L lens.

The L lens I've seen updated thus far are based on which SKU sold the most units or has the most profit margins.

Would also be surprised if we will see a higher MP full frame body coming out in 2021.
 

JohnC

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AFAIK, the TS-E 17mm requires a 150mm square filter. I would be surprised if a 14mm tilt-shift could do with smaller front filters. IIRC, the TS-E lenses have plenty of space next to the mount for drop in filters, so I hope for a drop in filter.
Yes the 150 will work but it is an imperfect solution for sure. Drop in is the way to go but we will see (unless they change front element design which they may)
 

neuroanatomist

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AFAIK, the TS-E 17mm requires a 150mm square filter. I would be surprised if a 14mm tilt-shift could do with smaller front filters. IIRC, the TS-E lenses have plenty of space next to the mount for drop in filters, so I hope for a drop in filter.
Round works, I use the Wonderpana 145 mm ‘salad plates’ with my TS-E 17.

There’s not ‘plenty of space on the current versions. There’s room for a TC to go in the rear mount, sure, but I’m not sure there’s enough room for a filter. Also, the part of the barrel next to the mount is where the shift knob is (with the shift lock knob opposite). Only when the current lenses are put on an R body is there room for a drop in, in the mount adapter.
 
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Mr Majestyk

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I have a 24 mm TS-E II and chose it because it was a more flexible focal length and could easily take filter. The bulbous 17mm and a more complex filter set up pushed me infavour of the 24mm. Can I ask the owners of a 17mm whether a 14mm is attractive and where would it be used to best advantage. Is it interiors or would it also be desirable for architecture?
IMO you barely even need tilt for a 14mm, DoF is already excellent and at most you'd need 1-2 degrees. Shift is very useful however at any FL. A 24mm fully shifted gives a HFOV aprroximately equal to a 14.5mm FL anyway. I would rather a 14 f/1.8 that I can also use for low light interiors and astro, that will be lighter and cheaper.
 

Del Paso

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Aug 9, 2018
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Are you in Arkansas? :)
Unfortunately not, but in France, region Alsace (white wines, foie gras, patisserie etc...)
But after covid, Arkansas in a State I certainly would like to visit. But thanks to Canon and Leica, I'll have to delay that: I'm broke... ;)
 
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melgross

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I may be misunderstanding your comment (forgive me if that's so!), but I think the benefit of a tilt shift being paired with a higher resolution camera is not necessarily that the glass is sharp enough to use with such high resolution, but rather a tilt shift lens gives you some other options to manage loss of sharpness caused by diffraction.

Images produced by a very high resolution sensor may start losing sharpness at commonly used apertures (when images are viewed at full size). As the sensor resolution goes up, diffraction may become more visible at lower apertures when images are viewed at full size. For instance, according to a photopills calculator, a 100MP sensor may have some visual diffraction at f/5.6. Now, if you're losing sharpness from f/5.6 and upwards, it may be difficult to keep some scenes with more depth in sharp focus without going to a higher aperture or focus stacking. A tilt shift lens, however, can let you change the plane of focus to some degree to enable more of the scene to be in focus at a lower aperture.

That's based on my very limited (and likely flawed) understanding of tilt shift lenses, but to my understanding you may need a tilt shift to get all the sharpness that a very high resolution sensor can deliver.
I understand what you’re saying. But higher sharpness lenses are more highly corrected, which normally leads to a wider stop being where diffraction begins. So that really would help. And what does that have to do with a higher definition sensor? Lower rez sensors conceal diffraction,mane other lens defects better. High Rez sensors expose them more.

‘’besides, you do t need a higher rez camera to use a high Rez lens of any kind. If anything, it would be worse. I believe the introduction of them together is a coincidenc.
 

chasingrealness

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I'm happy for those who want these lenses. I just wish Canon would actually make the lenses they have already released. I'm getting a little tired of "on backorder," "more coming soon," and "released in limited quantity."
Devil’s advocate here, but personally, I am thankful to Canon for being slow to deliver these lenses. It’s saved me from having to explain to my wife why I impulse bought $6,500 in new lenses more than once.

I wish I were joking …
 

unfocused

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Devil’s advocate here, but personally, I am thankful to Canon for being slow to deliver these lenses. It’s saved me from having to explain to my wife why I impulse bought $6,500 in new lenses more than once.

I wish I were joking …
Ha. I've been there.

For several years, I was able to get by with my wife thinking I had two lenses, one black one and one white one. But, eventually, that caught up to me. Then I found a better solution.

I started buying her cameras and gradually upgrading them as her skills improved. Eventually it got to the point where she was "borrowing" my lenses and I had to but a second 100-400. Now, she never questions my purchases, but the downside is I have to buy two of everything! To add insult to injury, she's a better bird photographer than I am.
 

CanonFanBoy

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Ha. I've been there.

For several years, I was able to get by with my wife thinking I had two lenses, one black one and one white one. But, eventually, that caught up to me. Then I found a better solution.

I started buying her cameras and gradually upgrading them as her skills improved. Eventually it got to the point where she was "borrowing" my lenses and I had to but a second 100-400. Now, she never questions my purchases, but the downside is I have to buy two of everything! To add insult to injury, she's a better bird photographer than I am.
Fortunately, my wife has almost no interest in my photography hobby. Unfortunately, she has no interest in the hobby for herself either. I like to believe the fact that I got her an Olympus is the reason, but that's not true. She's perfectly happy with photos from the iPhone, and doesn't mind being sacrilegious. ;)
 

neuroanatomist

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But higher sharpness lenses are more highly corrected, which normally leads to a wider stop being where diffraction begins.
You remind me of DxOMark, who's Lens Score is based on dynamic range, color depth and light transmission. Two of those parameters have nothing to do with the lens.

Lens corrections for various aberrations have no effect on diffraction, since that is determined solely by the diameter of the iris diaphragm (and the effect of that diffraction on the final image is determined by the sensor's ability to resolve the diffraction of the image, which is inversely proportional to pixel density).

I suggest you stop commenting on optics, it's clear there are major gaps in your comprehension of the relevant principles.
 

neuroanatomist

I post too Much on Here!!
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Unfortunately not, but in France, region Alsace (white wines, foie gras, patisserie etc...)
I quite enjoyed Colmar!

Colmar.jpg
 
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chasingrealness

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Ha. I've been there.

For several years, I was able to get by with my wife thinking I had two lenses, one black one and one white one. But, eventually, that caught up to me. Then I found a better solution.

I started buying her cameras and gradually upgrading them as her skills improved. Eventually it got to the point where she was "borrowing" my lenses and I had to but a second 100-400. Now, she never questions my purchases, but the downside is I have to buy two of everything! To add insult to injury, she's a better bird photographer than I am.
oh the tangled web we weave…
 
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