Here’s confirmation of the RF 100-400, RF 24 Macro and RF 18-45. Sadly, they’re quite delayed

stevelee

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It does help if you have experience with languages that have nasty (to English speakers) consonant clusters. Russian is mildly nasty that way, Georgian far more so (and I have no real experience with Georgian).
And Italians have trouble with consonant clusters at all. Even really well educated Italians who speak excellent English will insert extra vowels to avoid colliding consonants. I don't notice that with my next-door neighbor Giorgio, however. Maybe I'm just used to talking with him. Words where English and/or French have "pl" and "fl" combinations, Italian will have "pi" and "fi" to avoid putting those sounds together.

Last year when churches were having their services on line, the Episcopal church in my neighborhood was assembling a video for the reading of the lesson from Acts 2 on Pentecost Sunday. They had different ones of us video ourselves reading parts of it in different languages. I was assigned to read the original Ancient Greek. I hadn't read any significant amount of it aloud in almost 50 years, so it was a challenge. It included tongue twisters with "ph", "th", and "s" sounds very close together. I told a friend it was like trying to say "ophthalmologist" five times fast.
 

Normalnorm

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Dec 25, 2012
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What does the "C" mean in RF 100-400 IS C USM ? My first thought was "crop" (it made my heart beat faster for a second), but then I saw the same moniker in RF 24-240 IS CUSM (and EF-S 18-135 IS CUSM) ?
(For the 100-400 it looks like there's a tiny space beteen C and USM, on the other two lenses it looks like CUSM without a space. But I assume it is the same, and just bad typography in presentation)
“Cheap USM”?
 
Oct 4, 2020
7
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I personally love doing small subject photography with wide lenses. In particular, it makes pets look incredibly cute. Perhaps it's because of South Park's influence on me, but their "Animals Close-Up With a Wide-Angle Lens" gag always struck me as genius. If you have a pet that won't pose but will rush the lens, a 24mm f/1.8 1:2 Macro would be PERFECT for capturing that animal in its natural element. I can usually do ok with most wide lenses that magnify up to 0.2x or so, but 0.5x would be even more flexible.
 

Antono Refa

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Mar 26, 2014
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Does the chart show the EF-S 18–200 f/3.5–5.6 IS, EF-S 55–250mm f/4–5.6 IS II, and EF-S 18–135mm f/3.5–5.6 IS STM being discontinued?

That would be quite a statement about the future of APS-C DSLR lines.
 

SteveC

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Sep 3, 2019
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And Italians have trouble with consonant clusters at all. Even really well educated Italians who speak excellent English will insert extra vowels to avoid colliding consonants. I don't notice that with my next-door neighbor Giorgio, however. Maybe I'm just used to talking with him. Words where English and/or French have "pl" and "fl" combinations, Italian will have "pi" and "fi" to avoid putting those sounds together.

Last year when churches were having their services on line, the Episcopal church in my neighborhood was assembling a video for the reading of the lesson from Acts 2 on Pentecost Sunday. They had different ones of us video ourselves reading parts of it in different languages. I was assigned to read the original Ancient Greek. I hadn't read any significant amount of it aloud in almost 50 years, so it was a challenge. It included tongue twisters with "ph", "th", and "s" sounds very close together. I told a friend it was like trying to say "ophthalmologist" five times fast.
Some Italians can adapt to clusters, some cannot. I heard advanced Russian students (I mean Americans taking Russian classes) have trouble with "ts" at the beginning of a word, and also the word kto (what?), even though both clusters exist in English--just not at the beginnings of words. I on the other hand had no problem with it, and don't have anything like Russian in my background.

I understand that the Arab word for America is "Amrika" (or perhaps a different ending); they actually created a consonant cluster there--though to be fair from what I can see the "eh" sound doesn't exist in that language.
 

stevelee

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Some Italians can adapt to clusters, some cannot. I heard advanced Russian students (I mean Americans taking Russian classes) have trouble with "ts" at the beginning of a word, and also the word kto (what?), even though both clusters exist in English--just not at the beginnings of words. I on the other hand had no problem with it, and don't have anything like Russian in my background.

I understand that the Arab word for America is "Amrika" (or perhaps a different ending); they actually created a consonant cluster there--though to be fair from what I can see the "eh" sound doesn't exist in that language.
Maybe there are regional differences of the effect in Italy. I’m reminded of the WW II era joke about the Italian-American standing watch. “Hey, Tony, is that a U-boat?” ”No, it’sa notta my boat!”

Auf Deutsch I had trouble learning to say “nichts.” I still have to slow down to get it right.

Vowels in Semitic languages don’t have much consistency within or between languages. Muhammed’s dialect lacked vowel sounds used elsewhere, (or something like that), and so an extra mark is thrown into what became standard Arabic spelling. Anyhow, ‘amrika doesn’t have a real cluster, but different syllables. I find the loss of the ‘p’ sound in Arabic interesting. You can go to Jaffa and drink a Bebsi (or at least in theory).
 

AlanF

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Wirschtchen, a little sausage in Luxembourg, has 7 consonants in a string. I am sure that others will find longer strings.
 
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koenkooi

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Feb 25, 2015
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Wirschtchen, a little sausage in Luxembourg, has 7 consonants in a string. I am sure that others will find longer strings.
Certainly! Angstschreeuw, meaning a cry out of fear in Dutch has 8. On the other end of the spectrum we have a cow’s udder, koeieuier.
 

tron

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If the 18-45 offers the same quality but smaller and cheaper than the 14-35 I'd go for it. I don't need wider than 18mm, but small and light is a priority.
I doubt it since it will be a non-L lens. But if it comes close maybe it will suit you (and many more!...)
 
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Etienne

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I doubt it since it will be a non-L lens. But if it comes close maybe it will suit you (and many more!...)
I've been quite happy with the EF-M 11-22 4.5-5.6 IS ... at a fraction of the price of my EF16-35 f/2.8L II and much smaller and lighter. Canon has been pretty good with some of the non-L glass
 
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stevelee

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I've been quite happy with the EF-M 11-22 4.5-5.6 IS ... at a fraction of the price of my EF16-35 f/2.8L II and much smaller and lighter. Canon has been pretty good with some of the non-L glass
The EF-S 10-22mm lens is quite good. I have used it for real estate photography. These days I would use my 16-35mm f/4 on my 6D2, covering almost exactly the same field of view.
 

SteveC

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Wirschtchen, a little sausage in Luxembourg, has 7 consonants in a string. I am sure that others will find longer strings.

It's spelled with 7 consonants, but it does not have seven consonant sounds. It looks like three or four. For some reason the German language decided it needed to spell the "sh" sound with three letters. And the English ch sound as in "church," ends up as "tsch" (cumbersome but logical, because that sound is an affricate of t+sh), as in "Deutsch." Russian, incidentally has one letter for both the sh and ch sounds. (Actually they have two distinct letters for sounds that are similar to sh, neither one is quite a match for the one used in English.)

I did find reference to a word in Georgian, "gvprtskvni" (nine consonants in English spelling, but "ts" is one sound represented by one letter in Georgian, so eight bona fide consonants: გვფრცქვნ) which apparently means "you peel us". We're just lucky none of those consonants are ejectives (a class of consonants English does not have at all).
 

stevelee

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It's spelled with 7 consonants, but it does not have seven consonant sounds. It looks like three or four.
'W' (like our 'v'), 'r', 'sch' (like our 'sh' as you say), 't', 'ch' (like the mid-tongue in 'ich", not the throaty one as in 'Bach', nor our 'ch' sound which they would spell 'tsch'), and 'n', so four consonant sounds together. It depends upon what kind of 't' sound they use how hard it is to get all the sounds in, if indeed they do in real life. It might be sort of like triple-tonguing when playing the clarinet.
 
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Joules

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Hmmm, not a bit of talk about Canon's longest non L or DO lens in it's history. (RF 100-400) I can't help but think this will be a sleeper like the 40 pancake or 70-300L.
Strictly speaking, the RF 800 mm f/11 lens does not have DO branding, so that is the longest one. It has DO elements in it though.