Here we go again but now it’s real. Best way to carry R5?

JPAZ

If only I knew what I was doing.....
CR Pro
Sep 8, 2012
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To cut to the chase, I really did in my back this time. So, I am looking long and hard at carrying options yet again. I’ve done pretty well with BR straps with or without a backpack that uses a good waist belt (puts the weight on my hips) so I can bring other glass. Now, I think I will need to consider a Spider or other holster to get the weight of the body and lens (for example an R5 + RF 100-200) off my shoulder, too yet still have flexibility to use my kit. I know everybody has a system they like. I do also. But carrying on my shoulders has become more of an issue. I‘ve considered moving back to the M series but do love what I can do with the R5 sensor too much to do that. I've even considered an m2/3 to lighten the load. But, I don’t want to give up my R5 unless there is no choice. So, without flame or critique, anybody have any ideas for me? I hope that hanging my MILC and lens from my waist will sufficiently relieve by lumbar spine. Anyone have any experience?

Ah, the "golden years." They are a lot different than the golden hours of light, aren't they. Thanks, everyone.

JPAZ
 
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snappy604

EOS RP
CR Pro
Jan 25, 2017
617
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wouldn't mind a bit of advice on this as well. I haven't found a good solution and do find more and more that it's painful to carry a lot of lenses / camera and do long hikes. Used to have a black rapid over shoulder but the plastic bits were cheap and broke within months.
 

neuroanatomist

I post too Much on Here!!
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Jul 21, 2010
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My normal carry method is a BlackRapid strap. I've had a different experience from @snappy604 – the only problem I've had is that my first strap started to get a frayed edge after about 2 years of use. I emailed BR, they sent me out a new strap at no charge. For years I used the BR strap with the lug attached to a Kirk 1" clamp for easy connection to the RRS plates on my camera bodies and lenses (to move the attachment point for balance or remove for tripod use). I recently switched to the BlackRapid QD strap for my main carry because the newer RRS plates all have that attachment hole, and it's robust and low profile. They don't have a left-handed version of the QD strap, so I kept my original one with the Kirk clamp, which is fine because I only use that with my 600/4L IS II (and the RRS foot on the lens is too old to have a QD socket anyway).

But none of that is relevant to @JPAZ as the shoulder is not the place...

I have and occasionally use a Spider Holster setup. I bought it when my kids were younger and needed frequent carrying, so I wanted both hands free and nothing dangling. I did not go with the full strap setup, but rather bought the SpiderPro LowePro Belt Adapter Kit to use with my LowePro Deluxe Technical Belt. Spider still has a belt adapter kit (dropped 'LowePro' from the name), LowePro discontinued the belt I have in favor of the ProTactic Utility Belt (which is a lot like their old Light Utility Belt that I also have). Rather than the regular Spider plate (they now have a DSLR and a smaller MILC plate), I use their Arca-Swiss Clamp (they now have a V2 version). Same as with the BR strap, the clamp lets me hang the camera by the body plate with a smaller lens or by the lens foot on a collared lens.

The LowePro belts (all of them) have multiple loops for their strap system. I have a bunch of LowePro lens cases of varying sizes so I can easily carry an extra lens or two, and holders for a water bottle and phone. I also have a Maglite-type holder that is perfect for carrying my RRS monopod/tilt head on the belt.
 
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Del Paso

M3 Singlestroke
CR Pro
Aug 9, 2018
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I have been using a Peak Design clip from the time they were sold, one part on the backpack's shoulder strap, the other one mounted on the camera's tripod thread . Till now, no issues at all, not even with my favorite combo, 5DIV plus EF 100-400. Very safe and quick access to the camera, and the weight is on the hips (withe the right backpack, of course).
Without backpack, I used PD's widest shoulder straps, they offer kind of a sliding feature. I just can't get used to BR straps.
Another idea would be to use an Optech harness (weight on TWO shoulders), for one or two cameras.
 
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JPAZ

If only I knew what I was doing.....
CR Pro
Sep 8, 2012
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My normal carry method is a BlackRapid strap.……..

But none of that is relevant to @JPAZ as the shoulder is not the place...

I have and occasionally use a Spider Holster setup. I bought it when my kids were younger and needed frequent carrying, so I wanted both hands free and nothing dangling. I did not go with the full strap setup, but rather bought the SpiderPro LowePro Belt Adapter Kit to use with my LowePro Deluxe Technical Belt. Spider still has a belt adapter kit (dropped 'LowePro' from the name), LowePro discontinued the belt I have in favor of the ProTactic Utility Belt (which is a lot like their old Light Utility Belt that I also have). Rather than the regular Spider plate (they now have a DSLR and a smaller MILC plate), I use their Arca-Swiss Clamp (they now have a V2 version). Same as with the BR strap, the clamp lets me hang the camera by the body plate with a smaller lens or by the lens foot on a collared lens.

The LowePro belts (all of them) have multiple loops for their strap system. I have a bunch of LowePro lens cases of varying sizes so I can easily carry an extra lens or two, and holders for a water bottle and phone. I also have a Maglite-type holder that is perfect for carrying my RRS monopod/tilt head on the belt.
over time went from the Canon strap to the PD over a shoulder to a TT holster attached to my chest. But now, I’ve been real happy with BR until this month. @Neuro……you understand that I’ve managed to do in L3-4 on the left. Hopeful we‘ll see improvement but my present set up (either LowePro or Thinktank with a good waist belt still puts too much weight on the shoulders, I am afraid. Hoping that a belt holster with the R5 and a lens on my hip then maybe some stuff low on my back with a good waist belt is an option. Seems the days of the BR and trekking poles are over. Since my only local options are to buy and try (no good local store I am afraid), I am trying to get as much info as I can before ordering something. Even thought about a wheeled carry but that just won’t do for anything off paved pathways.

thanks again to all
 
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Jack Douglas

CR for the Humour
Apr 10, 2013
6,942
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Alberta, Canada
My normal carry method is a BlackRapid strap. I've had a different experience from @snappy604 – the only problem I've had is that my first strap started to get a frayed edge after about 2 years of use. I emailed BR, they sent me out a new strap at no charge. For years I used the BR strap with the lug attached to a Kirk 1" clamp for easy connection to the RRS plates on my camera bodies and lenses (to move the attachment point for balance or remove for tripod use). I recently switched to the BlackRapid QD strap for my main carry because the newer RRS plates all have that attachment hole, and it's robust and low profile. They don't have a left-handed version of the QD strap, so I kept my original one with the Kirk clamp, which is fine because I only use that with my 600/4L IS II (and the RRS foot on the lens is too old to have a QD socket anyway).

But none of that is relevant to @JPAZ as the shoulder is not the place...

I have and occasionally use a Spider Holster setup. I bought it when my kids were younger and needed frequent carrying, so I wanted both hands free and nothing dangling. I did not go with the full strap setup, but rather bought the SpiderPro LowePro Belt Adapter Kit to use with my LowePro Deluxe Technical Belt. Spider still has a belt adapter kit (dropped 'LowePro' from the name), LowePro discontinued the belt I have in favor of the ProTactic Utility Belt (which is a lot like their old Light Utility Belt that I also have). Rather than the regular Spider plate (they now have a DSLR and a smaller MILC plate), I use their Arca-Swiss Clamp (they now have a V2 version). Same as with the BR strap, the clamp lets me hang the camera by the body plate with a smaller lens or by the lens foot on a collared lens.

The LowePro belts (all of them) have multiple loops for their strap system. I have a bunch of LowePro lens cases of varying sizes so I can easily carry an extra lens or two, and holders for a water bottle and phone. I also have a Maglite-type holder that is perfect for carrying my RRS monopod/tilt head on the belt.
Thanks for this Neuro. I have no experience with any of these items. Thinking R5, I'm considering the holster you mentioned but am wondering how that would work with some belt adapter extra items such as a lens case and does the addition of the Arca plate alter anything (I'm not too much of a tripod user but probably would add that). I usually have my Sherpa helping out but she's not getting any younger either. ;)

Also what would you suggest so as to avoid having a dangling camera strap but still having some security holding the camera. I always have the strap on my 400 DO II around my shoulder and that's my most used lens (sometimes it's on a Jobu gimbal) if I'm out in the wild but I'm thinking city tourist kind of situations regarding the holster and the R5 on the hip (and maybe an extra camera around the neck).

Jack
 

neuroanatomist

I post too Much on Here!!
CR Pro
Jul 21, 2010
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Hi Jack,

If you just want a failsafe for the camera, I'd suggest a Peak Design Cuff Wrist Strap. I have the anchors on my R3, R and M6, and the wrist strap can easily be attached to any of them. The R3 also has a Canon E1 hand strap on it to actually hold the camera, the wrist strap is just in case.
 
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Felix

Greetings from Germany
Nov 9, 2021
36
18
I have been using a Peak Design clip from the time they were sold, one part on the backpack's shoulder strap, the other one mounted on the camera's tripod thread . Till now, no issues at all, not even with my favorite combo, 5DIV plus EF 100-400. Very safe and quick access to the camera, and the weight is on the hips (withe the right backpack, of course).
Without backpack, I used PD's widest shoulder straps, they offer kind of a sliding feature. I just can't get used to BR straps.
Another idea would be to use an Optech harness (weight on TWO shoulders), for one or two cameras.
I can also highly recommend the Peak Design Capture Clip in combination with the Pro Pad. But to be on the safe side, i always wear the slide strap (without strain) around my neck or use the wrist strap instead
 

SHAMwow

EOS R5
CR Pro
Sep 7, 2020
90
136
I use a Peak Slide Lite, in the sling fashion. Regardless of brand that's what I'd recommend for weight distribution. I personally like the Peak because of how smooth and easy it is to adjust and the material. The anchors aren't really a selling point for me nor a detraction either.
 

Felix

Greetings from Germany
Nov 9, 2021
36
18
I use a Peak Slide Lite, in the sling fashion. Regardless of brand that's what I'd recommend for weight distribution. I personally like the Peak because of how smooth and easy it is to adjust and the material. The anchors aren't really a selling point for me nor a detraction either.
The anchors are just great when the camera is on the tripod and you don't want a strap :love:
 

Del Paso

M3 Singlestroke
CR Pro
Aug 9, 2018
1,625
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The anchors are just great when the camera is on the tripod and you don't want a strap :love:
Plus: depending on the lens-camera combo, I can swap straps quickly (lite, wide, harness, wrist strap etc...). Peak-design (clip on backpack-strap)(y)saved my neck from pain!
 

SHAMwow

EOS R5
CR Pro
Sep 7, 2020
90
136
Plus: depending on the lens-camera combo, I can swap straps quickly (lite, wide, harness, wrist strap etc...). Peak-design (clip on backpack-strap)(y)saved my neck from pain!
Oh for sure, I just say it that way because I know so many people on here worry their camera will disconnect and break, etc. because of the anchor system.
 

Del Paso

M3 Singlestroke
CR Pro
Aug 9, 2018
1,625
1,875
Oh for sure, I just say it that way because I know so many people on here worry their camera will disconnect and break, etc. because of the anchor system.
I've been using the anchors right from the start, never had to replace an anchor. But I've heard fears expressed about the reliability of "such thin" cords...
The cords even have a built-in security as you know, first a warning yellow, then red. Never saw these colors...
But fears are irrational, yet understandable.
 

Jack Douglas

CR for the Humour
Apr 10, 2013
6,942
2,516
Alberta, Canada
I've been using the anchors right from the start, never had to replace an anchor. But I've heard fears expressed about the reliability of "such thin" cords...
The cords even have a built-in security as you know, first a warning yellow, then red. Never saw these colors...
But fears are irrational, yet understandable.
Well, I as a newcomer to this technology am having some of these concerns but only because I don't have any knowledge or experience. It really helps to have the feedback of long-time users. I plan to make my first purchase and initially it's to allow me to not have the camera strap dangling when I'm using my big white with its strap.

I have mentioned this in the past but it doesn't seem to be a popular idea. I have my strap short and across my left shoulder only. The large Jobu dovetail foot on the 400 is facing up and I can hold it comfortably with my right hand. Half the time the camera/lens is being held steady by my hand with weight on my shoulder and the other half it is being held up with weight off my shoulder, including when I have to jump a puddle or step over a fallen tree or climb down an embankment. When I shoot, the short strap length allows me to create a triangle of tension for steadiness.

If the camera plus 400 plus extender were hanging from my neck I'd be dead and almost the same if the weight were permanently on my shoulder. I might add that the lens is not so long as to prevent the camera from tucking into the crotch of my right arm so carrying it this way is very secure. A small issue is that I have to initially get my head through the strap so the strap is only over my left shoulder. Of course, right arm strength is necessary.

Jack
 

AlanF

Stay at home
CR Pro
Aug 16, 2012
9,728
14,961
Well, I as a newcomer to this technology am having some of these concerns but only because I don't have any knowledge or experience. It really helps to have the feedback of long-time users. I plan to make my first purchase and initially it's to allow me to not have the camera strap dangling when I'm using my big white with its strap.

I have mentioned this in the past but it doesn't seem to be a popular idea. I have my strap short and across my left shoulder only. The large Jobu dovetail foot on the 400 is facing up and I can hold it comfortably with my right hand. Half the time the camera/lens is being held steady by my hand with weight on my shoulder and the other half it is being held up with weight off my shoulder, including when I have to jump a puddle or step over a fallen tree or climb down an embankment. When I shoot, the short strap length allows me to create a triangle of tension for steadiness.

If the camera plus 400 plus extender were hanging from my neck I'd be dead and almost the same if the weight were permanently on my shoulder. I might add that the lens is not so long as to prevent the camera from tucking into the crotch of my right arm so carrying it this way is very secure. A small issue is that I have to initially get my head through the strap so the strap is only over my left shoulder. Of course, right arm strength is necessary.

Jack
Jack

I used to carry my Camera + 400mm DO II using this type of BlackRapid Double Breathe strap with one strap attached to the tripod foot and the other to the camera base, and the camera and lens slung across my stomach. It was very comfortable and safe. I used a Chinese knock-off version that cost about $14 rather than the $140 for the BR.

361003-Double-Breathe-top-seller-02-copy-1-300x375.png
 

Jack Douglas

CR for the Humour
Apr 10, 2013
6,942
2,516
Alberta, Canada
Jack

I used to carry my Camera + 400mm DO II using this type of BlackRapid Double Breathe strap with one strap attached to the tripod foot and the other to the camera base, and the camera and lens slung across my stomach. It was very comfortable and safe. I used a Chinese knock-off version that cost about $14 rather than the $140 for the BR.

View attachment 202458
Thanks. That could be in my future. Right now my right arm is capable and my style of shooting works. I like having the camera /long lens tucked into my right arm pit but once my strength diminishes that won't be feasible. You're a bit senior to me but my issues are on the horizon; getting old is not my idea of fun. ;)

Jack
 

SHAMwow

EOS R5
CR Pro
Sep 7, 2020
90
136
Yeah and another thing is how you shoot. I'd never use a rapid strap attached to a lens because I shoot single body, and swap lenses a moderate amount.
 

neuroanatomist

I post too Much on Here!!
CR Pro
Jul 21, 2010
27,125
6,564
Yeah and another thing is how you shoot. I'd never use a rapid strap attached to a lens because I shoot single body, and swap lenses a moderate amount.
That's the point of having a quick release attachment like the QD connector (or the Kirk clamp I used to use). I can very easily move the attachment from the body plate to the lens plate. With a collared lens, connecting to the lens foot give better balance on the strap, IMO.
 

JPAZ

If only I knew what I was doing.....
CR Pro
Sep 8, 2012
1,154
576
Right now I use a BR with a QD to the baseplate on the R5 or with the QD attached to a Kirk plate on the RF100-500 lens when I carry that combo (Along with a safety tether). Just wondering about moving to a holster to carry on my hip and get the weight off my shoulder. Of course, will need to think about trekking poles, too.

Once, while trekking in Nepal, an older gentleman (I think I am starting to resemble that descriptor) hired a young kid to carry his kit. I hope I am not quite there, yet but my back ain’t getting any younger