Here we go again but now it’s real. Best way to carry R5?

AlanF

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Aug 16, 2012
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I use a BR with the R5 and RF 100-500 attached to both the camera base and the tripod foot. It hangs better but the main reason is for safety in case one of the connections fails. In the past, I would carry a 5DIII and 300mm f/2.8 II attached by the lens alone, and the 5DII once fell off and required a new top plate. It slows changing lenses by a few seconds.
 

TAF

EOS RP
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Feb 26, 2012
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I'm not getting any younger either...I use a wide OpTech strap with long connector pieces so my R5 can hang around my neck and be around my navel.

Which is exactly what I did 40 years ago when I was toting my Rollei TLR. On their vile thin leather straps which dug into your neck...what were they thinking?

I tried using a tripod socket attachment for the straps, but have since reverted.

I have seen a sort of arrangement for binoculars that goes over both shoulders (with a leather pad in the middle of your back connecting the straps) and which allows the binoculars to hang in the middle of your chest, ready for action. The one I have is marked Leupold, but I doubt they made it.

That might also work well for you.

As for the extra kit, I'll hang a lens bag on my belt for one spare lens. Beyond that, I haven't tried.
 

Bdbtoys

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I have a thinktankphoto belt/harness combo (they also open-holster type as well which I don't have). I also have the Cotton Carrier harness and chest sling mounts (they also have an open-holster as well, again not something I tried). I've been mostly using the Cotton sling for small lenses and the harness for larger ones. I tend to like to keep the camera high so it's not catching on things at waist level... when not just using a strap. I just haven't used the thinktank harness to do a direct comparision to the cotton... but the mechanisms are different.
 
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Jack Douglas

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Not exactly a question about a strap or harness but I think it could tie in. I only have arca-swiss on my 400 since the Jobu gimbal is what I use with that lens. I removed the extra foot section from the Jobu and moved the plate to the side since the 400 has such a beautiful rotating collar. So my tripod typically has the gimbal on it and if I were to want to put the R5 directly on it with smaller lenses, I'd need arca-swiss on the side of the camera. Is there an attachment that would do this or would I be better just putting the foot back on the gimbal? There are so many products to sift though I'm hoping someone can just guide me.

Jack
 

JPAZ

If only I knew what I was doing.....
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@Jack - I opted for a plate directly on the R5 for when I am not using a big lens.

So over the years, used a TT holster with a chest harness leaving the camera strap loosely around my neck. Then, went with PD slide across chest over one shoulder. More recently, us either a BR by itself or a BR from my backpack straps. All of these setups allowed me to use trekking poles. I have a QD - Arca plate on my R5 body and another QD - Arca plate on the RF100-500 foot for times I use that longer lens. Like everyone else, I have too many backpacks but tend to use those with a good waist belt to get the pressure off my shoulders. So far, looked at Cotton Carrier, PD clip, Spider and a variety of “jury rigged” setups on line. Looks like the Spider Holster could definitely move the weight of the camera and lens off of my shoulders and back but I wonder if I’d be able to use trekking poles with that sort of setup. I known there is no single best answer but am hoping for a solution.
 

neuroanatomist

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Jack, I presume the Jobu gimbal as a side mount lets you rotate it so the clamp is vertical (vs. horizontal for the lens foot)? If so, you simply need an L bracket for your camera.

That puts an Arca plate on the side for landscape orientation shots with a side mount gimbal (and a plate in the bottom if you want to shoot from the gimbal in portrait orientation).

Side gimbals are flexible that way, with a full gimbal you need something to rotate the clamp 90° (can be done, more complicated though).
 
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Jack Douglas

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Jack, I presume the Jobu gimbal as a side mount lets you rotate it so the clamp is vertical (vs. horizontal for the lens foot)? If so, you simply need an L bracket for your camera.

That puts an Arca plate on the side for landscape orientation shots with a side mount gimbal (and a plate in the bottom if you want to shoot from the gimbal in portrait orientation).

Side gimbals are flexible that way, with a full gimbal you need something to rotate the clamp 90° (can be done, more complicated though).
Thanks. That's kind of what I thought. So is there anything I need to know about the L bracket I would get for the R5? I pretty much have to order via Amazon.ca or maybe B&H US but that's importation and I wouldn't want to make a mistake

Jack
 

neuroanatomist

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Thanks. That's kind of what I thought. So is there anything I need to know about the L bracket I would get for the R5? I pretty much have to order via Amazon.ca or maybe B&H US but that's importation and I wouldn't want to make a mistake

Jack
I usually use Really Right Stuff plates and have always been pleased with them. Kirk also makes great gear. B&H carries both.

I’d definitely suggest a bracket designed specifically for the R5 rather than a ‘universal’ bracket.
 
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Bdbtoys

R5
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Thanks. That's kind of what I thought. So is there anything I need to know about the L bracket I would get for the R5? I pretty much have to order via Amazon.ca or maybe B&H US but that's importation and I wouldn't want to make a mistake

Jack
I'll give small rig a +1. Biggest thing is to get one that lets the screen to articulate... and that usually requires a specifically made one (like neuro mentioned).
 
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I usually use Really Right Stuff plates and have always been pleased with them. Kirk also makes great gear. B&H carries both.

I’d definitely suggest a bracket designed specifically for the R5 rather than a ‘universal’ bracket.
Promedia gear plate is great, but rather bulky,
 

neuroanatomist

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I'll give small rig a +1. Biggest thing is to get one that lets the screen to articulate... and that usually requires a specifically made one (like neuro mentioned).
While that’s true on a ballhead or for handheld use, it doesn’t really matter on a side gimbal, since the head itself will be in the way.

36A2AC71-C707-4B1B-95C3-D97E155607B1.jpeg
 

Jack Douglas

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While that’s true on a ballhead or for handheld use, it doesn’t really matter on a side gimbal, since the head itself will be in the way.

View attachment 202470
Right on. Thanks everyone, I think I'm good to go now. The whole time I owned the 1DX2 I seldom shot portrait because many/most wildlife photos seem to me to look better in landscape and I guess that's because few have their monitors in portrait mode. I never use the portrait grip mainly because it felt less than ideal and I'm used to rotating the camera, and I'm shy of people. ;)

Jack
 

Del Paso

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@Jack - I opted for a plate directly on the R5 for when I am not using a big lens.

So over the years, used a TT holster with a chest harness leaving the camera strap loosely around my neck. Then, went with PD slide across chest over one shoulder. More recently, us either a BR by itself or a BR from my backpack straps. All of these setups allowed me to use trekking poles. I have a QD - Arca plate on my R5 body and another QD - Arca plate on the RF100-500 foot for times I use that longer lens. Like everyone else, I have too many backpacks but tend to use those with a good waist belt to get the pressure off my shoulders. So far, looked at Cotton Carrier, PD clip, Spider and a variety of “jury rigged” setups on line. Looks like the Spider Holster could definitely move the weight of the camera and lens off of my shoulders and back but I wonder if I’d be able to use trekking poles with that sort of setup. I known there is no single best answer but am hoping for a solution.
Thanks for the hint (TT holster).
I hadn't heard about it before, and just ordered one today to give it a try. One more example of how valuable Canonnrumors can be!
 
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Jack Douglas

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Well, I obviously wa a little brain dead regarding the L bracket and the Jobu gimbal. The lens foot dovetail is oriented in a direction that allows balancing and without balance a gimbal is not all that beneficial. It would seem there is no solution other than some weird custom mount.

Jack
 

neuroanatomist

I post too Much on Here!!
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Jul 21, 2010
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Well, I obviously wa a little brain dead regarding the L bracket and the Jobu gimbal. The lens foot dovetail is oriented in a direction that allows balancing and without balance a gimbal is not all that beneficial. It would seem there is no solution other than some weird custom mount.
Hi Jack,

I'm confused about your problem. Previously, you stated:
I removed the extra foot section from the Jobu and moved the plate to the side since the 400 has such a beautiful rotating collar. So my tripod typically has the gimbal on it and if I were to want to put the R5 directly on it with smaller lenses, I'd need arca-swiss on the side of the camera. Is there an attachment that would do this or would I be better just putting the foot back on the gimbal?
I'm not familiar with the Jobu gimbal you have, but I assumed that meant it is one that can function either as a full gimbal where the lens foot points 'down' and sits on the cradle clamp or as a side gimbal where there is no cradle and the lens foot is on the left side of the lens (looking from behind) attaching directly to the clamp. I'll try to illustrate with my side mount gimbal (RRS PG-02).

A collared lens mounts like this (using the RF 70-200/2.8 since I was too lazy to pull out the 600/4, the gimbal is a bit overkill):
Screen Shot 2022-02-16 at 10.12.58 PM.png

By simply rotating the gimbal side clamp 90°, the upright part of the L-bracket allows the camera to be mounted:
Screen Shot 2022-02-16 at 10.13.23 PM.png

Am I missing something about what you're trying to do? You mention balance, but you should be able to lock the gimbal clamp in whatever orientation you want, e.g. with the camera level. That's what I did above. Of course, if you have no tension on the clamp pivot, then you're right about balance being an issue. This is what happens when I loosen the large knob opposite the clamp (I was gentle since I knew what would happen):
Screen Shot 2022-02-16 at 10.13.37 PM.png

There's an easy (but not free) solution to that, and the clue to it is in my head's designation – PG stands for pano-gimbal. Although I usually use it as a gimbal head, it can also be used to make panoramas. Doing that 'properly' means rotating the camera/lens around the nodal point of the lens itself (which varies from lens to lens). The solution to that is actually the same solution to balancing the side-mounted camera body on the gimbal (since the rig has to be balanced for rotation around the nodal point). That solution is called a nodal slide. I have the RRS MPR-CL II, and with that locked into the side gimbal clamp and the L-bracket attached to the clamp that is integrated into the nodal slide, with the knob loosened the rig can be slid back and forth in the clamp to the balance point (which is why it's called a nodal slide):
Screen Shot 2022-02-16 at 10.13.48 PM.png

(Technically, just balancing the rig doesn't mean you'll be rotating around the nodal point for a pano, it's more complex than that...but if your goal is a balanced rig so the gimbal acts like one, that does the trick.)

Incidentally, if you want to use the cradle clamp so you have a full gimbal, but use that with a camera body mounted, the answer is the same – a nodal slide. As you can see from the design, the rail sits fore-aft in the bottom clamp (same orientation as a lens foot), but the clamp integrated into the slide allows you to attach the camera base plate (no L-bracket needed) that is oriented 90° to the gimbal clamp.
Screen Shot 2022-02-16 at 10.40.26 PM.png

Hope some of that long post helps sort you out!
 

Jack Douglas

CR for the Humour
Apr 10, 2013
6,942
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Alberta, Canada
Hi Jack,

I'm confused about your problem. Previously, you stated:

I'm not familiar with the Jobu gimbal you have, but I assumed that meant it is one that can function either as a full gimbal where the lens foot points 'down' and sits on the cradle clamp or as a side gimbal where there is no cradle and the lens foot is on the left side of the lens (looking from behind) attaching directly to the clamp. I'll try to illustrate with my side mount gimbal (RRS PG-02).

A collared lens mounts like this (using the RF 70-200/2.8 since I was too lazy to pull out the 600/4, the gimbal is a bit overkill):
View attachment 202503

By simply rotating the gimbal side clamp 90°, the upright part of the L-bracket allows the camera to be mounted:
View attachment 202504

Am I missing something about what you're trying to do? You mention balance, but you should be able to lock the gimbal clamp in whatever orientation you want, e.g. with the camera level. That's what I did above. Of course, if you have no tension on the clamp pivot, then you're right about balance being an issue. This is what happens when I loosen the large knob opposite the clamp (I was gentle since I knew what would happen):
View attachment 202505

There's an easy (but not free) solution to that, and the clue to it is in my head's designation – PG stands for pano-gimbal. Although I usually use it as a gimbal head, it can also be used to make panoramas. Doing that 'properly' means rotating the camera/lens around the nodal point of the lens itself (which varies from lens to lens). The solution to that is actually the same solution to balancing the side-mounted camera body on the gimbal (since the rig has to be balanced for rotation around the nodal point). That solution is called a nodal slide. I have the RRS MPR-CL II, and with that locked into the side gimbal clamp and the L-bracket attached to the clamp that is integrated into the nodal slide, with the knob loosened the rig can be slid back and forth in the clamp to the balance point (which is why it's called a nodal slide):
View attachment 202506

(Technically, just balancing the rig doesn't mean you'll be rotating around the nodal point for a pano, it's more complex than that...but if your goal is a balanced rig so the gimbal acts like one, that does the trick.)

Incidentally, if you want to use the cradle clamp so you have a full gimbal, but use that with a camera body mounted, the answer is the same – a nodal slide. As you can see from the design, the rail sits fore-aft in the bottom clamp (same orientation as a lens foot), but the clamp integrated into the slide allows you to attach the camera base plate (no L-bracket needed) that is oriented 90° to the gimbal clamp.
View attachment 202507

Hope some of that long post helps sort you out!
Thanks very much! Yes, you are on track in that the L bracket would get me a camera mounted to the gimbal and functional without balance. I already have an arca-swiss foot on my 70-200 so the lenses that could benefit are the 24-70 F4 and the 11-24. As you've perhaps noticed I am more into birds and animal photography but I would like to do more landscapes and perhaps pano's but I'll have to give more thought to your information after a good nights rest. Each advancing year makes all these things more challenging. So, more later.

Jack
 

JPAZ

If only I knew what I was doing.....
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Sep 8, 2012
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Thanks for the hint (TT holster).
I hadn't heard about it before, and just ordered one today to give it a try. One more example of how valuable Canonnrumors can be!
With a conventional strap loosely around my neck, the camera remained in the holster on my chest. And, if the weather turned or the terrain got bad, I’d zip the top of the holster practically closed. Taking a photo merely involved pulling the camera out of the holster. And, with the “extension” of the holster unzipped, could have the camera and a fairly long lens at the ready. This left my hands free.

Downside? Putting this on meant donning the chest harness, then the backpack, and finally the holster. Then would put the camera strap around my neck and put the camera into the holster suspended in front of me.

Had to remove the strap from my neck then disconnect the holster from the chest harness to remove the backpack at rest stops. And, here in the Southwest, wearing this setup was hot. And, while the holster did distribute the weight better than a strap, the heft was still on my shoulders and therefore my back.
 
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Del Paso

M3 Singlestroke
CR Pro
Aug 9, 2018
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With a conventional strap loosely around my neck, the camera remained in the holster on my chest. And, if the weather turned or the terrain got bad, I’d zip the top of the holster practically closed. Taking a photo merely involved pulling the camera out of the holster. And, with the “extension” of the holster unzipped, could have the camera and a fairly long lens at the ready. This left my hands free.

Downside? Putting this on meant donning the chest harness, then the backpack, and finally the holster. Then would put the camera strap around my neck and put the camera into the holster suspended in front of me.

Had to remove the strap from my neck then disconnect the holster from the chest harness to remove the backpack at rest stops. And, here in the Southwest, wearing this setup was hot. And, while the holster did distribute the weight better than a strap, the heft was still on my shoulders and therefore my back.
I' m bit confused.
Did you actually mean the "Tasmanian Tiger" camera holster? Because the one I ordered (and happy to have done so!) doesn't have a "zippable" extension, nor a top.
Mine just consists of a "velcroed" loop, which you strap onto the backpack's shoulder belt, and into which you slide the lens, camera hanging down.
PS: I apologize for the ugly invented adjectives...
 

JPAZ

If only I knew what I was doing.....
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Sep 8, 2012
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I' m bit confused.
Did you actually mean the "Tasmanian Tiger" camera holster? Because the one I ordered (and happy to have done so!) doesn't have a "zippable" extension, nor a top.
Mine just consists of a "velcroed" loop, which you strap onto the backpack's shoulder belt, and into which you slide the lens, camera hanging down.
PS: I apologize for the ugly invented adjectives...
Wow. Sorry about that. Was talking about the Think Tank Digital Holster. Need to be more careful with my abbreviations :rolleyes:
 
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