Industry News: Fujifilm officially announces the X-T4

russ

I'm New Here
Sep 29, 2012
13
6
I'd love to get one of these but I can't justify the price. Where I live, the Fuji is $2899 for the body only which costs even more than an EOS R and RF 35mm so I could never justify paying that much for an APSC body.
In Australia? I can understand why it would be more expensive than in the US with taxes but both are from Japan and Fuji has a lower list price so Fuji should be relatively less expensive. Hey, the EOS-R is a great camera, full frame and a few more MP than the Fuji so you'll be fine :)
 

russ

I'm New Here
Sep 29, 2012
13
6
I'm really sad that Canon can't seem to make a reasonably priced dual-card mirrorless camera. Same for Nikon. Meanwhile Fujifilm and Sony both offer really good dual-card cameras for under $2K.
The X-Tx is the top of the line for Fuji so they better have dual card slots for pros shooting weddings or they would not be happy. As we know, the EOS-R isn't top of the line so in Canon's mind it didn't need it. It's unfortunate and short sighted decision by Canon, in my opinion, but at least they have the EOS-R to show the way to something better (the R5 and R1). Even though I haven't shot a wedding in a few years I love dual card slots. With my X-T3 I use one for RAW and one for JPEG as a backup (for multiple RAW cards since JPEGs are so much smaller).
 
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russ

I'm New Here
Sep 29, 2012
13
6
Obviously their marketing thinks that the "Eterna Bleach Bypass Film Simulation" is a grand new thing. Sounds like those accidents that sometimes happen in my little film lab :devilish: That said, this is surely a nice camera, like most Fuji products. But I personally am no fan of this now lightly bleached and bypassed retro style look. If I want that, I take one of my original vintage rangefinders. With modern cameras I prefer advanced ergonomics with e.g. a pronounced grip. But design is a matter of taste, of course.
Yeah, I'm with you on that one. Not a fan. They introduced Pro Neg with the X-Pro3 and it's pretty nice.
 

russ

I'm New Here
Sep 29, 2012
13
6
I shoot weddings. No need to argue every positive and negative of every camera maker, or who "wins". I simply want dual cards on a reasonably priced (under $2K) mirrorless. Is that too much to ask for?
Sure isn't too much to ask for. I'd never want to shoot a wedding w/o dual cards. Too stressful. The Fuji is great for weddings.
 
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sanj

EOS R5
Jan 22, 2012
3,616
474
And what do you shoot or who shoots professionally with a crop sensor camera?

There is nothing to be sad about.

I am very sad that a Sony in camera menus are a total crap, weather protection is a joke, ergonomics are sh1t, skin tones are all wrong, customer service is a joke...
now the second card issue aside for a non professional crop sensor platform, what else Canon make you sad about?
Fuji: I am sad about RAW files out of Fuji they are not as manageable as Canon RAW files. so here we have it. Canon wins hands down for photographers. Sony is a former specs leader. Canon killed it with R5. Fuji is a nice travel camera.
Many many. Many many many. Professionals shoot only with full frame is a myth.
 

SecureGSM

2 x 5D IV
Feb 26, 2017
2,368
1,240
Many many. Many many many. Professionals shoot only with full frame is a myth.
What do you shoot professionally with Rebels? Wild life, BIF?? There is a semi pro 7D line of products that is no longer as it was an experimental niche product line spin up that never really took off. ( I am going to get fried over burning coals for this, I know) Nikon killed that product line for the same reason. Numbers just do not stack up against initial projections.

Crop cameras are high ISO limited. In majority of commercial photography applications we are not reach limited but ISO limited. Hence 1D and 5D product line are built around full frame tech.

Now.... how many times birders are going to call me a name following this post. Oh, my...... :)
 

Hillsilly

EOS R
Oct 16, 2010
1,100
2
If you're in Brisbane, CameraPro are showing the X-T4, X100V and X-T200 on Tuesday morning. I see that $2899 price as just indicative until they actually receive stock. It was only a few weeks ago that they were selling the X-T3 for $AUD1400, and I can't really believe the X-T4 is double the price. (Or if it is, just wait till the next Fuji sale - they happen every few months.)
 

dlee13

EOS 90D
May 13, 2014
169
36
Australia
WWW.photosbydlee.com
In Australia? I can understand why it would be more expensive than in the US with taxes but both are from Japan and Fuji has a lower list price so Fuji should be relatively less expensive. Hey, the EOS-R is a great camera, full frame and a few more MP than the Fuji so you'll be fine :)
Yes Australia! It really depends on the item here, I got the 6D2 at launch for $2350AUD despite it being $1999 USD at launch. I don’t plan to buy the Fuji I would be more interested in the R6 when it eventually launches assuming it is a 6D replacement.


If you're in Brisbane, CameraPro are showing the X-T4, X100V and X-T200 on Tuesday morning. I see that $2899 price as just indicative until they actually receive stock. It was only a few weeks ago that they were selling the X-T3 for $AUD1400, and I can't really believe the X-T4 is double the price. (Or if it is, just wait till the next Fuji sale - they happen every few months.)
I’m actually in Sydney! I order most of my stuff from CameraPro purely because of how good their prices and service usually are! For anyone here looking to buy one, hopefully they do reduce the price later on!
 
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Hillsilly

EOS R
Oct 16, 2010
1,100
2
I'm guessing it comes down to pixel density, perceived depth of field differences and the crop factor. All up, it means that a camera with one of Canon's newer APS-C sensors isn't at a significant disadvantage compared with most FF cameras when it comes to macros.
 

dslrdummy

EOS RP
Aug 28, 2012
376
145
In Australia? I can understand why it would be more expensive than in the US with taxes but both are from Japan and Fuji has a lower list price so Fuji should be relatively less expensive. Hey, the EOS-R is a great camera, full frame and a few more MP than the Fuji so you'll be fine :)
Our Aussie dollar is at an 11 year low against the US$, which is a major determinant of the price of imported products, even from Japan.
 
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russ

I'm New Here
Sep 29, 2012
13
6
Our Aussie dollar is at an 11 year low against the US$, which is a major determinant of the price of imported products, even from Japan.
Yep, I understand that, been going to Melbourne for work for 6 years now. That would just make all cameras expensive. I was just wondering why the Fuji would be worse than the EOS-R. Maybe you are just saying your EOS-R is already paid for and cameras in AU are expensive. Makes sense.
 

AdmiralFwiffo

Terrible photographer
Feb 17, 2020
42
53
Interesting - I'd not come across that view before. Is there any particular reason for this, or just one of those things? (Genuine question).
Thanks.
A lot of coins are quite close to the size of an APS-C sensor, and a lot of duplication and printing lenses are highly optimized for 1:1 magnification and have a dead-flat field.

You're also shooting at ISO 100, in manual focus, on a bellows or focusing helicoid, so nothing in a larger more expensive camera is needed. And you're diffraction limited at that magnification, so you don't need any pixel density higher than what's offered by something as old as a T2i.

Rebels became a kind-of "go-to" years ago because Canon had the best tethering software at the time, and used electronic first-curtain shutter in live-view. That's more common now, but Canon did it a lot sooner than other brands, and they never advertised the feature for some reason. Canons were also known for having less mirror slap for some reason (when it's not locked up), which is an advantage for macro.

Here's a thread on a popular coin forum describing a complete coin photography setup based around a very old Rebel for less than $400. It will produce coin world-class whole-coin images, and cannot be improved upon with a better camera. The only small upgrade would be some clever light-shaping.

Here's a photo of my setup which produced the image I posted previously.

20200301_115231.jpg
 
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StoicalEtcher

EOS RP
CR Pro
Jan 3, 2018
331
266
Yorkshire
A lot of coins are quite close to the size of an APS-C sensor, and a lot of duplication and printing lenses are highly optimized for 1:1 magnification and have a dead-flat field.

You're also shooting at ISO 100, in manual focus, on a bellows or focusing helicoid, so nothing in a larger more expensive camera is needed. And you're diffraction limited at that magnification, so you don't need any pixel density higher than what's offered by something as old as a T2i.

Rebels became a kind-of "go-to" years ago because Canon had the best tethering software at the time, and used electronic first-curtain shutter in live-view. That's more common now, but Canon did it a lot sooner than other brands, and they never advertised the feature for some reason. Canons were also known for having less mirror slap for some reason (when it's not locked up), which is an advantage for macro.

Here's a thread on a popular coin forum describing a complete coin photography setup based around a very old Rebel for less than $400. It will produce coin world-class whole-coin images, and cannot be improved upon with a better camera. The only small upgrade would be some clever light-shaping.

Here's a photo of my setup which produced the image I posted previously.

View attachment 188978
That's great - thank you very much for taking the time and effort to share!
Cheers.
 
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