Interview: Canon addresses overheating concerns, workarounds and the Cripple Hammer

Sep 11, 2020
2
0
I'll give it a shot. My guess is...

Canon can and probably does know how much heat the CPU generates for each specific operation (stills shooting, 8K video recording) by testing the electronics without the body in a lab. With this knowledge, their programmers probably felt that that using the operation and time was a better way of determining shut down than continually reading the temperature(s).
So you mean in their labs with different climate sorroundings and then choosen the middle best time frame for cooling between the "arctic"-lab, the "north-and-south-america"-lab and the "i don´t believe in climate change so i didn´t thought about 35 degrees celcius mid summer possible even in europe" lab?

This is a lot of testing instead of relying on, a pretty new technology, called temp sensors...
 

nchoh

EOS RP
Apr 3, 2018
290
168
Calgary
So you mean in their labs with different climate sorroundings and then choosen the middle best time frame for cooling between the "arctic"-lab, the "north-and-south-america"-lab and the "i don´t believe in climate change so i didn´t thought about 35 degrees celcius mid summer possible even in europe" lab?

This is a lot of testing instead of relying on, a pretty new technology, called temp sensors...
Nope, heat generation is independent of the external temperature, only need one lab to determine that. Basic physics.

Try harder...
 
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melgross

EOS RP
Nov 2, 2016
597
391
One confusion seems to be that these external temperatures are only decided by Canon, rather than also being about standards that Canon is expected to adhere to.


And Im sure they have zero interest in it being optional given the potential for lawsuits where people swear it was turned off and they got burned anyway.
There are no standards regarding external body temperatures. There are manufacturer data sheets telling of temperature limits that should be held to. But they’re not written in stone. I used to design pro audio products for a company I was a partner in. We could buy devices with differing temp cutoffs. Chips, for example came in different packages. Plastic was consumer level usually with a 65 degree C rating. Commercial chips were metal packages with an 80-85 C rating, and ceramic with a 105C rating. The chips inside were usually exactly the same, just differences in packaging.

the heat recommendations don’t just matter in an absolute sense, but also in a cycle sense. You would get many more on off cycles with higher rated packages. Generally, most CPU and memory chips are not run higher than 60C. But sometimes they may exceed those ratings for short periods. Come too close too often, and chip life is reduced. It’s up to the manufacturer to decide how they want to handle that. Sony solved an overheating problem by just turning the cutoff up in a firmware update. Canon says the better integrated the external heat measurements with the internal ones to give the camera some idea as to how the body was responding, as so to decide whether the internal temps would be able to have their heat drained more quickly, or less quickly.
 

Aregal

EOS M6 Mark II
Oct 3, 2018
70
66
Let’s be honest.

1. the idea of a hybrid camera, in the R5/R6 is pretty good.

2.Canon dropped the ball on what it can do. The marketing was wrong and misleading

3. We do look at other manufacturers and we do feel like canon could make something a little more inline with what content creators want
E.g. longer record time, really great 1080 and 4K without having to be limited in anyways, A GOOD AUDIO SOLUTION and a decent dynamic range.

I do feel that the camera(s) that the have released are great and check many of the boxes we wanted but those cameras did Mia the mark slightly. The glass and auto focus are great. The ability to navigate through the menus are great but those aspects alone won’t make us not look at Sony. I love canon but Sony is listening. Like why no 1080p 120 or 240 frames. That’s easy to do through firmware.

I wish canon would stop “anticipating” what we want and actually listen to what we want

4.These are great cameras. Great hybrid cameras and we are happy Canon made them.

5. we are still waiting for ourCanon holy grail camera for creators. One that looks good and doesn’t have many “artificial” limitations.
A camera we can be proud to endorse to other creators and friends without having to give a disclaimer before recommending the camera.

To answer 3: I feel like canon did deliver what the "big" YouTubers were wanting; full frame 4K, IBIS, and 120fps (although in 4K only). Why is that important? I feel it's because of the hits that these content creators generate are measurable. (I used to work with Samsung marketing execs.) Having measurable stats drives monies for future campaigns.


I know is where I get subjective, but I feel the current image that the R5 produces is great and I've never felt the need for Canon Log 3 (I've worked with ARRI RAW, R3D, Canon RAW and Slog2). I've been saying this for nearly the past 3 months and my R5 has not overheated or given me a temperature warning on my projects. The most I've seen is my 4K120 clock drop to 5min and my 8K clock drop to 7min.

To answer 5: Canon has always played the "conservative" card. Who remember the Canon XL2 vs. Panasonic DVX100A/B days? Canon always seems to sit in the back row and see what everyone elses does before they offer something....and when they do, it seems to under deliver but many seem to end up liking it in the end.

The R5 was definitly Canon stepping outside of their comfort-zone, which many asked, and they got crucified for it. Honestly, I don't think we'll ever see a bold offering from Canon again because of the initial market backlash.

The C500ii, 1DxIII, C300iii, and R5 was the new supercharged trajectory Canon was heading. We'll see if that continues with the C70/C50.

TLDR; I think the R5 is a stellar product and a gorgeous image in both stills and video.