Lightroom 6 is the last perpetual offering of Lightroom

bitm2007

EOS RP
May 20, 2013
367
7
"Lightroom 6 is the last stand-alone version of Lightroom that can be purchased outside of a Creative Cloud membership. There will not be a Lightroom 7 perpetual offering. Lightroom 6 will remain for sale for an undetermined amount of time, but will no longer be updated with camera support or bug fixes after the end of 2017. Lightroom 6.13 with support for the Nikon D850 will be released on October 26th, 2017"

https://www.theverge.com/2017/10/18/16494080/lightroom-cc-adobe-update-release-price-photography
 

Mt Spokane Photography

I post too Much on Here!!
CR Pro
Mar 25, 2011
16,618
1,577
There is a trick to use for editing raw images for non supported cameras. Raw images are all basically tiff images with some added flags, and then rolled into a wrapper. Canon uses lossless compression to make the file smaller, it expands to full size when opened to edit.

Canon DPP can convert the raw image into a tiff file that can be edited in any version of photoshop or lightroom. You can convert a single image, or batch convert a entire folder of images. You won't gain any new features added to Lightroom, but you can use the method to convert and edit images from new cameras into the forseeable future. You can also convert Raws to DNG files, which are also tiff files in a wrapper, and there are compression options as well.

So, its a additional step, but not a show stopper for those who want perpetual use of LR6.

The show stopper will come when Apple and / or Windows stops supporting LR6. That has already happened with older LR versions.
 

Orangutan

EOS 5D Mark IV
Sep 25, 2010
2,140
3
Mt Spokane Photography said:
Raw images are all basically tiff images with some added flags, and then rolled into a wrapper.

Hmmm...I was under the impression that the data is not RGB, as it is with TIFF. Instead, it's the digital Bayer array data taken directly from the sensor (following the A/D conversion process). The demosaicing process then interpolates RGB pixels based on the luminance values and known positions of color microfilters in the Bayer array.

But I could be wrong.
 

privatebydesign

EOS-1D X Mark III
CR Pro
Jan 29, 2011
9,823
4,473
Orangutan said:
Mt Spokane Photography said:
Raw images are all basically tiff images with some added flags, and then rolled into a wrapper.

Hmmm...I was under the impression that the data is not RGB, as it is with TIFF. Instead, it's the digital Bayer array data taken directly from the sensor (following the A/D conversion process). The demosaicing process then interpolates RGB pixels based on the luminance values and known positions of color microfilters in the Bayer array.

But I could be wrong.
I don't know but I do know my 1D RAW files were TIFF's, they predated .CR and .CR2 files.
 

Hjalmarg1

Photo Hobbyist
Oct 8, 2013
775
4
50
Doha, Qatar
Mt Spokane Photography said:
There is a trick to use for editing raw images for non supported cameras. Raw images are all basically tiff images with some added flags, and then rolled into a wrapper. Canon uses lossless compression to make the file smaller, it expands to full size when opened to edit.

Canon DPP can convert the raw image into a tiff file that can be edited in any version of photoshop or lightroom. You can convert a single image, or batch convert a entire folder of images. You won't gain any new features added to Lightroom, but you can use the method to convert and edit images from new cameras into the forseeable future. You can also convert Raws to DNG files, which are also tiff files in a wrapper, and there are compression options as well.

So, its a additional step, but not a show stopper for those who want perpetual use of LR6.

The show stopper will come when Apple and / or Windows stops supporting LR6. That has already happened with older LR versions.
Besides LR&PS, which other non_Adobe processor may be the best for managing Canon RAW files? I like the flexibility of stand alone licenses. Any advise?
 

bitm2007

EOS RP
May 20, 2013
367
7
Mt Spokane Photography said:
Canon DPP can convert the raw image into a tiff file that can be edited in any version of photoshop or lightroom. You can convert a single image, or batch convert a entire folder of images. You won't gain any new features added to Lightroom, but you can use the method to convert and edit images from new cameras into the forseeable future. You can also convert Raws to DNG files, which are also tiff files in a wrapper, and there are compression options as well.

Doesn't converting a CR2 to tiff limit the amount of recoverable highlight and shadow detail, which is one of the primary reasons that photography shot RAW ?
 

Nat_WA

EOS RP
Aug 15, 2017
706
373
Netherlands
bitm2007 said:
Mt Spokane Photography said:
Canon DPP can convert the raw image into a tiff file that can be edited in any version of photoshop or lightroom. You can convert a single image, or batch convert a entire folder of images. You won't gain any new features added to Lightroom, but you can use the method to convert and edit images from new cameras into the forseeable future. You can also convert Raws to DNG files, which are also tiff files in a wrapper, and there are compression options as well.

Doesn't converting a CR2 to tiff limit the amount of recoverable highlight and shadow detail, which is one of the primary reasons that photography shot RAW ?

As far as I know, converting the RAW files into DNG or TIFF (16bits per pixel!) will not decrease the detail in the image (high- or lowlights). It will only expand the RAW into separate RGB channels (so the resulting file will be about 3x as large, without compression). As long as the A/D convertors in the camera do not exceed 16 bits, both DNG and 3x16bit TIFF will not cause degradation of your image.
Obviously, the program used to do the conversion of RAW to {whatever} is critical for the quality of the result...
 

LDS

EOS 5D Mark IV
Sep 14, 2012
1,714
247
Orangutan said:
Hmmm...I was under the impression that the data is not RGB, as it is with TIFF. Instead, it's the digital Bayer array data taken directly from the sensor (following the A/D conversion process). The demosaicing process then interpolates RGB pixels based on the luminance values and known positions of color microfilters in the Bayer array.

TIFF files are basically containers for data, although designed with image/graphics/DTP applications in mind (that's why it supports multiple pages). It can contain multiple data in different formats.

CR2 are TIFF files, but contain specific RAW data (plus metadata, JPEG previews, etc.), and only applications that recognize them can understand them. Of course "RAW" means you get the raw sensor data, and the first step needed to make them meaningful is demosacing.

Just, when most people speak about TIFF files they mostly mean "Baseline" TIFFs, which is a common standard which implements the basic TIFF features, but it can store not only RGB data, but also CMYK and a few other common formats.
 

Talys

Canon R5
CR Pro
Feb 16, 2017
2,076
357
Vancouver, BC
Mt Spokane Photography said:
There is a trick to use for editing raw images for non supported cameras. Raw images are all basically tiff images with some added flags, and then rolled into a wrapper. Canon uses lossless compression to make the file smaller, it expands to full size when opened to edit.

Canon DPP can convert the raw image into a tiff file that can be edited in any version of photoshop or lightroom. You can convert a single image, or batch convert a entire folder of images. You won't gain any new features added to Lightroom, but you can use the method to convert and edit images from new cameras into the forseeable future. You can also convert Raws to DNG files, which are also tiff files in a wrapper, and there are compression options as well.

So, its a additional step, but not a show stopper for those who want perpetual use of LR6.

The show stopper will come when Apple and / or Windows stops supporting LR6. That has already happened with older LR versions.

DNGs are actually good because you can use them with Xright Colorchecker, AND there's a convenient (and free!) Adobe tool that can painlessly batch process your photos from CR2 to DNG. It's even pretty fast.

The problem with DNG (or TIFF) in lightroom, though, is if you're stuck in an old version of Lightroom, you have no new camera or lens support -- so you'd be manually correcting the vignetting on your new 5DSR Mark II and 200-600 f/4-5.6L IS that you got next year :D

TBH, if I didn't want to spend on Lightroom subscription, I'd just say screw it and use DPP. The only thing that I really miss in DPP is dehazing and Colorchecker (and third party lenses). It's kind of slow for some things, too, but I'd live.

But hey, it's free and will forever support all Canon bodies and lenses. Plus, it's excellent for culling, IMO, which is what I really like Lightroom for. And on the plus side, there's no catalog to worry about; everything is in XMPs that are easy to shuffle around.

To put on the other shoe, the real reason I started using Lightroom was probably because I get it free with both creative cloud (the full suite) and Photoshop + LR. I can't get out of at least 1 subscription of each -- I need 3 activations of Photoshop, and I absolutely must have InDesign and Illustrator at work and home, because people send me files in those formats. So the logic a while back was, "I might as well use it".
 

bitm2007

EOS RP
May 20, 2013
367
7
Persuading Lightroom 6 users to switch to Lightroom CC is going to be tough.

If you give us $9.99 a month, you will have access to an all new version of Lightroom CC that has a develop mode with less functionality than you are use to (no tone curve, split toning or calibration panel's and less noise and sharpening options etc), and you won't get the Map, Book, Slideshow, Print and Web modules that you have become accustomed too either, or the photomerge options (HDR and panoramic) or the new features like color range and luminance masking that were added to Lightroom CC classic on Wednesday, but you do get 1TB of cloud storage and the hassle of learning the ins and outs of the new version of Lightroom, which you can access at home/work or on mobile devises, but you will need to pay an additional $10 a month for each additional 1TB of storage that you need.

I'm still learning the in's and out's of LR CC myself, so correct me if any of this is incorrect.

Being unable to print is the biggest omission of all in my option, have we really reach the point where LR users only want to view and share there work online ?
 
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