Patent: Canon RF 11-24mm f/4L and Canon RF 8-24mm f/4L Fisheye

InchMetric

Switched from Nikon. Still zooming the wrong way.
CR Pro
Jun 22, 2021
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Ok I'm being picky. Am I the only one that hates odd numbers in focal lengths? Why 11-24mm? Can't they push it a bit further to 10mm? If not, just leave it at 12mm.

Also hate f7.1
Because the number they use is probably a lie, exaggerating the true number for marketing appeal. If it’s “11” it’s probably a 12 not a 10.
 
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entoman

wildlife photography
May 8, 2015
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Sure sure. I was speaking for myself. :) I would use this lens for architecture and landscape where I would be mostly at f11. So prefer a lighter lens with minimal vignetting. The use of this lens would rarely, if ever, encounter focus hunting (for me).
Have you thought about getting a tilt-shift for your landscape and architecture? Would seem much more suitable than any zoom. Sure, it's easy to correct converging verticals in post (with some loss of definition) but with a tilt-shift you can see the effect in the EVF *before* you take the photo. There are masses of mint secondhand Canon T/S-E lenses on the market at affordable prices, or there's the excellent Laowa 15mm Zero D Shift. Highly recommended.

I use the Canon 24mm T/S-E for a lot of my landscape and architecture work, but wider is better - 15mm or 17mm are ideal and you can always crop for a narrower field of view when needed. The only "drawback" of tilt-shift lenses is that they are usually completely manual, so slower to use, but for your genres of photography, slowing the pace often results in the best images ;)
 
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Jul 21, 2010
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I use the Canon 24mm T/S-E for a lot of my landscape and architecture work, but wider is better - 15mm or 17mm are ideal and you can always crop for a narrower field of view when needed.
I use the TS-E 17 and 24 for architecture. I find the 17 more useful in Europe, where there is often less open space around interesting buildings.

In addition to cropping, you can also use a teleconverter with a TS lens. The 1.4x behind the TS-E 17 gives an effective TS-E 24 With very good IQ (and the loss of a stop is likely irrelevant for most TS uses).
 
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entoman

wildlife photography
May 8, 2015
1,998
2,438
UK
I use the TS-E 17 and 24 for architecture. I find the 17 more useful in Europe, where there is often less open space around interesting buildings.

In addition to cropping, you can also use a teleconverter with a TS lens. The 1.4x behind the TS-E 17 gives an effective TS-E 24 With very good IQ (and the loss of a stop is likely irrelevant for most TS uses).
Yes, I wish I'd bought the 17mm T/S-E instead of the 24mm. The wider lens (remembering back to when I had a 16-35mm, which was stolen) is more useful for forest scenes, mountain landscapes etc although the 24mm is wide enough most of the time. I've just bought the RF100-500mm though, so funds available for photography are a bit limited for the rest of the year - too many other priorities (mainly travel) :)
 
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A little off-topic but can someone suggest a good, practical reference book on optics as relates to camera lenses... not looking for massive optical formulas but rather a book or document with loads of illustrations and the fundamentals... not a complete technical idiot as I am an engineer (Materials Scientist) but must have skipped the optics lessons in physics classes... always amazed at the knowledge base on this site and appreciate any input in advance...
 
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