Show your Bird Portraits

AlanF

Stay at home
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Aug 16, 2012
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Just for fun. Horrible quality and taken from a mile away.

Crab - it's what's for dinner.

WOW! Mile away?!!!!

Let's estimate the distance, assuming the eagle is ~90 cm long.
For the closest distance, if Bert was showing the full image, downsized by the website to the usual 2048 px wide, and his 100-400mm II at 400mm, then the calculated distance is 80m or 0.05 miles.
At the other extreme, suppose he was using an R5 with the lens at 560mm with his TC, and he had cropped the image to 2048 px, then the distance would be 450m or 0.28 miles.
A slight exaggeration, or just poetic licence.;)
 
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AlanF

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Aug 16, 2012
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Went out to find the Little Grebe chick catching fish, this time fully armed with 700mm. And I was able to get pretty close to this small bird.

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ISv

"The equipment that matters, is you"
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Apr 30, 2017
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Shots from last weekend two different locations. (EOS-R + Sigma 60-600mm).
A lesser yellowlegs sandpiper flying away.
View attachment 192582
And another two searching for food.
View attachment 192583
bhf3737 - I like your shots but I have some problems with the ID: these two species are really hard (if hard is enough!) but in generally the Lesser Yellowlegs have dark bill from the base to the point (or almost). From your photos I see bills lighter at the base (actually almost 1/2 of the bill) what is a feature of the Greater Yellow legs. The bill itself is kind of longer than one the Lessers will have - the Greaters have it. The slightly uplifted bill of the Greaters is not always seen! Good feature is the size of the bird if you can compare it with something (not helping in this case, except you did measure the size of the stones around:)). If I'm right and you have the Greater Yellowlegs - I'm really jellos: these are very rare vagrants here... I'm not sure I will see one in my lifespan:cry:!
Good photos anyway!
 

ISv

"The equipment that matters, is you"
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In my "extremely rich" :)LOL:) vocabulary it's a shortcut to mathematics :)!
BTW thanks for teaching me one new word in English!
 

AlanF

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Aug 16, 2012
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In my "extremely rich" :)LOL:) vocabulary it's a shortcut to mathematics :)!
BTW thanks for teaching me one new word in English!
In US English it's Math, in British English it's Maths. That's another two for you (1+1 = 2).
 

bhf3737

---
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Sep 9, 2015
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Calgary, Canada
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bhf3737 - I like your shots but I have some problems with the ID: these two species are really hard (if hard is enough!) but in generally the Lesser Yellowlegs have dark bill from the base to the point (or almost). From your photos I see bills lighter at the base (actually almost 1/2 of the bill) what is a feature of the Greater Yellow legs. The bill itself is kind of longer than one the Lessers will have - the Greaters have it. The slightly uplifted bill of the Greaters is not always seen! Good feature is the size of the bird if you can compare it with something (not helping in this case, except you did measure the size of the stones around:)). If I'm right and you have the Greater Yellowlegs - I'm really jellos: these are very rare vagrants here... I'm not sure I will see one in my lifespan:cry:!
Good photos anyway!
Thanks ISv. Great observation. I just looked at the feather pattern towards the tail that seems to be a line of dots usually more visible in case of the Lesser. I did not notice the bill and I think you are right. CornellLab's All About Birds says that in the Lesser case the bill is shorter and its length from tip to base is almost the same as from the base to the back of the neck. In case of Greater, the bill is longer. So these were Greater Yellowlegs, I guess. As for size, from the point I saw them, they were about 30cm tall, I think. I hadn't seen them before, so one more in my bookmarks. Thanks again.
 
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ISv

"The equipment that matters, is you"
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Apr 30, 2017
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Thanks ISv. Great observation. I just looked at the feather pattern towards the tail that seems to be a line of dots usually more visible in case of the Lesser. I did not notice the bill and I think you are right. CornellLab's All About Birds says that in the Lesser case the bill is shorter and its length from tip to base is almost the same as from the base to the back of the neck. In case of Greater, the bill is longer. So these were Greater Yellowlegs, I guess. As for size, from the point I saw them, they were about 30cm tall, I think. I hadn't seen them before, so one more in my bookmarks. Thanks again.
I wouldn't relay on the feather pattern since it changes with the age, season e.t.c. For these two species the size of the bird, the length of the bill, the coloration of the bill are the most important. There is one more feature that should separate them in the field/photos: in the Lesser the small feathers around the base of the bill are reaching to the nostril. In the Greater they are separated from the nostril. In my photos of the Lesser I found this hard to see (on some photos it is "check" in others no: the angle of the view and how dirty/wet these feathers (and the base of the bill) are, makes it not very reliable in the field or from photos (at least my photos - I did'n have an optimal light).
 
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ISv

"The equipment that matters, is you"
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Apr 30, 2017
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These are from today: Black-necked Stilt (the Hawaiian subspecies - Himantopus mexicanus knudseni). Cog posted recently photos of the Black-winged Stilt and bhf3737 of the nominal Black-necked (both on page 1069 i think).
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Billybob

800mm f/11 because a cellphone isn't long enough!
May 22, 2016
228
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I took the 100-500L out for a spin, and I was thoroughly impressed. The f/7.1 max aperture at 500mm was not an issue at all. It was great and amazing having this much flexibility in such a small package.


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Still working on my BIF technique. These will look better with practice.
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I was amazed to see sandhill crane here in Florida in the summer. I thought that they all migrated north. Regardless, I was extremely happy to see a couple hanging out in the Florida heat.
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A bit of a cheat. It's easier catching egrets in flight soon after they take off.
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And the Great Egret is simply a beautiful bird.
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Is this really a birds-only forum? Here's a bonus, a Gulf Fritillary, which is a gorgeous butterfly from the underside.
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