Tamron Launches SP 35mm f/1.8 Di VC USD & SP 45mm f/1.8 Di VC USD

The Sigma inspiration, in strategy as in design, will be hard to deny ... but hey, I like what Sigma is doing, so I'm not complaining :)

Anyway, even though I'm not planning on purchasing either lens, this is still exciting. There's a lot of interesting details with these lenses, the close focusing, the weather resistance ... And although it's hard to judge at this point, from the early samples, the bokeh looks pretty special on both lenses.

Now that's enough announcements for the 35mm lenses. Tamron, Sigma, Canon, kudos, you've done great in that area. Now it's time to show the 85's some love !
 
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GammyKnee

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Jan 24, 2013
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Hmm.. I'll be keeping an eye on that 45 as a possible alternative to the Sigma 50 Art.

Supposedly the Sigma 50 lenses (both Art and pre-Art) have a slightly wider field of view than the Canon 50s (46.5mm equivalent in TDP's review). Maybe Tamron's lens is similar in that regard and they chose to badge it as 45mm? But if it's sharp wide open, has pleasant bokeh and behaves itself in the AF department, I don't think 5mm will bother me :)
 
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ahsanford

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Aug 16, 2012
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bereninga said:
Couldn't they be a little more creative w/ the outside design? Looks just like the new Sigmas. Smh.

Not to be rude -- I'm actually curious: who actually cares what the lens looks like?

My criteria for the visual / industrial design of a lens are all tied to functionality:

* Are the focus/zoom rings in the right place?

* Are the non-control surfaces (i.e. the unused outer barrel) great for handling/holding/gripping, etc.?

* Can I access the AF and IS switches while I'm holding the camera and my eye is at the viewfinder?

* Does reversing the hood block access to switches or the distance scale?

* [... 5-10 other functional considerations I shall not enumerate ...]

* [dead, dead last] Is it a horrible eye-sore to look at? Does it stick out like a sore thumb? (i.e. is it meant to be kitted with a neon yellow SLR body or some other nonsense)

Provided it's not heinously ugly appearance-wise, I really don't care. I love Canon's design/handling from it's last 10 years or so lenses (less a fan of the 90s designs like the 50 f/1.4). I do not like the oooh factor Sigma Art shiny glossy bits near the mount because shiny/glossy = poor grip, and the matte bits (on the main barrel) don't afford me the same handling/grip the nice textured engineering plastic does on the more recent L lenses, like the 100L.

- A
 
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35 -> 45 -> 65 -> 85 ...?

65mm f/1.8 with image stabilization and 1:2 or 1:3 max reproduction ration would be very very interesting for me. I really LOVE the 40mm on APS-C but do not love APS-C sensor's rendering (at least 18MPix sensors from Canon) after experiencing what just the ole 5D classic can do in terms of color rendering/precision and stability against post processing. So something around 60-65mm with very high IQ, high aperture AND image stabilization would be a no brainer for me.
 
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infared

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Jul 19, 2011
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ahsanford said:
bereninga said:
Couldn't they be a little more creative w/ the outside design? Looks just like the new Sigmas. Smh.

Not to be rude -- I'm actually curious: who actually cares what the lens looks like?

My criteria for the visual / industrial design of a lens are all tied to functionality:

* Are the focus/zoom rings in the right place?

* Are the non-control surfaces (i.e. the unused outer barrel) great for handling/holding/gripping, etc.?

* Can I access the AF and IS switches while I'm holding the camera and my eye is at the viewfinder?

* Does reversing the hood block access to switches or the distance scale?

* [... 5-10 other functional considerations I shall not enumerate ...]

* [dead, dead last] Is it a horrible eye-sore to look at? Does it stick out like a sore thumb? (i.e. is it meant to be kitted with a neon yellow SLR body or some other nonsense)

Provided it's not heinously ugly appearance-wise, I really don't care. I love Canon's design/handling from it's last 10 years or so lenses (less a fan of the 90s designs like the 50 f/1.4). I do not like the oooh factor Sigma Art shiny glossy bits near the mount because shiny/glossy = poor grip, and the matte bits (on the main barrel) don't afford me the same handling/grip the nice textured engineering plastic does on the more recent L lenses, like the 100L.

- A

Some of us REALLY enjoy a good looking AND great performing lens. ..... Let's just say "we want it all". The Sigma Art Series are beautiful design and handily outshine their old, (gold-trimmed *ugh*) lens designs. I own 2 art lenses and I have to say I get enjoyment every time I lay my eyes on them...oh and when I look at the image results, too! ;D
 
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I only wish I had a dollar for every time some armchair expert in manufacturing defended Canon in a knowing tone, saying that a stabilized sub-2.0 50mm lens would cost hundreds and hundreds more to manufacture so Canon would have to charge thousands for it. I could pick up the 45mm and then have some left over to buy my own private island. ;)
 
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Ladislav

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Feb 13, 2013
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I already have one SP lens. While I believe these lenses will deliver solid IQ and AF performance for still images, I would not buy them as general purpose primes if they share the same AF technology used in other SP lenses. Unless 35mm version beats Canon f/2 a lot in terms of IQ it makes it too expensive as Canon already delivers great performance and works for both still and motion images for lower price. Tamron 35mm may become interesting option after initial price goes down.

It would be interesting to know how long did Tamron work on these lenses and how close they are in design (how much they share for production). That could possibly explain why Tamron starts with 35mm when there are already very solid competitors from Canon and Sigma. It could also explain why Tamron chose to deliver 35mm and 45mm - just 10mm difference in this focal range seems too small. It is very unlikely that many people will be considering buying both these lenses. That could be different if they instead released 35mm and 55mm. It would be also very different story if they released 55mm and 85mm because neither of these focal lengths currently offers fast prime with image stabilization.

My personal 2+ year experience with Tamron SP lens could be summarized to:
  • 24-70/2.8 VC is good value for money BUT you get what you paid for
  • Item variance - my first one visited service center 3 times before I got replacement. On the other hand warranty seems to work pretty well.
  • Initial problems with Canon bodies released after the lens - the lens drained the battery even when camera was turned off. Visiting service center fixed the issue.
  • Good IQ - after all it is the lens I use the most of the time because of its universal focal range, good max aperture and image stabilization.
  • Good image stabilization. I don't know how many stops Tamron claims to have but I rarely get much more than 2 stops from any of my stabilized lenses. Tamron does not fall behind L grade lenses.
  • Not so good AF - AF works pretty well for still images but it is slow and unreliable in AF Servo mode. It gets especially bad when the motion goes toward the camera. It can be combination of lens and camera (6D is not exactly the camera for motion photography) but I don't have so many problems with my L grade glass. The AF servo performance is IMO close to what 50mm STM delivers. In case of 6D, AF servo and non-center focus points is especially bad combination.
  • While PR materials talk about "weather resistance" it is not a weather sealing! Weather sealing is close to none. Both lenses showed problems very quickly even in very light rain. I got mist over internal element and in one case my camera refused to work because of faulty connection with the lens - replacing for L glass solved the problem instantly. I would not use the lens without additional protection even in drizzle. Plastic bag over the lens and the camera is enough.
 
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Random Orbits said:
siegsAR said:
The actual lens IQ aside:
Canon 35 IS vs. Tamron 35 VC

$549 - $599
11.8 oz - 16.9 oz
2.78” - 3.2 in" length
f/2 - f/1.8
f/22 - f/16
10/8 - 10/9 lenses/groups
9.4” - 7.9" mfd
1:2.4 - 1:2.5 max. mag. ratio
Same filter size - 67mm.

It'll be interesting to see the results of the lens test. The 35 f/2 IS competes well against the 35A, which has been the standard for IQ since it came out (AF issues aside). For Tamron to release a competitor to the 35 f/2 IS at a higher price for 1/3 stop advantage doesn't seem like a winning formula to me. Max magnification ratio is about the same, and the Tamron is bigger and heavier...

+1 Unless the image quality of the Tamron 35/1.8 IS is significantly better than the Canon 35/2 IS (the Canon is terrific, so a difficult task), I can't see many people paying more for this 3rd party lens. The Tammy is also significantly larger and heavier than the Canon, and the small size of the EF 35/2 IS is one of its strengths for me.

The 45mm on the other hand, might sell well, and I would consider one depending on how it tests in the field. I really like the 50mm focal length and currently own the nice little Canon 50 STM. I'm happy with the STM, but would like to upgrade to an image stabilized lens with better build quality. Auto focus accuracy and speed are important to me as well, so I'll be watching the reviews of the Tamron on this aspect.
 
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LonelyBoy

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Feb 18, 2015
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riveraktre said:
The design looks quite similar from the Sigma Art series lenses...hmmmm lol

Bah - they also look very similar to Canon's EF-M lenses (and I think STM, though I'm too lazy to go look at mine at this hour of the morning). Making a lens barrel the same diameter all the way (after the mount) and a right-sized, finely-ribbed focus ring will make the lens look the same as every other lens that does that, and that's what modern normal lenses typically look like.
 
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LonelyBoy said:
riveraktre said:
The design looks quite similar from the Sigma Art series lenses...hmmmm lol

Bah - they also look very similar to Canon's EF-M lenses (and I think STM, though I'm too lazy to go look at mine at this hour of the morning). Making a lens barrel the same diameter all the way (after the mount) and a right-sized, finely-ribbed focus ring will make the lens look the same as every other lens that does that, and that's what modern normal lenses typically look like.

I'm just glad that Sigma and Tamron have learned that putting a gold plastic ring around a lens does not make it classy. I'm a big fan of the more modern, clean design direction that these lenses are taking.
 
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rs

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Dec 29, 2012
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TWI by Dustin Abbott said:
LonelyBoy said:
riveraktre said:
The design looks quite similar from the Sigma Art series lenses...hmmmm lol

Bah - they also look very similar to Canon's EF-M lenses (and I think STM, though I'm too lazy to go look at mine at this hour of the morning). Making a lens barrel the same diameter all the way (after the mount) and a right-sized, finely-ribbed focus ring will make the lens look the same as every other lens that does that, and that's what modern normal lenses typically look like.

I'm just glad that Sigma and Tamron have learned that putting a gold plastic ring around a lens does not make it classy. I'm a big fan of the more modern, clean design direction that these lenses are taking.

My Sigma 50 (non Art) had a gold ring, and it appeared to be simply thin gold self adhesive tape in a groove as it was lifting up slightly at the end.
 
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rs said:
TWI by Dustin Abbott said:
LonelyBoy said:
riveraktre said:
The design looks quite similar from the Sigma Art series lenses...hmmmm lol

Bah - they also look very similar to Canon's EF-M lenses (and I think STM, though I'm too lazy to go look at mine at this hour of the morning). Making a lens barrel the same diameter all the way (after the mount) and a right-sized, finely-ribbed focus ring will make the lens look the same as every other lens that does that, and that's what modern normal lenses typically look like.

I'm just glad that Sigma and Tamron have learned that putting a gold plastic ring around a lens does not make it classy. I'm a big fan of the more modern, clean design direction that these lenses are taking.

My Sigma 50 (non Art) had a gold ring, and it appeared to be simply thin gold self adhesive tape in a groove as it was lifting up slightly at the end.

You're probably right, which furthers the point at hand.
 
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Luds34

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May 15, 2014
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GammyKnee said:
Hmm.. I'll be keeping an eye on that 45 as a possible alternative to the Sigma 50 Art.

Supposedly the Sigma 50 lenses (both Art and pre-Art) have a slightly wider field of view than the Canon 50s (46.5mm equivalent in TDP's review). Maybe Tamron's lens is similar in that regard and they chose to badge it as 45mm? But if it's sharp wide open, has pleasant bokeh and behaves itself in the AF department, I don't think 5mm will bother me :)

I've heard that too. I own the "pre-Art" Sigma and I have never taken the time to check the FOV or compare it to a Canon 50mm. And of course I've been shooting so much at wider focal lengths that when I put on the Sigma it feels long. I think unless if one were swapping lenses back to back, anything in that 45mm to 55mm would feel pretty normal. But yes, word on the street is the Sigma is shorter then 50mm.

I think the bonus this 45mm might have over the Sigma is that you hear a lot more about focus issues with Sigma. You don't hear issues with Tamron focusing and my personal experience with Tamron has been they have the focus stuff down.
 
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StudentOfLight

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Here are my observations:
1) Tamron appears to be highlighting their weather-sealing attempts in the marketing of these lenses, a feature which the 35/2 IS does not offer.
2) The MTF curves also look promising, nothing that would appear to threaten the new 35L II, but they do look slightly better than the 35/2 IS (Although IRRC the 35/2 IS did slightly outperform the theoretic curves posted by Canon. So it might be close)
3) It has a 67mm front fiter vs the 35/2 IS which is only 58mm. Perhaps this will result in lower vignette and better peripheral bokeh shape #?
4) It has a massive warranty which is not offered for the 35/2 IS

It will be interesting to see real world tests and the inevitable comparisons.

Based on initial impressions Tamron has definitely thrown a compelling option into the mix, giving customers something to think about. I'm keenly waiting for real world tests of these two. I'm currently leaning more toward 35L II in terms of 35mm FL, but in terms of the "50mm" FL might well opt for the Tamron 45mm instead of waiting for Canon to release something.
 
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Luds34

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May 15, 2014
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I also read a rumor that Tamron developed an 85mm f/1.8 VC lens as well. However they sold it to Zeiss and it has become the 85mm f/1.8 Batis. That is too bad as I know there are many on here looking for an updated 85mm with IS... aka getting the recent 24/28/35 treatment.

In any case, might explain a bit more why the 35mm and 45mm seems odd to choose two so close, when in fact there was really an 85mm as well.
 
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candyman

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Sep 27, 2011
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StudentOfLight said:
Here are my observations:
1) Tamron appears to be highlighting their weather-sealing attempts in the marketing of these lenses, a feature which the 35/2 IS does not offer.
2) The MTF curves also look promising, nothing that would appear to threaten the new 35L II, but they do look slightly better than the 35/2 IS (Although IRRC the 35/2 IS did slightly outperform the theoretic curves posted by Canon. So it might be close)
3) It has a 67mm front fiter vs the 35/2 IS which is only 58mm. Perhaps this will result in lower vignette and better peripheral bokeh shape #?
4) It has a massive warranty which is not offered for the 35/2 IS

It will be interesting to see real world tests and the inevitable comparisons.

Based on initial impressions Tamron has definitely thrown a compelling option into the mix, giving customers something to think about. I'm keenly waiting for real world tests of these two. I'm currently leaning more toward 35L II in terms of 35mm FL, but in terms of the "50mm" FL might well opt for the Tamron 45mm instead of waiting for Canon to release something.


The Canon 35 f/2 IS has a 67mm frontfilter
 
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ahsanford

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Aug 16, 2012
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Full res sample shots are here (pan down and click on the samples), but JPG only.

35mm:
http://www.thephoblographer.com/2015/09/02/first-impressions-tamron-35mm-f1-8-di-vc-canon-ef/
(I don't know if that section view gives any glimpses to how well sealed it will be?)

45mm:
http://www.thephoblographer.com/2015/09/02/first-impressions-tamron-45mm-f1-8-di-vc-canon-ef/

- A
 
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GammyKnee

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Jan 24, 2013
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For those who are interested there are some downloadable cr2 samples of the 35 and 45 shot with the 5DS/R towards the bottom of this gallery here:

http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/canon-5ds-r/canon-5ds-rGALLERY.HTM

Seeing quite a bit of purple fringing going on in one of the [email protected] shots (lady in the white top by the crossing). Impressive sharpness on the [email protected] shot of the photographer.

Looking forward to seeing some reviews...
 
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