The Canon RF 300mm f/2.8L IS USM appears to be getting closer [CR3]

AlanF

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It’s light enough, but the balance is better when a shoulder strap is connected to the collar vs the body. On a tripod, that better balance means less vibration.

Personally, if using the 100-500 at home I leave the collar off, but taking it for a hike or traveling I put the collar on.

However, I don’t think I’ve ever used the collar for my RF 70-200/2.8 (which is the same collar as on the 100-500).
Just back from a cycle ride - this time on a fold-up bike which I take in the car to some bird reserves. The R5/100-500 sits so nicely on my hip supported mainly by the collar that it's basically horizontal and doesn't bang into anything on my bike as I wobble along. It's at the ready if anything suddenly appears. The RF 100-400 doesn't have a collar but it's so light and the lens can be locked at 100mm that it is manageable just suspended from the body.
 

InchMetric

Switched from Nikon. Still zooming the wrong way.
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Technically, it's a long stretch to call mobile phone snapshots "photography". They're a fixed narrow aperture, mainly wide and ultrawide, auto-everything HDR point and shoot, so there's not much capacity to control the light, which is a critical part of the art of photography.

The skill in photography is for the photographers to be able to "see" great compositions, or know how to create them, and then adjust the camera to be able to picture what is seen or visualised. Mobile point and shoot cameras use an algorithm to determine all the camera settings for a scene based on their AI programming of what every other image of that sort looked like. They computer makes all the decisions and decides to make the photo look like nearly every other photo before it.

For someone who understands what they're doing, they can still work within the tight technical constraints of P&S mobile cameras to do photography, as limited as the tools may be, though their understanding in composition and lighting on the subject if the latter is in their control/timing.

Next time you're at a wedding or event and see someone hand a professional photographer a mobile and ask them to take a picture of them, watch the photogs facial expression! It's like WTF am I supposed to do with that! :)
I disagree with virtually everything in this post.
 
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David - Sydney

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"graph" comes from the Greek for "write", so the literal meaning is writing with light.
A better definition for -graphy as used in English is:
The English suffix -graphy means a "field of study" or related to "writing" a book, and is an anglicization of the French -graphie inherited from the Latin -graphia, which is a transliterated direct borrowing from Greek.
 
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David - Sydney

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Technically, it's a long stretch to call mobile phone snapshots "photography". They're a fixed narrow aperture, mainly wide and ultrawide, auto-everything HDR point and shoot, so there's not much capacity to control the light, which is a critical part of the art of photography.

The skill in photography is for the photographers to be able to "see" great compositions, or know how to create them, and then adjust the camera to be able to picture what is seen or visualised. Mobile point and shoot cameras use an algorithm to determine all the camera settings for a scene based on their AI programming of what every other image of that sort looked like. They computer makes all the decisions and decides to make the photo look like nearly every other photo before it.

For someone who understands what they're doing, they can still work within the tight technical constraints of P&S mobile cameras to do photography, as limited as the tools may be, though their understanding in composition and lighting on the subject if the latter is in their control/timing.

Next time you're at a wedding or event and see someone hand a professional photographer a mobile and ask them to take a picture of them, watch the photogs facial expression! It's like WTF am I supposed to do with that! :)
I'm not sure what you mean by "stretch"... of course it is photography... what else would you define it to be? Virtually everyone is a photographer now.

The "art of photography" could be something else but it is a nebulous concept at best. If you mean that you have to shoot on manual mode to be a photographer then I wouldn't be most of the time as I use shutter or aperture priority a lot.

Then you bring in "skill in photography" which is a different concept which assumes that you "correctly" (whatever that may mean) adjust the ISO/shutter/aperture/focus to get the final image that you want. Some of my most interesting photos were based on errors in that "skill". I still make mistakes that my camera (thankfully) was able to handle with high ISO when I accidentally pushed my shutter speed to 1/800s underwater yesterday. You don't even mention that post production skills can be equally valuable. I took a very expensive 60 minute private aerial flight in Iceland recently and the abstracts that I created in post brought the images to light (so to speak). The raw images were flat and somewhat boring.

To suggest that a professional photographer would turn their nose up at using a mobile phone is pure snobbishness! They each fulfill a valuable niche within the photography world.
 

AlanF

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A better definition for -graphy as used in English is:
The English suffix -graphy means a "field of study" or related to "writing" a book, and is an anglicization of the French -graphie inherited from the Latin -graphia, which is a transliterated direct borrowing from Greek.
Collins. Merriam-Webster etc use this definition.

-graphy​


COMBINING FORM IN COUNTABLE NOUN
1.
indicating a form or process of writing, representing, etc
calligraphy
photography
2.
indicating an art or descriptive science
choreography
oceanography
Collins English Dictionary. Copyright © HarperCollins Publishers
Word origin
via Latin from Greek -graphia, from graphein to write
 
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LogicExtremist

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Sep 26, 2021
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I'm not sure what you mean by "stretch"... of course it is photography... what else would you define it to be? Virtually everyone is a photographer now.

The "art of photography" could be something else but it is a nebulous concept at best. If you mean that you have to shoot on manual mode to be a photographer then I wouldn't be most of the time as I use shutter or aperture priority a lot.

Then you bring in "skill in photography" which is a different concept which assumes that you "correctly" (whatever that may mean) adjust the ISO/shutter/aperture/focus to get the final image that you want. Some of my most interesting photos were based on errors in that "skill". I still make mistakes that my camera (thankfully) was able to handle with high ISO when I accidentally pushed my shutter speed to 1/800s underwater yesterday. You don't even mention that post production skills can be equally valuable. I took a very expensive 60 minute private aerial flight in Iceland recently and the abstracts that I created in post brought the images to light (so to speak). The raw images were flat and somewhat boring.

To suggest that a professional photographer would turn their nose up at using a mobile phone is pure snobbishness! They each fulfill a valuable niche within the photography world.
By stretch, I mean being liberal with the term, like how everybody is an 'engineer', as in the janitor is a maintenance engineer these days! :oops:

Remember the big story about who owned the copyright in the case where an ape pressed the shutter button on a photographer's setup and by chance took a selfie? It just pressed the button but that didn't make it a photographer, or the photographer that owned the copyright to the photo as the court finally ruled lol!

The simple way I differentiate the two is by looking at who took the image. In photography, the photographer is the one that takes the photo, through a commination of knowledge, skill and creativity of various degrees, they make the decisions. With a snapshot, just like with the ape's selfie, the camera does everything, the 'shapshooter' just points it in the general direction of the subject or themselves and simple presses the button. Even in an highly restrictive auto mode, a photographer 'controls the light' to conform with the image they have in their mind.

The smartphone takes an image based on an algorithm which averages out a large library of images in that genre plus makes some adjustments according to some rules, and image stacks a series of images to construct a HDR image, then applies the formulaic post processing adjustments to compensate for the limitations of the small sensor, tiny aperture, lack of stabilisation and potential noise in low light, to create the same over-sharpened and oversaturated smartphone photos we all know and love. :)

The professional photographer's response wasn't snobbishness, it was more like 'how can I work with a tool like this, don't expect pro images, this isn't the gear I work with', which is a fair response. Other than good composition, very little was in their control, especially on a phone they've never used before.
 

LogicExtremist

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Sep 26, 2021
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Well, I guess the photon/sensor info is written to memory. ;)
Precisely, in film the image (a representation of the subject using AlanF's description) was 'inscribed' or 'written' to a photosensitive silver-halide emulsion, with modern digital sensors it's encoded in binary form to a NAND flash memory chip. :)
 

EOS 4 Life

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I'm not sure what you mean by "stretch"... of course it is photography... what else would you define it to be? Virtually everyone is a photographer now.
It depends on how photography is defined.
The "to study" definition is what people use when they want to differentiate between a snapshot and a photograph.
At the same time, a snapshot can be taken with a professional camera and a photograph can be taken with a smartphone.
 

Ozarker

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It depends on how photography is defined.
The "to study" definition is what people use when they want to differentiate between a snapshot and a photograph.
At the same time, a snapshot can be taken with a professional camera and a photograph can be taken with a smartphone.
I think that's a little silly. Both are photographs. It doesn't become a photo based on how much thought was put into it. How would we measure that? Who decides? Now, whether it is art or not is up to each individual.
 
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EOS 4 Life

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I think that's a little silly. Both are photographs. It doesn't become a photo based on how much thought was put into it. How would we measure that? Who decides? Now, whether it is art or not is up to each individual.

Every word in the dictionary has multiple definitions.
Photography can be defined as capturing an image and a snapshot is surely that.
Photography can also be defined as a field of study and a snapshot is surely not that.
As to who gets to decide, everyone is entitled to an opinion and everyone is entitled to disagree with the opinion of anyone else.
 

Ozarker

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Every word in the dictionary has multiple definitions.
Photography can be defined as capturing an image and a snapshot is surely that.
Photography can also be defined as a field of study and a snapshot is surely not that.
As to who gets to decide, everyone is entitled to an opinion and everyone is entitled to disagree with the opinion of anyone else.
Well, you were making a comparison between "snapshots" and photos... as though one is not the other. I fail to see what photography art classes or study has to do with it. Studying photography and a photo are two entirely different things :)
 

dolina

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Because these will be used for the 2024 Summer Olympics I expect the following to come out within 22 months

Future RF body or lensCurrent model
EOS R12020 EOS-1D X Mark III
EOS R5 Mark II2020 EOS R5
EOS R6 Mark II2020 EOS R6
RF 200-400mm f/4L IS USM2011 EF 200-400mm f/4L IS USM
RF 200mm f/2L IS USM2008 EF 200mm f/2L IS USM
RF 300mm f/2.8L IS USM2010 EF 300mm f/2.8L IS USM
RF 500mm f/4L IS USM2010 EF 500mm f/4L IS USM

Improvements would be

- less weight
- less physical length
- more IS

Higher price points are to be expected.

2023 should expect

- EOS R Mark II
- EOS RP Mark II
 
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EOS 4 Life

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RF 200-400mm f/4L IS USM2011 EF 200-400mm f/4L IS USM
Canon has a patent for a 200-500

A lot of the patents for the other lenses you mentioned are here:
 
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dolina

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Canon has a patent for a 200-500

A lot of the patents for the other lenses you mentioned are here:
I hope those patents will result in an off the shelf product.
 
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dolina

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Weight difference of the past 25 years of select Canon EF & RF lenses.

Bonus: NIKKOR Z 800mm f/6.3 VR S

I would not be surprised that these RF lenses will be less than 2.2 kilograms when released within 20 months

- RF 500mm f/4.0L IS USM
- RF 300mm f/2.8L IS USM
- RF 200mm f/2.0L IS USM
qZwwIeH.png
 
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neuroanatomist

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Weight difference of the past 25 years of select Canon EF & RF lenses.

Bonus: NIKKOR Z 800mm f/6.3 VR S

I would not be surprised that these RF lenses will be less than 2.2 kilograms when released within 20 months

- RF 500mm f/4.0L IS USM
- RF 300mm f/2.8L IS USM
- RF 200mm f/2.0L IS USM
qZwwIeH.png
It seems like there’s an echo on the forums today.