Video Aliasing Issues
The EOS 5D Mark II, 7D and 1D Mark IV (no word on the T1i) appear to be affected by the issue.

What's the deal?
“The article by Barry Green is about the oft-reported “aliasing” artifacts in video from the Canon HDSLRs (5D Mark II, 7D, 1D Mark IV). Barry does a great job of backing up a few steps and defining the term aliasing.

Aliasing occurs when you sample something infrequently enough that you create an impression of something that wasn’t there. Imagine a blinking light in a room with a door. You must open the door to check the status of the light. If you open the door often enough, you get a pretty good picture of the status of the light, maybe something like on, on on, off off off, on on on, etc. Your samples are frequent enough to accurately represent the light’s activity.”

Read all about it at Planet5D

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“The article by Barry Green is about the oft-reported “aliasing” artifacts in video from the Canon HDSLRs (5D Mark II, 7D, 1D Mark IV). Barry does a great job of backing up a few steps and defining the term aliasing.

Aliasing occurs when you sample something infrequently enough that you create an impression of something that wasn’t there. Imagine a blinking light in a room with a door. You must open the door to check the status of the light. If you open the door often enough, you get a pretty good picture of the status of the light, maybe something like on, on on, off off off, on on on, etc. Your samples are frequent enough to accurately represent the light’s activity.”

14 Comments

  1. @pure, you might want to read the article. Stu over at prolost does a good recap. The aliasing is simply a fact of digital sensors. Digital being photosites separated by some amount of distance.

    http://prolost.com/blog/2009/12/3/you-didnt-believe-me.html
    “So what does this have to do with Canon HDSLRs? The same thing it has to do with every digital camera. Every camera that uses photosites to create pixels has to deal with this venetian blind problem. There’s space between those photosites, and in that space you can miss out on important information about what was happening in front of the lens.”

    So the T1i has the problem as do all video cameras. But their strengths are delivering impressive results with inter-changeable lenses at a (relatively) low pricepoint.

  2. This does impact video that is projected at very large sizes, like on a motion picture screen. of course, people who produce motion pictures have processes to remove it.

    Still, I would expect future generations of cameras to improve.

  3. It might effect it, under certain conditions that most people are not experiencing with the cameras…have to learn the limitations of any camera.

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