As the Photographers--What will we do?

surapon

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Aug 2, 2013
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Dear Friends.
As the Photographers, What will we do, when we see the bad News / Bad Actions in front of us---Shoot the Photos first and Help them , or Forget about Photos and Help Them---Or do Both As Nick UT. Did ??
Thank you, for your Comments and IDEAS of your reactions.
Surapon

Please Click on the Link below.


About A Photograph : Nick Ut on Vimeo
 

fugu82

EOS RP
Mar 3, 2012
200
0
Yes, Humanity trumps Photography. If there is a way to help someone, that would be the priority.
 

mm

I'm New Here
Feb 15, 2013
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Perhaps controversial based on the responses provided so far, but, sometimes taking the picture helps more. I'm not a conflict photographer, nor am I a photojournalist in sensitive situations, but a true calling requires discipline and sacrifice. Again, sometimes taking the photo helps more.

Check out some of Larry Burrows' stuff - "With a brave crew in a deadly fight" or perhaps Kevin Carter's Sudan suff (which I might point out both paid the ultimate sacrifice for themselves).

Bringing awareness CAN be more important than the isolated event. Taking the picture can be the more human choice.

Easy to talk about what to do when I'm sitting behind my computer with a latte.
 

Rienzphotoz

Peace unto all ye Canon, Nikon & Sony shooters
Aug 22, 2012
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The general reaction of normal human beings is to help out first ... I don't think people think about taking photos when we can help (maybe with the exception of some sick/creepy journalists) ... but that being said if there was an aircraft crash, we wold most likely record it, coz we know we cannot do anything about it. But if we see a person hit by a car lying on the road we would call for an ambulance and stand-by till the ambulance comes (this happened to me a couple of years ago when a Qatar Airways staff was hit by a car - I called the ambulance and waited till the ambulance came - unfortunately she passed away).
But there are situations when capturing the event is more important than trying to help out ... the wisdom to know when to help out and when to step back and capture the event, is what makes a great human being ... but I'm just an ordinary human being, my first reaction would be to help out if I can.
 

scottkinfw

Wildlife photography is my passion
I think it is also important to understand your role going into the situation. If you are a "professional photographer" on assignment, you will have a well defined mission with rules of engagement. If you are not given an assignment, or are not paid, you have a different role. Even still, we are all humans first, and we must all act within our own set of values. If our values are crystal clear to begin with, the decision may be hard, but what the right thing to to will be obvious, as our values do not change- just the situation.
 

surapon

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Wow, Wow, Wow-----
THANK you Sir/ Madam for your IDEAS/ Logics and your Thinking in that Mili-Seconds of that Moment and Acts as very difference situations of the Actions in front of Us.
Yes, Sir. We have make decision for the best of our self/ Our Duty and some time Live and Death too.
Surapon
 

ajfotofilmagem

EOS 5D Mark IV
Aug 23, 2013
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Each case is different. A photographer doing war coverage has an important mission as a soldier. Assuming that a soldier has to choose between shoot the enemy (which can kill you) or rescue a victim, he has the duty to shoot the enemy first. If a doctor or nurse is in the same situation in the war (and has a gun) he must first help the victim, and then shoot the enemy that can kill you. Call me insensitive, but a photographer who is on a mission to fulfill its mission in the first place.
 

surapon

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ajfotofilmagem said:
We must also remember the first rule of first responder who is: NO BECOME A VICTIM. ::)
"We must also remember the first rule of first responder who is: NO BECOME A VICTIM."

+ 10 for me too, Thank you, Sir
Surapon
 

surapon

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Sporgon said:
That picture had a big impact on public opinion of the war.

I had no idea Nick Ut had rescued the girl !
Yes, Sir, Dear Mr. Sporgon.
Yes, This Photos is the learning tool/ Yard stick, for all Photojournalistic News Reportor and News Photographers around the world.
Nice to talk to you, Sir, Surapon
 

Zen

EOS 90D
Sep 23, 2012
114
3
Buffalo, NY USA
scottkinfw said:
I think it is also important to understand your role going into the situation. If you are a "professional photographer" on assignment, you will have a well defined mission with rules of engagement. If you are not given an assignment, or are not paid, you have a different role. Even still, we are all humans first, and we must all act within our own set of values. If our values are crystal clear to begin with, the decision may be hard, but what the right thing to to will be obvious, as our values do not change- just the situation.

Seems to me that this is the best answer. But as someone else said, it's easy to sit here in our living room and imagine what we might do . . . when the chips are down.

A very good subject, though.

Good luck to all who may find him or herself in such a circumstance.

Zen
 

surapon

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Zen said:
scottkinfw said:
I think it is also important to understand your role going into the situation. If you are a "professional photographer" on assignment, you will have a well defined mission with rules of engagement. If you are not given an assignment, or are not paid, you have a different role. Even still, we are all humans first, and we must all act within our own set of values. If our values are crystal clear to begin with, the decision may be hard, but what the right thing to to will be obvious, as our values do not change- just the situation.

Seems to me that this is the best answer. But as someone else said, it's easy to sit here in our living room and imagine what we might do . . . when the chips are down.

A very good subject, though.

Good luck to all who may find him or herself in such a circumstance.

Zen
Thaqnks you, Sir, Dear Mr. Zen.
Surapon
 

ablearcher

EOS 90D
Sep 23, 2010
152
0
Canada
If I can do something - I'll just do it. The reason I can never be a photog in a war zone. I will not care if i'm on assignment or paid, etc. Saving a life would always be a priority. I don't need a picture where I was standing and taking care of my framing and ISO while someone needed help. Not worth it for me.
 

surapon

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ablearcher said:
If I can do something - I'll just do it. The reason I can never be a photog in a war zone. I will not care if i'm on assignment or paid, etc. Saving a life would always be a priority. I don't need a picture where I was standing and taking care of my framing and ISO while someone needed help. Not worth it for me.
Yes, Sir, Dear Mr. Ablearcher.
I am agree with you 250%, My life is more important than get Kill in my Duty/ War Zone.
Here is the Photo attached to show that more stupid photographers in this world try to get the best shots with out thinking the safety of their lifes------- Ha, Ha, Ha.
Surapon
 

Attachments

surapon

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mackguyver said:
I'm not sure how many of you have seen this one (Link is to Forbes editorial):
http://www.forbes.com/sites/jeffbercovici/2012/12/04/new-york-posts-subway-death-photo-was-it-ethical/
Thanks you, Sir, Mr. Mackguyver.
You are right " “If you have placed yourself in a situation where you can help, you are morally obligated,” he says. “The proper thing to do would’ve been to put down the camera and try to get the guy out. I can understand why people are upset.”
“Your job as a human being, so to speak, outweighs your job as a photojournalist,” he adds. "


Great Post for all of us = Photographers, Hobby or PRO, To learn and face the Reality, that one day we will face.
Thanks again , Sir.
Surapon
 

privatebydesign

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As mm said, if this subject interests you read about Kevin Carter and his Pulitzer Prize winning Sudan image, that ended up creating a story that has largely been contradicted by other prize winning photographers there at the time.

But the far better tale is the book "The Bang Bang Club: Snapshots from a Hidden War", that follows the workings of four key photographers during the civil unrest during the end of the apartheid era in South Africa. Touches on many similar instances and the photographers feelings about the images they took, and the effect taking those images had on them, and those effects can't be underestimated, Carter killed himself, Ken Oosterbroek was killed while photographing there, Greg Marinovich was shot three times before stepping back from conflict photography and João Silva was very seriously injured in Afghanistan in 2010.

Compulsory reading for those interested.