Black & White

Eldar

EOS R6
Jan 14, 2013
3,250
7
www.flickr.com
zim said:
d
Eldar said:
He he, Edward ... 69 is not THAT old ;)

Early this year I went to Lake Kerkini in northern Greece, where the fantastic dalmatian pelican stays over the winter. This one, looking into the sunset, looks like a bird´s version of Lord Nelson.

beautiful image
I'm in admiration of the tonal ranges in these images. is that down to great processing skill and/or really good exposure? I love b&w but mine always look flat to me even after spending an age on curves and black point adjustments.
I am far away from being an expert on processing, so I have to rely on my ability to expose properly. In post processing of B&W images, I primarily play with contrast, clarity and the black and white sliders. On B&W images, you can go a lot further with those 4 than you can with colour. Occasionally I also adjust the colour sliders, if that is required to separate positive and negative space, or create pop.

Very important though, is to use a good and calibrated monitor. I use an Eizo with built in hardware calibration. What I see on the screen is what comes out on my printer.
 

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zim

EOS 5D Mark IV
CR Pro
Oct 18, 2011
1,947
142
Eldar said:
zim said:
d
Eldar said:
He he, Edward ... 69 is not THAT old ;)

Early this year I went to Lake Kerkini in northern Greece, where the fantastic dalmatian pelican stays over the winter. This one, looking into the sunset, looks like a bird´s version of Lord Nelson.

beautiful image
I'm in admiration of the tonal ranges in these images. is that down to great processing skill and/or really good exposure? I love b&w but mine always look flat to me even after spending an age on curves and black point adjustments.
I am far away from being an expert on processing, so I have to rely on my ability to expose properly. In post processing of B&W images, I primarily play with contrast, clarity and the black and white sliders. On B&W images, you can go a lot further with those 4 than you can with colour. Occasionally I also adjust the colour sliders, if that is required to separate positive and negative space, or create pop.

Very important though, is to use a good and calibrated monitor. I use an Eizo with built in hardware calibration. What I see on the screen is what comes out on my printer.
Thanks for the tips Elder, much appreciated, I think your underestimating your processing skills a little though!
Having an eye for what makes a good b&w subject helps a tonne too, my wish to create a b&w I'm really happy with has been rekindled gonna dig through my stuff :)

cheers
 
P

Pookie

Guest
Eldar said:
He he, Edward ... 69 is not THAT old ;)

Early this year I went to Lake Kerkini in northern Greece, where the fantastic dalmatian pelican stays over the winter. This one, looking into the sunset, looks like a bird´s version of Lord Nelson.
I like this chicken Eldar ;)

I know in the day of the digital no one might ever consider reading Ansel series, especially The Negative. The zone system was primarily meant to give "perfect" negative for printing but can easily be applied to the composition of all BW images. It gives you a great understanding of tonal ranges and placing your scene exposure correctly. Once you understand the basics you see the beauty of it. Here on this forum everyone is so concerned with seeing detail in the shadows that they often forget the necessity of a tonal range. Without contrast from high to low your image will look flat. Don't fear black shadows or great highlights, don't "slide" them into mush... embrace them. I think it's what gives Eldar's image of that Pelican such a beauty.

Early morning breakfast...
Rolleiflex 2.8f
Kodak TMY-2
Rodinal(1+25) 6:00 minutes at 20c

 

Eldar

EOS R6
Jan 14, 2013
3,250
7
www.flickr.com
Glad to see this thread is alive and kicking, with some excellent posts.

This is a Swedish grey wolf, looking at me with curiosity. It soon took off to the left and disappeared.
 

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dpc

EOS-1D X Mark III
Dec 11, 2013
6,042
2,893
Western Canada
Eldar said:
Glad to see this thread is alive and kicking, with some excellent posts.

This is a Swedish grey wolf, looking at me with curiosity. It soon took off to the left and disappeared.

A very nice capture! :)