Canon EOS R5 impressions by a Canon EOS 5Ds shooter

AlanF

Hands. Face. Space.
CR Pro
Aug 16, 2012
7,334
7,114
Not really. You can just underexpose (either of them actually) to the same high ISO setting. 5R however does retains some advantage in Dynamic Range also at high iso settings.
That's correct about high iso range. I've occasionally underexposed at iso 6400 and pushed through 2 or more stops with good results as high iso is in the "iso independent" region. However, that won't work as well for the 5DS at low iso as the DR flattens out with iso in the 100 region.
 

masterpix

EOS RP
Jun 29, 2016
232
160
Not really. You can just underexpose (either of them actually) to the same high ISO setting. 5R however does retains some advantage in Dynamic Range also at high iso settings.
I somehwat dissagree: the 5Ds (not the 5D) Iso is: 100–6400; Expanded: 50–12,800 while the R5 ISO range of 100-51200 Expaneed 50 - 102400
 

AlanF

Hands. Face. Space.
CR Pro
Aug 16, 2012
7,334
7,114
I somehwat dissagree: the 5Ds (not the 5D) Iso is: 100–6400; Expanded: 50–12,800 while the R5 ISO range of 100-51200 Expaneed 50 - 102400
Don't fall for that marketing iso trick. This is what Bryan from TDP writes:

"The marketing department is always quick to state a camera's ISO range, but reality is that the usable settings within that range are what really matter. I immediately dismiss the highest stops as having a too-low SNR (Signal-to-Noise Ratio)"
"As the ISO setting increases from 100 through 800, noise levels grow. But, they remain very low, as usual, showing the impressive capabilities of a modern, high-resolution full-frame imaging sensor. At ISO 1600 through ISO 3200, noise levels become noticeable though images still look very good at these settings. By ISO 6400, images begin to show noticeable impact from noise, and by ISO 12800, noise is strong. ISO 25600 through 51200 results look bad unless downsized significantly, and ISO 102400 results are terrible, seemingly good enough for only marketing purposes. "


There's not much difference between my R5 and 5DSR in the iso ranges where I work (320 - 6400).
 
  • Like
Reactions: tron

Sporgon

5% of gear used 95% of the time
CR Pro
I have never ever needed to clean a sensor, and I am changing lenses, putting on and taking off TCs constantly, inside and outdoors. What am I doing wrong?
Exactly. I'm the same, and I use pretty well primes all the time and 'am constantly changing them ! I did have to get the sensors on my original 5D's (not 5DS !!) cleaned occasionally as they got so there were more dust spots than pixels, but now, with the latest in-built ultrasonic cleaning I just don't worry about it.

However in our case it may be something to do with our climate here in the U.K. and Europe. To be fair I've seen some pretty heavily dust contaminated sensors from the dry and arid parts of the 'States.
 

Fischer

EOS M6 Mark II
Mar 17, 2020
82
47
I somehwat dissagree: the 5Ds (not the 5D) Iso is: 100–6400; Expanded: 50–12,800 while the R5 ISO range of 100-51200 Expaneed 50 - 102400
Think you do not understand how high iso works on digital cameras. The sensor is iso invariant from around 800 iso on most sensors. So if you underexpose from there its just like cranking up the iso setting. No iso dail needed.
 
  • Like
Reactions: AlanF

melgross

EOS RP
Nov 2, 2016
626
411
Think you do not understand how high iso works on digital cameras. The sensor is iso invariant from around 800 iso on most sensors. So if you underexpose from there its just like cranking up the iso setting. No iso dail needed.
The problem is that the Canon sensors weren’t very invariant. They would show large differences. The new sensors are much better.
 

AlanF

Hands. Face. Space.
CR Pro
Aug 16, 2012
7,334
7,114
The problem is that the Canon sensors weren’t very invariant. They would show large differences. The new sensors are much better.
Fischer is correct that they tend to be iso invariant at greater than 800, which is where noise is dominated by the statistics of photon flux. The older Canon sensors were not so good at low iso where they failed to suppress the electrical noise where the photon noise is low.
 

Del Paso

M3 Singlestroke
Aug 9, 2018
931
945
In 6 years using 5D II & IV, I did not even have a speck of dust on a sensor, despite frequent lens changes.
But my Leica is a different story, dust every now and then, but never any wet cleaning.
I thank you all for your answers, the 5 Dsr is on my "buy list" now!
 
  • Like
Reactions: FramerMCB

Sporgon

5% of gear used 95% of the time
CR Pro
I think EOS 5R's DR is quite a big advantage over 5DsR but if you are happy with what you have from 5SsR then it isn't an advantage.
Without wanting to start a DR debate, the 5DS/SR 's low ISO dynamic range, or to put it in practical terms, shadow raising ability, is closer to the "new" Canon on-chip ADC sensors than it is to the older 5DII / III / 6D / II etc.
 

Joules

EOS R
CR Pro
Jul 16, 2017
1,224
1,383
Hamburg, Germany
Without wanting to start a DR debate, the 5DS/SR 's low ISO dynamic range, or to put it in practical terms, shadow raising ability, is closer to the "new" Canon on-chip ADC sensors than it is to the older 5DII / III / 6D / II etc.
It is definitely a good bit behind the 5D IV and a lot behind the R5 in terms of measured DR:


I don't know about fixed pattern noise and banding, but the latter can even be found on the 5D IV when pushed to the absolute extremes and is were the 90D, M6 II, 1DX III, R6 and R5 sensors really show that they are from a different generation.
 

Sporgon

5% of gear used 95% of the time
CR Pro
It is definitely a good bit behind the 5D IV and a lot behind the R5 in terms of measured DR:


I don't know about fixed pattern noise and banding, but the latter can even be found on the 5D IV when pushed to the absolute extremes and is were the 90D, M6 II, 1DX III, R6 and R5 sensors really show that they are from a different generation.
If you want to push to those extremes always update to the very latest tech you can get your hands on.

Somewhere in Keith’s review he has an example of what that “a lot behind” really means.
 

ozturert

EOS 90D
Jan 16, 2019
135
105
Without wanting to start a DR debate, the 5DS/SR 's low ISO dynamic range, or to put it in practical terms, shadow raising ability, is closer to the "new" Canon on-chip ADC sensors than it is to the older 5DII / III / 6D / II etc.
I agree that 5Ds's ADC is better than the others but even 5D Mark IV has a noticeable advantage in terms of DR compared to 5Ds series. I compared them myself. 5D IV has noticeably cleaner shadows. I assume R5 has even better DR.
But again, I was not too unhappy with 5Ds when I had it. As long as I don't open shadows by more than 2-3 stops, things were fine at base ISO. Definitely better than 6D and 5D II.
 

AaronT

EOS RP
CR Pro
Jan 5, 2013
261
554
In 6 years using 5D II & IV, I did not even have a speck of dust on a sensor, despite frequent lens changes.
But my Leica is a different story, dust every now and then, but never any wet cleaning.
I thank you all for your answers, the 5 Dsr is on my "buy list" now!
I have had my 5 Dsr for about 3 and a half years and no dust. My original classic 5D was a dust magnet, my 5DII just a bit. Have no fear.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Del Paso

gregster

I'm New Here
Jan 25, 2018
17
35
Visit site
The EVF does offer what you see is what you get DOF...DSLR's optical VF are DOF limited to f4 (due to the microlenses on the viewfinder screen).
Can this actually be done with the R5? It seems to function wide open and only displays DOF when pressing the DOF preview button. And then when pressed one can't actually change focus, which is extremely frustrating for fine tuning focus for something like a landscape using the minimum aperture.
 

masterpix

EOS RP
Jun 29, 2016
232
160
Think you do not understand how high iso works on digital cameras. The sensor is iso invariant from around 800 iso on most sensors. So if you underexpose from there its just like cranking up the iso setting. No iso dail needed.
The sensor have pixels, each collect as many photons during the time in which the picture is taken, the number/concentration of colelcted photons are converted to electric signal and that is amplified by another circuit to generate the "image" as we see it. While the amount of photones and the conversion into electic siglan is fixed, the amlification is not (as well as the amplificaion noise reduction). But you need to do all this within a limited time (the processor), so if you take the same sensor, the better the processos, the faster you can collect the iamge and more noise reduction algorithms can be used which relates in "higher ISO".
 

AlanF

Hands. Face. Space.
CR Pro
Aug 16, 2012
7,334
7,114
Using DSLRs maybe? :D
One very neat feature that Canon introduced with the R is the shutter that guards the sensor when the camera is turned off. I've been very careful in turning off the R5 when changing lenses.
 
  • Like
Reactions: tron

melgross

EOS RP
Nov 2, 2016
626
411
Fischer is correct that they tend to be iso invariant at greater than 800, which is where noise is dominated by the statistics of photon flux. The older Canon sensors were not so good at low iso where they failed to suppress the electrical noise where the photon noise is low.
My experience that they weren’t invariant at 800 either. They couldn’t hold much shadow.