Canon EOS R5 impressions by a Canon EOS 5Ds shooter

tron

EOS R5
CR Pro
Nov 8, 2011
4,732
971
One very neat feature that Canon introduced with the R is the shutter that guards the sensor when the camera is turned off. I've been very careful in turning off the R5 when changing lenses.
I agree! I am doing it anyway most of the time (if not all) when I change lenses in DSLRs too, so it is a habit. This is an important advantage of EOS R over EOS RP in my opinion (in addition to the better sensor, the top LCD and the battery).
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: Jack Douglas

AlanF

Hands. Face. Space.
CR Pro
Aug 16, 2012
7,334
7,114
My experience that they weren’t invariant at 800 either. They couldn’t hold much shadow.
Photonstophotos have the measurements of DR versus iso, which corresponds to what we are talking about.

You can see that the 5DIV, 5DSR and 5DIII are all getting close to linear, ie iso invariant, above iso 800. The newer 5DIV wins at the lower iso, being relatively invariant down to iso 200. You can also look at the plots of the Photodynamic range shadow improvement chart for these and the slopes for the range 800-12800 iso are ~ parallel for the 5DSR and 5DIV showing that the newer and 5DSR sensors "hold as much shadow".

Screenshot 2020-10-01 at 17.25.31.png
 

snappy604

EOS RP
CR Pro
Jan 25, 2017
439
301
Thanks for telling us this, and no disrespects intended in any way to you whatsoever, but I, for one, have found that the average CR member's thoughts are more reliable than those of Tony and Chelsea.
no disrespect taken. They are trying to make a living from this after all. But nice to see now that everyone's come to terms that it's not a video camera, people are figuring out it has improved things a fair bit.
 

TAF

EOS RP
CR Pro
Feb 26, 2012
414
107
Very nice presentation. I look forward to upgrading from the 5D3 to the R5.

I note his observation that the R5 is thinner than the 5Ds. Perhaps if they had kept the same body thickness as the 5D series, they could have found room for enough heatsink to avoid the issues we've read about...

Oh well; perhaps the R5 MkII will correct that.
 

melgross

EOS RP
Nov 2, 2016
626
411
Photonstophotos have the measurements of DR versus iso, which corresponds to what we are talking about.

You can see that the 5DIV, 5DSR and 5DIII are all getting close to linear, ie iso invariant, above iso 800. The newer 5DIV wins at the lower iso, being relatively invariant down to iso 200. You can also look at the plots of the Photodynamic range shadow improvement chart for these and the slopes for the range 800-12800 iso are ~ parallel for the 5DSR and 5DIV showing that the newer and 5DSR sensors "hold as much shadow".

View attachment 193068
These charts aren’t as helpful, or accurate as people assume. Going by my own testing, I disagree.
 

AlanF

Hands. Face. Space.
CR Pro
Aug 16, 2012
7,334
7,114
I admire your patience. (y)
There are lots of good articles on iso invariance eg https://photographylife.com/iso-invariance-explained and sites like DPR have been pushing it for years. If you know that your sensor is in an iso invariant region, then you don’t worry about underexposing In RAW because you can increase the exposure post processing with no loss of IQ. It‘s very useful in nature photography because you can avoid bleaching highlights. For much of the time I use manual and underexpose deliberately or simply know I don’t have to worry about underexposure. You and many others here know that, and it’s useful information to share.
 
  • Like
Reactions: AaronT and Jethro

Jack Douglas

CR for the Humour
Apr 10, 2013
6,670
2,062
Alberta, Canada
I don't worry about any of it and somehow seem to muddle along; the magic of modern technology. The average viewer doesn't seem to notice the difference, based on the comments I receive. Of course I'm not advocating for deliberate ignorance/carelessness but ... ;)

Sometimes too little attention is paid to composition when it comes to viewer appreciation and striking photos and for me personally that's where I must improve the most, as opposed to getting perfect exposure and other technical things. I envy those who have a great artistic eye. I don't think I have ever perfectly exposed a photo since arriving on the scene with my first DSLR. How's that for airing dirty laundry?:)

Jack
 

keithcooper

EOS RP
CR Pro
I don't worry about any of it and somehow seem to muddle along; the magic of modern technology. The average viewer doesn't seem to notice the difference, based on the comments I receive. Of course I'm not advocating for deliberate ignorance/carelessness but ... ;)

Sometimes too little attention is paid to composition when it comes to viewer appreciation and striking photos and for me personally that's where I must improve the most, as opposed to getting perfect exposure and other technical things. I envy those who have a great artistic eye. I don't think I have ever perfectly exposed a photo since arriving on the scene with my first DSLR. How's that for airing dirty laundry?:)

Jack
Very true - the more I test printers and cameras the more I realise that the technical capabilities have long since passed the photographic abilities of many people using them (myself included sometimes ;-)

This entire site* is bolstered by the widely held (even if rarely admitted) belief that a new camera/lens/printer/paper/ink will improve your photography, and all too often as a way of ignoring the fundamental issues of getting round to taking 'better' photos in the first place. New kit can encourage you to expand and explore your photography, or it's 'failings' provide an excuse as to why the next model is what is really needed ;-)

*yes, I am aware that my own site depends on this to some extent as well ;-) I'm lucky enough to get all this kit to experiment with and explore the technical, so I can't really complain too much, it's helped my own work no end ;-)
 

Fischer

EOS M6 Mark II
Mar 17, 2020
82
47
This entire site* is bolstered by the widely held (even if rarely admitted) belief that a new camera/lens/printer/paper/ink will improve your photography, and all too often as a way of ignoring the fundamental issues of getting round to taking 'better' photos in the first place. New kit can encourage you to expand and explore your photography, or it's 'failings' provide an excuse as to why the next model is what is really needed ;-)
I am no fan of this kind of attitude towards those who want better tools to work with.

So it does nothing for people's photography to get a true wide-angle lens or a 400mm lens or simply a fast prime lens in stead of a standard zoom? Of course it does. Look at your own work. Better gear opens for new photographic opportunities, visual expressions and allows for new subject perspectives and choices.

Think most people looking for better camera equipment are hoping it will enable them to realize more of the photographic ideas they have - rather than improving their photographic ideas.

Also, getting new equipment motivates many people to try out new stuff and shoot more - testing the limits and new options of their new gear - an excellent thing in itself.

I got along very well with a range finder, guessing the distance and having to set the light manually. However, better Camera and lens options are working together to allow me to take a much, much wider range of pictures and subjects today and esspecially using natural light in a way impossible back then.
 
  • Like
Reactions: AlanF

keithcooper

EOS RP
CR Pro
I am no fan of this kind of attitude towards those who want better tools to work with.

So it does nothing for people's photography to get a true wide-angle lens or a 400mm lens or simply a fast prime lens in stead of a standard zoom? Of course it does. Look at your own work. Better gear opens for new photographic opportunities, visual expressions and allows for new subject perspectives and choices.

Think most people looking for better camera equipment are hoping it will enable them to realize more of the photographic ideas they have - rather than improving their photographic ideas.

Also, getting new equipment motivates many people to try out new stuff and shoot more - testing the limits and new options of their new gear - an excellent thing in itself.

I got along very well with a range finder, guessing the distance and having to set the light manually. However, better Camera and lens options are working together to allow me to take a much, much wider range of pictures and subjects today and esspecially using natural light in a way impossible back then.
That's not really all I said is it?

You perhaps gloss over my mention of:
"New kit can encourage you to expand and explore your photography, or it's 'failings' provide an excuse as to why the next model is what is really needed ;-)"

I would be the last to say new kit is a waste of time...
 
  • Like
Reactions: stevelee

AlanF

Hands. Face. Space.
CR Pro
Aug 16, 2012
7,334
7,114
What better gear can do is to expand what you can do. For my interests, a longer and/or sharper lens enables me to take shots of birds that are further away, as does a higher resolution sensor. Reliable eyeAF means I can quickly focus on a bird or a animal that is surrounded by focus-distracting branches. Fast focus acquisition and reliable tracking makes it easier to capture birds and insects in flight. I have had a great time in the past with my gear and taken tens of thousands of images that are very satisfying for me. And, with each generation of lens and camera, I have been able to do a bit more. I just wish I could go back in time with some of my current gear and retake some shots.
 

Jack Douglas

CR for the Humour
Apr 10, 2013
6,670
2,062
Alberta, Canada
What better gear can do is to expand what you can do. For my interests, a longer and/or sharper lens enables me to take shots of birds that are further away, as does a higher resolution sensor. Reliable eyeAF means I can quickly focus on a bird or a animal that is surrounded by focus-distracting branches. Fast focus acquisition and reliable tracking makes it easier to capture birds and insects in flight. I have had a great time in the past with my gear and taken tens of thousands of images that are very satisfying for me. And, with each generation of lens and camera, I have been able to do a bit more. I just wish I could go back in time with some of my current gear and retake some shots.
WOW, that's not Keith's or my point. Everyone knows that the best scientific photos will come from the best scientific gear. Some bird photos will be artistically appealing to non bird lovers and others will be fantastically sharp and technically perfect and really appealing mainly to bird lovers and of little interest to non-bird lovers.
All things being equal, better gear contributes to better photos a little or a lot it all depends. I often see photos that blow me away and then expecting to see the gear is top notch I find it isn't. I want the R5 for precisely the same reasons you do and I am sure there will be some improvement in my photos at least technically and due to the enthusiasm factor maybe aesthetically too. However, it remains a challenge for me to produce really compelling photos.

And, for me and most folk, we are not interested in defining the views of others. This is just my opinion.

Jack
 

AlanF

Hands. Face. Space.
CR Pro
Aug 16, 2012
7,334
7,114
WOW, that's not Keith's or my point. Everyone knows that the best scientific photos will come from the best scientific gear. Some bird photos will be artistically appealing to non bird lovers and others will be fantastically sharp and technically perfect and really appealing mainly to bird lovers and of little interest to non-bird lovers.
All things being equal, better gear contributes to better photos a little or a lot it all depends. I often see photos that blow me away and then expecting to see the gear is top notch I find it isn't. I want the R5 for precisely the same reasons you do and I am sure there will be some improvement in my photos at least technically and due to the enthusiasm factor maybe aesthetically too. However, it remains a challenge for me to produce really compelling photos.

And, for me and most folk, we are not interested in defining the views of others. This is just my opinion.

Jack
I am not arguing with yours or Keith's point - if I were, I would do it as a reply to yours or his post, not as a new post. I am simply stating that what more advanced equipment does is to expand the range of what you can do with it. What we do is to work within the constraints of our equipment, and if our equipment has fewer constraints then we can attempt more, be it artistic or scientific.
 

Jack Douglas

CR for the Humour
Apr 10, 2013
6,670
2,062
Alberta, Canada
I am not arguing with yours or Keith's point - if I were, I would do it as a reply to yours or his post, not as a new post. I am simply stating that what more advanced equipment does is to expand the range of what you can do with it. What we do is to work within the constraints of our equipment, and if our equipment has fewer constraints then we can attempt more, be it artistic or scientific.
Of course and I couldn't agree more.

Jack
 

Joules

EOS R
CR Pro
Jul 16, 2017
1,224
1,383
Hamburg, Germany
However, it remains a challenge for me to produce really compelling photos.
I think this new type of gear may prove to provide a greater improvement in the process of capturing images, rather than the results. Especially with birds, there is often not much one can do to take control of the situation, perspective or composition when the action is happening. Ofcourse experience, preparation, technique and not least of all luck play a part. Those are the skills one can hone. The actual proces of taking the picture though is something that I can see being greatly improved with the AF and other advancements the latest generation of cameras provide. I can imagine not just getting more keepers from a purely technical aspect (blurry du to slow AF, bad wing position due to too few FPS) but also getting less frustrating moments were the intent was not properly carried out by the camera, be it due to user error or an actual limitation of the equipment.

As a tech enthusiast, I am just saying that I absolutely agree that you do not need the latest and greatest and should not expect it to improve your results if there are other aspects about your shooting you can work on. But it also is not like there aren't things one can appreciate about new tech even if they often don't directly contribute to the end results in a significant way.