ReImagine: Canon EOS R5 and Canon EOS R6 live stream announced

FrenchFry

Wildlife enthusiast!
Jun 14, 2020
67
47
For anyone who wants to choose between watching the Canon USA or the Canon Europe videos, I personally found that the Canon Europe one was leaps and bounds better. I wish I watched that one first and didn't bother with the USA one.
 

Michael Clark

Now we see through a glass, darkly...
Apr 5, 2016
2,937
1,689
It appears as though 90% of Americans don't realize what the S stands for and will happily continue to use it during Daylight Saving time months. Or if they think about it, they do realize it means "standard" but imagine "standard" is just "what everyone in the time zone is using as their standard today" (I.e., that it means "non daylight saving time")

I suggest to people who don't want to have to update their business hours on their websites every time the clock is reset, to just use "ET," "CT," etc. That doesn't help the folks in Arizona, for whom "MT" means, effectively, "PT" more than half of the year; they really should spell out "Mountain Standard Time."

(Note for Europeans who might be scratching their heads: Apparently on your continent the "S" stands for "Summer" (what we Yanks call "Daylight"), so it actually has the opposite meaning here than it does for you. So CEST is summer time, CET is winter time in Central Europe, here EDT is summer time, EST is winter time on our east coast.)
Or they could have just posted the time in GMT/UTC format and let everyone figure it out much more easily...
 

SteveC

R5
Sep 3, 2019
1,205
972
Or they could have just posted the time in GMT/UTC format and let everyone figure it out much more easily...
No, that'd solve nothing (even aside from the problem that it would be more difficult for people than doing the sign right). If my business opens at 9 AM Mountain time, I still have tgo change my signs from 4PM UTC (in winter) to 3PM UTC (in summer). Just saying 9 AM MT is easy for everyone. I never have to change my sign., and people don't have to remember (assuming they even know in the first place) how to get from UTC to whatever time is on their watch.

Arizona businesses apparently just put a notice on their website that they don't observe DST. But even so, I'd be willing to bet a significant percentage of their out of state customers correct in the wrong direction, trying to get hold of them at 8AM AZ time thinking it's 10 AM there when it's 9AM in Denver.

China has ONE time zone; the country's east-west extent is broad enough for three time zones. Apparently they though things would be easier that way if everyone was on the same clock, buit it doesn't work out that way at all. People in Western China simply start work at 11 AM instead of 9AM on their clocks, since it's still midmorning at 11 there, so any communications still has to deal with a two hour discrepancy; it just doesn't appear on clocks. (And China's one time zone, which it shares with Central Indonesia, is by far the most populous time zone in the world. That would be true even if China went to three time zones, as the vast majority of its population is in the eastern part of the country.)
 

stevelee

FT-QL
Jul 6, 2017
1,611
513
Davidson, NC
Just post everything in Newfoundland Daylight Time year round.

I did a test web page that no matter where you are on earth, it will give you the solar time at my house. I thought about implementing it on a clock face on my home page, but never got around to it. Right now it is 12:03pm here.
 

SteveC

R5
Sep 3, 2019
1,205
972
Just post everything in Newfoundland Daylight Time year round.

I did a test web page that no matter where you are on earth, it will give you the solar time at my house. I thought about implementing it on a clock face on my home page, but never got around to it. Right now it is 12:03pm here.
Just to be clear, actual solar time (sun crosses the meridian at noon, but days are not of uniform length--this is what a sundial will show) or mean solar time (sun crosses the meridian at noon on average)? The latter is straightforward to get to from whatever-time-zone-you-are-in's time provided only that you know what longitude you are at. Getting to the former requires the equation of time and/or an analemma chart.
 

stevelee

FT-QL
Jul 6, 2017
1,611
513
Davidson, NC
Just to be clear, actual solar time (sun crosses the meridian at noon, but days are not of uniform length--this is what a sundial will show) or mean solar time (sun crosses the meridian at noon on average)? The latter is straightforward to get to from whatever-time-zone-you-are-in's time provided only that you know what longitude you are at. Getting to the former requires the equation of time and/or an analemma chart.
Yes, my PHP code interpolates an approximation of the equation of time. The file name on the server is “eot.php” as I recall. It gets UTC from the server, adjusts for the longitude of my house, and adjusts for the equation of time at the moment. I think it is generally accurate within a few seconds. So it is a 24-hour sundial, just easier to read more accurately. “Mean solar time” is no fun. Bu5 I don’t need to use it, since I have an app on my phone and Apple Watch that gives current solar time.

Back before I gave up on my lawn mower and hired a yard guy, I took sun time into account when considering when to do yard work. The day we change back to standard time is usually the day here when sun time and clock time get the closest, about six minutes apart. Right now, as I said, it is about an hour and a half.

When I got back from Italy in the fall, after going back and forth between time zones and into standard time, I decided to leave the Roman shades up in my bedroom to help me readjust to EST. There are three large windows facing north with woods not that many feet away, so a glorious view in the fall anyway. I have left them open, and now with nothing scheduled, I find myself operating more or less by the sun more than the clock.
 

SteveC

R5
Sep 3, 2019
1,205
972
Yes, my PHP code interpolates an approximation of the equation of time. The file name on the server is “eot.php” as I recall. It gets UTC from the server, adjusts for the longitude of my house, and adjusts for the equation of time at the moment. I think it is generally accurate within a few seconds. So it is a 24-hour sundial, just easier to read more accurately. “Mean solar time” is no fun. Bu5 I don’t need to use it, since I have an app on my phone and Apple Watch that gives current solar time.

Back before I gave up on my lawn mower and hired a yard guy, I took sun time into account when considering when to do yard work. The day we change back to standard time is usually the day here when sun time and clock time get the closest, about six minutes apart. Right now, as I said, it is about an hour and a half.

When I got back from Italy in the fall, after going back and forth between time zones and into standard time, I decided to leave the Roman shades up in my bedroom to help me readjust to EST. There are three large windows facing north with woods not that many feet away, so a glorious view in the fall anyway. I have left them open, and now with nothing scheduled, I find myself operating more or less by the sun more than the clock.
I'm lucky enough to be only a degree of longitude off from the central meridian of my time zone (105 W). So I rarely have to consider that; my local mean solar time is only about 4 minutes off from the clock. But many people even in the United States (let alone China) will be over half an hour ahead of their mean solar time if they look at their wall clock, since time zone boundaries tend to migrate to the wast of the 7.5 degree lines. And of course Alaska is just flat out set an hour later than it should be, even when not doing DST; they basically have built-in DST year round and go to double DST in the summer, at least when looking at the sun's position.

My strategy on my last trip to Europe, where I had to suck up an 8 or 9 hour time difference (Mountain time to Central European and even Turkish time), was to spend five weeks progressively setting my alarm clock 12 minutes earlier every day. That got me gradually on London time. Fortunately I live alone. (The trip was timed so that I got to experience of changing to standard time twice at the end, as it was in October and Europe switches back earlier than we do.)

The people who have it worst? Mission control for any of the Mars rovers. Because those craft are solar powered, they can only operate in day time, and Mars has a 24 1/2 hour day. So every day their shift moves half an hour later (relative to our day). In twelve days, their schedule has completely turned upside down, but only twelve days later it's back to something normal.
 
  • Like
Reactions: stevelee