The Canon EOS R3 will eliminate “Lag” and “Blackout” for stills shooters

neuroanatomist

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The real point I think is that Canon needs to invest in tech to reduce the EVF activation time to near-zero,
Perhaps they have. The issue to date may be more than just time to activate the EVF, it may also be time to get the readout coming off the sensor. If the architecture of the R3's sensor makes that faster, the EVF activation lag may be reduced or eliminated. I hope that's the case for the R3. We'll find out, at some point (hopefully soon).
 
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tapanit

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Jul 17, 2012
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Appreciate your comment, and your dragonfly photography is fabulous. But the method you describe is only really feasible if you use back button focus. Unfortunately at 70 my coordination is no longer good enough to use that method.

If the AF is activated normally (by half press of the shutter button), the camera will start focusing *before* I get the camera to my eye, and that means it might be hunting like crazy searching for a bird that isn't yet even in the frame. The best workaround I've found, for my own style of shooting, is to momentarily tap the preview button to activate the EVF (but not the AF), before I raise the camera.

The real point I think is that Canon needs to invest in tech to reduce the EVF activation time to near-zero, and to introduce a simple firmware update that will enable users to keep the EVF active for more than 4 seconds after the eye is removed from the eyepiece - if I'm hand holding a 100-400mm or heavier lens, my arms need a rest occasionally, and I don't want to have to keep tapping a button to keep the camera awake if I remove it from my eye for a few seconds.
I should think it'd be easy enough to use a motion detector to use the movement of the camera up to activate the EVF, without waiting for any buttons to be pressed. The motion of lifting the camera up should be distinct enough that it could avoid being activated during transport &c.

Canon, if you're reading this: I haven't patented the idea. :)
 
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john1970

EOS R5
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Dec 27, 2015
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I should think it'd be easy enough to use a motion detector to use the movement of the camera up to activate the EVF, without waiting for any buttons to be pressed. The motion of lifting the camera up should be distinct enough that it could avoid being activated during transport &c.

Canon, if you're reading this: I haven't patented the idea. :)
A great idea!
 
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entoman

wildlife photography
May 8, 2015
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Perhaps they have. The issue to date may be more than just time to activate the EVF, it may also be time to get the readout coming off the sensor. If the architecture of the R3's sensor makes that faster, the EVF activation lag may be reduced or eliminated. I hope that's the case for the R3. We'll find out, at some point (hopefully soon).
It would be nice to think that is the case, let's hope so.

I haven't noticed any Canon patents relating to using a motion sensor to activate the EVF, but tapanit's suggestion amounts to a very sensible and practical potential solution that Canon and some other MILC brands would be wise to investigate.
 

jam05

R5, C70
Mar 12, 2019
654
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I don't understand why Canon would put an SD card slot in a camera like the R3. It would make more sense to provide two Cfexpress slots and anyone who can afford the camera will certainly be able to afford the more expensive type of memory cards.. A camera "built for speed" should have the fastest available memory cards and nothing less.
I have a feeling that the R3 will essentially be the "mirrorless 1DX Mark III", inheriting that camera's "pro sports shooter" role. Further, I bet the R1 is in the works and will be Canon's "megapixel monster", likely with between 75 and 85MP.
It's going to be interesting to see what happens.... And potentially really hard on my credit cards!
Because SDexpress will be faster than many CF cards
 
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unfocused

EOS-1D X Mark III
Jul 20, 2010
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This is a big deal for me. Athletes always want a portrait where they are looking at the camera while tossing the ball into the air with the ball frozen In mid-air. With a DSLR it’s a pretty easy shot. With the R it’s ridiculously difficult to time and with the R5 it’s only marginally better. Hoping it will be fixed in the R3.
 
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AlanF

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Aug 16, 2012
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Appreciate your comment, and your dragonfly photography is fabulous. But the method you describe is only really feasible if you use back button focus. Unfortunately at 70 my coordination is no longer good enough to use that method.

If the AF is activated normally (by half press of the shutter button), the camera will start focusing *before* I get the camera to my eye, and that means it might be hunting like crazy searching for a bird that isn't yet even in the frame. The best workaround I've found, for my own style of shooting, is to momentarily tap the preview button to activate the EVF (but not the AF), before I raise the camera.

The real point I think is that Canon needs to invest in tech to reduce the EVF activation time to near-zero, and to introduce a simple firmware update that will enable users to keep the EVF active for more than 4 seconds after the eye is removed from the eyepiece - if I'm hand holding a 100-400mm or heavier lens, my arms need a rest occasionally, and I don't want to have to keep tapping a button to keep the camera awake if I remove it from my eye for a few seconds.
I wish I was 70 again - youth is wasted on the young! I've been using back-button focus for many years, now with two buttons for two different modes, and it's second nature. I don't know of course your particular circumstances but perhaps some practice sessions might get you going. Thanks for the comments about my dragonflies.
 
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neuroanatomist

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Jul 21, 2010
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It would be nice to think that is the case, let's hope so.

I haven't noticed any Canon patents relating to using a motion sensor to activate the EVF, but tapanit's suggestion amounts to a very sensible and practical potential solution that Canon and some other MILC brands would be wise to investigate.
Agreed. Since there are already gyroscopic sensors to detect camera motion (for which IBIS compensates), it should be relatively easy to implement. Fitness watches can determine pattetns of motion associated with various types of exercise, or with a fall, so similarly programming detection of the camera raise motion should be quite feasible.
 
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entoman

wildlife photography
May 8, 2015
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This is a big deal for me. Athletes always want a portrait where they are looking at the camera while tossing the ball into the air with the ball frozen In mid-air. With a DSLR it’s a pretty easy shot. With the R it’s ridiculously difficult to time and with the R5 it’s only marginally better. Hoping it will be fixed in the R3.
If Canon had created a "5DMk5" using the 45MP sensor from the R5, and worked a bit harder to reduce the noise and vibration of the mirror/shutter assembly, I would have chosen it instead of the R5.

Mirrorless cameras have many advantages over DSLRs, but for wildlife photography I still rate DSLRs as more suitable.

But, having said that, I know several BIF photographers who get stunning results from the R5, so I'm the first to admit that my photography is more limited by my own abilities than by the equipment I use...
 
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Sep 5, 2018
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Because SDexpress will be faster than many CF cards

CF Express can be faster or equal in speed to SD Express. SD Express isn’t magically going to work on the current slots at full speed, in fact it is going to run at UHS-I speeds maximum on older cameras. So right now the R3 has a crippled SD reader that will get worse if you use SD Express.

As for why there isn’t a second slot it is most likely they ran out of PCIe lanes as you can run SD on a potato with the GPS if it has one and dedicate the fast lanes to Ethernet, WiFi, and the main card.
 
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privatebydesign

I post too Much on Here!!
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Jan 29, 2011
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I don't understand why Canon would put an SD card slot in a camera like the R3. It would make more sense to provide two Cfexpress slots and anyone who can afford the camera will certainly be able to afford the more expensive type of memory cards.. A camera "built for speed" should have the fastest available memory cards and nothing less.
For me personally, a fast card and a ubiquitous card combination are what I need most. I‘d shoot RAW to the fast card and jpegs to the SD card and I know I can give the SD card to pretty much anybody with a laptop or tablet and they can use those images quickly for social media etc.

It’s not about the cost of the cards for me, it about the utility of them, anybody tasked with dealing with social media posts knows about and has access to an SD card reader.
 
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RayValdez360

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Jun 6, 2012
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It's definitely better on the R5, but some sports shooters that I have spoken to don't think it's good enough, especially the lag. Most just say that it feels "off".
I am not a sports shooter so i didnt really notice it on the R5 but the R was terrible for any fast paced continuous shooting.
 
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snappy604

EOS RP
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Jan 25, 2017
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I haven't found the lag a big problem for wildlife, but the "wake/startup" time you reference is an issue. I shoot with a grip which extends the shooting time but keeping the camera awake stilll burns through batteries. I usually carry 6 LP-E6H batteries in the field and don't usually have an issue with a day of shooting. I bought a couple of the Jupio dual chargers that I use instead of the single Canon charger. Works for me, but you have to anticipate motion and make sure your camera is awake when needed.
so much this. the wake up is a bit slower and keeping it active chews batteries fairly fast, but having said that.. I end up with too many keepers almost.. insane # of shots I kind of get overwhelmed with editing. It's forcing me to re-think my process.
 
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AlanF

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I should think it'd be easy enough to use a motion detector to use the movement of the camera up to activate the EVF, without waiting for any buttons to be pressed. The motion of lifting the camera up should be distinct enough that it could avoid being activated during transport &c.

Canon, if you're reading this: I haven't patented the idea. :)
It would be coming on all the time when you are walking around with the camera just like the continuous AF mode that operates when you are not half-pressing the shutter and drains the battery.
 

entoman

wildlife photography
May 8, 2015
989
1,165
UK
It would be coming on all the time when you are walking around with the camera just like the continuous AF mode that operates when you are not half-pressing the shutter and drains the battery.

Obviously it's not a simple thing to produce an algorithm that expressly recognises the action of quickly raising a camera vertically, and is be able to differentiate from other movement types such as those you refer to, but I think it's perfectly feasible - all it needs is for Canon (etc) to invest in the necessary R&D.

But, a better solution would be to develop an EVF that had zero lag.

Or, perhaps just make the shutter button touch sensitive, so that an initial touch activated the EVF, then half-pressure activated the AF and metering, and full pressure took the photo. The potential problem with the latter solution is that it wouldn't work with gloved hands, but most photographers I know cut off the tips of the glove index finger anyway, so it isn't a huge issue..
 
Sep 5, 2018
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Scotland
The R5 startup could be fixed by moving the power button to the shutter like Nikon. In one action I have the camera switched on and up to my face then focusing. I also have the EVF sleep switched off so it is always running as long as the switch is on. I don't understand the positioning of the power button on Canon mirrorless just now, it only makes sense when the camera can ether wake instantly and/or has the battery life of a DSLR.
 
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AlanF

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Aug 16, 2012
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The R5 startup could be fixed by moving the power button to the shutter like Nikon. In one action I have the camera switched on and up to my face then focusing. I also have the EVF sleep switched off so it is always running as long as the switch is on. I don't understand the positioning of the power button on Canon mirrorless just now, it only makes sense when the camera can ether wake instantly and/or has the battery life of a DSLR.
Half pressing the shutter button on the R5 powers it up from sleep.
 
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FrenchFry

Wildlife enthusiast!
Jun 14, 2020
462
580
The R5 startup could be fixed by moving the power button to the shutter like Nikon. In one action I have the camera switched on and up to my face then focusing. I also have the EVF sleep switched off so it is always running as long as the switch is on. I don't understand the positioning of the power button on Canon mirrorless just now, it only makes sense when the camera can ether wake instantly and/or has the battery life of a DSLR.
I would be a huge fan of a shutter with built-in power button. I've gotten used to it, but this was the hardest thing for me to adjust to on the R5 coming from Nikon.