It looks like Canon will begin shipping the Canon RF 800mm f/5.6L IS USM and Canon RF 1200mm f/8L IS USM on May 26, 2022 in limited quantities, which is likely fine because I imagine these will be purchased in limited quantities.

Canon RF 800mm f/5.6L IS USM Key Features

  • Outstanding Image Quality, 800mm Super-telephoto Fixed Focal Length Lens
  • Expands the EOS R System
  • Impressively Light at 6.9 lbs., While Retaining High Levels of Image Quality
  • Minimum Focusing Distance of Approx. 8.53′
  • Optical Image Stabilization with up to 4.5 Stops of Shake Correction
  • Three IS Operation Modes
  • Super Spectra Coating (SSC) and Air Sphere Coating (ASC) Helps Minimize
  • Ghosting and Flare
  • Compatible with Canon RF1.4x and 2x Extenders
  • Customizable Electronic Focus Ring, with Manual Focus Capability during SERVO AF

Canon RF 1200mm f/8L IS USM Key Features

  • Outstanding Image Quality, 1200mm Super-telephoto Fixed Focal Length Lens
  • Expands the EOS R System
  • Impressively Light at 7.4 lbs., While Retaining High Levels of Image Quality
  • Minimum Focusing Distance of Approx. 14.1′
  • Optical Image Stabilization with up to 4 Stops of Shake Correction
  • Three IS Operation Modes
  • Super Spectra Coating (SSC) and Air Sphere Coating (ASC) Helps Minimize
  • Ghosting and Flare
  • Compatible with Canon RF1.4x and RF2x Extenders
  • Customizable Electronic Focus Ring, with Manual Focus Capability during SERVO AF

Canon RF 800mm f/5.6L IS USM //  Canon RF 1200mm f/8L IS USM

Go to discussion...

30 comments

  1. What do these things cost again?
    In USA the 800 costs 30% more than the 600
    In Europe the 800 costs 42% more than the 600

    Sorry, Canon Europe. You will not get the deal ...
  2. I can agree that these are stupid prices, but let me mention that I managed to put my hands on them a few weeks back for a few minutes, and they are quite handholdable - though I'll most certainly buy a 600/4 when the time comes, and extend with a TC if needed.
  3. Will anyone who is not an agency (i.e. anyone spending their own money) buy these? There are a surprising number of hobbyists with the $12k 400 and 600mm lenses. But these are in a-whole-nother class of expensive.
    -Brian
  4. Will anyone who is not an agency (i.e. anyone spending their own money) buy these? There are a surprising number of hobbyists with the $12k 400 and 600mm lenses. But these are in a-whole-nother class of expensive.
    -Brian
    Then they share they image on IG, ROI Pure Win
  5. Will anyone who is not an agency (i.e. anyone spending their own money) buy these? There are a surprising number of hobbyists with the $12k 400 and 600mm lenses. But these are in a-whole-nother class of expensive.
    Perhaps. I suspect if one can afford to spend $13K on a lens (which is what I paid for my 600/4 II back in 2012), there's not much difference between that and $17K or $20K. For me, at least, it's about getting something that offers a capability beyond what one has currently. The 600/4 III and RF 600/4 are not optically better than the 600/4 II; they are lighter, but I can hike and shoot handheld with the MkII version already. For these lenses, I can get to 840/5.6 and 1200/8 with the TCs behind my 600/4, so they don't really offer anything I don't have (except the ability to easily be extended further with TCs, but I can do that now with a modified EF-RF adapter and the EF and RF TCs I have).
  6. Will anyone who is not an agency (i.e. anyone spending their own money) buy these? There are a surprising number of hobbyists with the $12k 400 and 600mm lenses. But these are in a-whole-nother class of expensive.
    -Brian

    If you're hobby is wildlife photography and you are at a point in your life you can afford it, yes there are many who would buy it. It is a hobby.

    I would consider one but looking at the MTF charts it looks like the value isn't going to be there. If the 800mm results are not substantially better than a 600mm with an extender then it wouldn't be appealing to me. We will have to wait and see what they produce.
    • Ghosting and Flare
    Surely, Canon could have left that feature out, making the lenses correspondingly cheaper?

    No barrel, pincushion, vignetting, or other distortions! No wonder they're so cheap! :LOL:
  7. Incredible focal length of lens. I've the 600 F4 II. It's a great lens but its big and heavy. I have hand held it but its not good for you.
    I usually use it on a solid tripod with a wimberly gimbal head which is another few KG's added to the load.
    Getting a bag that fit it was difficult. Even if I could afford 800/1200 I wouldn't consider it due to the logistic effort of moving it around.
    I often use a 2 extender with the 600mm. It can be quite tricking actually find something you see with 1200mm. One piece of grass or a tree can look very much like another at 1200mm. I think I'd find an 800 or 1200 a very inflexible lens.
    There's alot to be said for a 100-500mm or a 200-600mm far more flexible and lighter.
    Still there is a market for the ultimate. Maybe it will come with a free donkey to carry it on treks.
  8. Incredible focal length of lens. I've the 600 F4 II. It's a great lens but its big and heavy. I have hand held it but its not good for you.
    I usually use it on a solid tripod with a wimberly gimbal head which is another few KG's added to the load.
    Getting a bag that fit it was difficult. Even if I could afford 800/1200 I wouldn't consider it due to the logistic effort of moving it around.
    I often use a 2 extender with the 600mm. It can be quite tricking actually find something you see with 1200mm. One piece of grass or a tree can look very much like another at 1200mm. I think I'd find an 800 or 1200 a very inflexible lens.
    There's alot to be said for a 100-500mm or a 200-600mm far more flexible and lighter.
    Still there is a market for the ultimate. Maybe it will come with a free donkey to carry it on treks.
    I went for a long hike (for me) today with the 100-500 and shot close ups of butterflies and dragonflies and then birds in flight with the same lens. It’s a great compromise for me for me for everyday shooting though a light wider prime would be good for me on more special occasions.
  9. I will repeat: these prices are a signal of significant price inflation ahead for other lenses. They are priced for the future, and the 400 and 600 will catch up. You will look back on $12k big whites as "the good old days" if you don't buy now.
  10. Incredible focal length of lens. I've the 600 F4 II. It's a great lens but its big and heavy. I have hand held it but its not good for you.
    I usually use it on a solid tripod with a wimberly gimbal head which is another few KG's added to the load.
    Getting a bag that fit it was difficult. Even if I could afford 800/1200 I wouldn't consider it due to the logistic effort of moving it around.
    I often use a 2 extender with the 600mm. It can be quite tricking actually find something you see with 1200mm. One piece of grass or a tree can look very much like another at 1200mm. I think I'd find an 800 or 1200 a very inflexible lens.
    There's alot to be said for a 100-500mm or a 200-600mm far more flexible and lighter.
    Still there is a market for the ultimate. Maybe it will come with a free donkey to carry it on treks.

    The 600 F4 version 3 is much lighter than your version 2.

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