Catching up

7enderbender

EOS 7D MK II
Feb 17, 2011
643
3
Boston, MA
#1
I've been out of commission for a while with regards to photography. Didn't feel like picking anything up after eye surgery and some limitations in my left eye as a result of it. Trying to get back into it and maybe learn using the other eye. And my daughter just got herself her first real camera for photography and videos (T7i). She did her own research, went back and forth between Canon, Nikon and stuff like Sony and the other mirrorless brands. I really tried to stay neutral and only answered questions best I could. She had access to my 5DII kit before but wanted to start her own with her own money (she's 15 and way more disciplined than I ever was...).
What I found interesting is that she immediately ruled out anything mirrorless, both because of the form factor and the view finders. While hanging out in the local stores a few times with her I had a look at the new R series. I don't get it. What's the purpose of that? Why is Canon introducing yet another line of lenses that are incompatible with previous systems? (I'm one of those who is still mad they abandond the old FD mount, but hey). I hope they don't phase out the regular EF cameras and real cameras.
 
Nov 1, 2018
40
17
London
#2
EF is compatible with RF with the provided adapter. It does not appear to be the same situation as FD to EF fortunately. I’m strongly considering the new RP and also using EF lenses for a few years.
 

beforeEos Camaras

love to take photos.
Sep 8, 2014
263
45
#3
its good to embrace some doubt. but you can mentor your child wile your eye is not like what it used to be your years of experience is still in your minds eye. she got that from you. also will learn and build on the foundation you started.
 
Likes: 7enderbender

dak723

EOS 6D MK II
Oct 26, 2013
1,141
431
#4
Canon, as well as Nikon have just relesed their first mirrorless FF cameras, but, of course, mirrorless cameras have been around for a while (especially in crop cameras) and Sony is now in its 3rd generation of FF mirrorless cameas. While DSLRs are still the majority of sales in Interchangeable Lens type cameras worldwide, mirrorless is now slightly more popular in Japan (and perhaps Asia?). They are just as "real" as DSLRS. In very general terms, whether one chooses mirrorless or a DSLR often comes down to whether one prefers the EVF (electronic viewfinder) or the OVF of the DSLR. EVFs (and thus mirrorless) offer a WYSIWIG experience in terms of exposure, so that is one possible advantage. Additional information is also easier to show in the viewfinder. Removing the mirror assembly, also makes it possible to make the camera somewhat small and lighter. With no mirror, lenses can be redisigned to take advantage of the smaller distance between back of lens and sensor, thus both Canon and Nikon are coming out with a new lineup of lenses. Canon's EF lenses are fully compatible with the R series of cameras with adapter. Canon is offering 3 different adapters - 2 of which that actually increase the functionality of the EF lenses.

At the moment, both types of cameras have some advantages and disadvantages. DSLRs still offer better battery life and there is, of course, no lag in the viewfinder information thus seemingly continuing to make it the better choice among birders, wildlife and sports photographers. While the tech-minded folks on this forum - and perhaps the internet in general - are pushing mirrorless to replace DSLRs, there seems to be no good reason to assume that will happen and my guess is that both systems will co-exist for some time. Of course, sales will ultimately decide if mirrorless cameras do replace the DSLR.
 

Mt Spokane Photography

I post too Much on Here!!
Mar 25, 2011
15,033
404
#5
I purchased a R to use alongside my 5D MK IV, it replaced my SL-2. It turns out that it gets most of my use now, the size is close to a T7i, the EVF is usable in most situations, and works well in low light. AF is accurate on a zoom at all focal lengths and distances, this overcomes a issue with fast zoom lenses, particularly 3rd party lenses.

As others noted, the slight delay between shots is a issue when you are shooting moving subjects, because the subject appears to jump between shots and you can't continuously track them thru the viewfinder. I'm not sure what the reason is(I have theories but no actual knowledge), it seems to occur with mirrorless bodies, most are worse than the R.

A DSLR is still going to be better for a all around body, but for many, if not most, mirrorless is as good, probably better.

The T7i is missing AFMA, which is a feature all DSLR's should have. Lenses tend to have a wide tolerance in autofocus accuracy, it varies by distance to subject, and in a zoom, it varies by your focal length as well. With slower consumer lenses, the greater depth of field tends to hide the issue, which may be why its not on a T7i. If your daughter gets serious about photography and gets any fast lenses and expects to use them with a wide aperture, then the inability to adjust the camera to tweak autofocus may frustrate her. Fortunately, the T7i can use the live view and DPAF, which will focus quickly and accurately to eliminate lens autofocus errors. If she purchases any fast or L lenses, she should check them immediately and have Canon adjust them if they are in warranty. Used ones are most often prone to inaccuracies but not all, and you have to pay to adjust them, so new ones may be a better deal with a T7i.
 

Kit.

EOS 7D MK II
Apr 25, 2011
633
210
#6
While hanging out in the local stores a few times with her I had a look at the new R series. I don't get it. What's the purpose of that? Why is Canon introducing yet another line of lenses that are incompatible with previous systems?
My understanding is:

Back in the film age, you weren't used to buying a new camera every 2-4 years. The cameras lasted longer because they did not become "morally obsolete"; instead, they became "classic". There was some progress in the image sensor technology, but as the image sensors were interchangeable (film), it did not affect camera sales much. Still, everyone who wanted a camera had one.

Then the world got the digital camera sales boom. The sensors became an integral part of the camera, the sensor technology had a potential for growth, and the camera manufacturers enjoyed a huge boost in yearly sales.

Now, the digital sensor technology matures, the sales of "enthusiast"/"pro" level cameras are returning to their pre-digital levels, the P&S market is mostly lost to smartphones, and the camera manufacturers need to find some new tricks to continue selling more cameras per year than the consumer actually needs.
 
Likes: Michael Clark
Feb 17, 2011
643
3
Boston, MA
#7
I

The T7i is missing AFMA, which is a feature all DSLR's should have. Lenses tend to have a wide tolerance in autofocus accuracy, it varies by distance to subject, and in a zoom, it varies by your focal length as well. With slower consumer lenses, the greater depth of field tends to hide the issue, which may be why its not on a T7i. If your daughter gets serious about photography and gets any fast lenses and expects to use them with a wide aperture, then the inability to adjust the camera to tweak autofocus may frustrate her. Fortunately, the T7i can use the live view and DPAF, which will focus quickly and accurately to eliminate lens autofocus errors. If she purchases any fast or L lenses, she should check them immediately and have Canon adjust them if they are in warranty. Used ones are most often prone to inaccuracies but not all, and you have to pay to adjust them, so new ones may be a better deal with a T7i.
She bought the T7i and I think it'll be a fantastic first camera for her. Wasn't aware of the microadjustment issue. I think it won't matter for a while. Plus she is always free to dive into my collection and use my 5D Mark II if she advances or has specific goals shooting with fast lenses. Maybe I got lucky with mine but never had a wide range of changes needed with the microadjustment on mine.