Sony "Tough" SD cards to reduce risk of card failure?

Frodo

EOS RP
Nov 3, 2012
298
17
I am considering purchasing a Sony "Tough" SD card as a way to reduce failure of the single SD card slot. My concern is that SD cards are physically fragile and I once had an SD card split, rendering it inoperable. The Sony Tough cards are one piece and do not have a potentially vulnerable write protect tab.
It does not appear that I will gain much from the higher speed of the UHS II card, so the main benefit is physical robustness.
Your thoughts?
 

privatebydesign

Would you take advice from a cartoons stuffed toy?
Jan 29, 2011
8,082
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I'd look at it like this.
1: How many times have I personally lost images on SD cards that are truly unrecoverable.
2: What was their value.
3: What is the industry standard for failure rate.
4: Is the Sony failure rate appreciably improved on the 'standard' failure rate.

Answer those four questions and you have some data to do a calculation of value to your personal situation.

For me the answers are
1: Never.
2: See 1
3: See 1
4: See 1

So for me the equation is simple, I buy Sandisk memory and SSD's when they are on specials always from a reputable dealer, not Amazon affiliates or the like.

Now that doesn't mean I haven't done stupid things with SD cards, I have run them through washing machines and yes I have broken them, but on each occasion I have got the data off of it. Didn't help when I lost one once but having a better card wouldn't have helped then either.
 
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Mt Spokane Photography

I post too Much on Here!!
Mar 25, 2011
15,595
808
Or your card reader, ingress can be time consuming especially with big cards with a lot of data.
Or the camera you get this Christmas, or next year. I bought a R last year, so I have a bunch of older cards that I don't want to use and bought two new ones.

That was a waste.
 

privatebydesign

Would you take advice from a cartoons stuffed toy?
Jan 29, 2011
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Or the camera you get this Christmas, or next year. I bought a R last year, so I have a bunch of older cards that I don't want to use and bought two new ones.

That was a waste.
I end up buying whatever capacity of cards I need and keep them for each camera, that way you get the right speed and capacity for the current camera, I then pass those cards along with that camera when I sell it/give it away so I don't end up with a frustrating array of comparatively small capacity and slow cards when I get a new body.

I am not an especially high volume shooter so each camera will have one or two dedicated cards. My M5 has a single Sandisk 128GB SD card, my 1DX MkII's have single 64GB capacity CFast and CF cards each. I like to KISS ;)
 
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Mt Spokane Photography

I post too Much on Here!!
Mar 25, 2011
15,595
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We have multiple devices that use cards, my 5D MK IV, my wife's compact camera, and several other cameras that I just keep around. I tend to collect old cameras, I still have my first one, a Olympus that used a Smart Card which is long gone from modern cameras, but I have a few because I keep them. I still have a type III PCMIA card, I may yet find a vintage camera that needs it. I sold my old Kodak DSLR and included one of my cards.
 

mkamelg

I'm New Here
Feb 1, 2015
19
7
Poland
I am considering purchasing a Sony "Tough" SD card as a way to reduce failure of the single SD card slot. My concern is that SD cards are physically fragile and I once had an SD card split, rendering it inoperable. The Sony Tough cards are one piece and do not have a potentially vulnerable write protect tab.
It does not appear that I will gain much from the higher speed of the UHS II card, so the main benefit is physical robustness.
Your thoughts?
This is what a SDHC 32GB Sony SF-G TOUGH UHS-II memory card looks like after six and a half months of daily use.



There are abrasions visible as bright spots in the corners of the card. How were they created? I would like to know myself. The housing of this memory card is very stiff, it is probably even stiffer than those used in Delkin Devices memory cards. Probably something in the memory card reader works like a file and "attacks" the memory card housing.

You have five years warranty (it says so on the back of the box in its upper left corner) on this memory card. Yes, there's no lifetime warranty here.

You have access to two very usefull applications https://www.sony.com/electronics/support/memory-cards-sd-cards/sf-g32t/downloads

A few days ago I had the opportunity to use this Memory Card File Rescue application because I accidentally deleted one file in the CR3 raw format and I was able to recover it without any problems.

Personally, I can't imagine working with EOS R without UHS-II speed class memory card (regardless of the brand), this type of memory card is the "key to success" when working with this camera.

"It does not appear that I will gain much from the higher speed of the UHS II card, so the main benefit is physical robustness."

Do you really think so?

 

Frodo

EOS RP
Nov 3, 2012
298
17
"It does not appear that I will gain much from the higher speed of the UHS II card, so the main benefit is physical robustness."

Do you really think so?

Thanks for sharing that link about memory card speed. There is no real difference between the best UHS-I cards and UHS-II cards until the EOS R buffer fills up. Indeed that report states: "UHS-I cards can provide decent performance in the EOS R for short bursts of photos, up to around 20 shots in RAW". I can not remember ever (including previous cameras) shooting a burst of more than 20 images. Hence my conclusion about speed not being of much benefit for me.

Your photos do show the 1 piece nature of the Sony Tough cards. The only SD failure I've experienced was when the two halves of an SD card separated and I've noticed that this and the plastic strips between the contacts on other cards appears to be vulnerable to physical damage. Privatebydesign has also broken them.

Your experience indicates that the Sony cards are built tough.
 

Frodo

EOS RP
Nov 3, 2012
298
17

koenkooi

EOS 7D MK II
Feb 25, 2015
577
347
Thanks for sharing that link about memory card speed. There is no real difference between the best UHS-I cards and UHS-II cards until the EOS R buffer fills up. Indeed that report states: "UHS-I cards can provide decent performance in the EOS R for short bursts of photos, up to around 20 shots in RAW". I can not remember ever (including previous cameras) shooting a burst of more than 20 images. Hence my conclusion about speed not being of much benefit for me.[..]
I went with UHS-II for everything because my cardreader can actually achieve the 300MB/s read speed, which is like 10 RAWs per second. Very nice if you return from a day of shooting with a 1000+ images on your card :)