Another interview about the EOS R and talk of an APS-C EOS R Body

justaCanonuser

Grab your camera, go out and shoot!
Feb 12, 2014
672
482
Frankfurt, Germany
Actually the Canon APS-C sensor is 38.5% the area of the FF sensor.
APC-S: 22.3 x 14.9mm = 332.27 sq/mm
FF: 36 x 24mm=864 sq/mm
In other words, the FF sensor is 2.6 times larger than the crop sensor.
Yupp, the laws of geometry are old but still quite magical for many people :) When I have my Mamiya 6 with me and people ask me why I use this strange camera that looks like a Leica on steroids, they are always stunned when I explain them that the size of its film negatives/positives is about four times as large as a 35mm frame.
 

nchoh

EOS RP
Apr 3, 2018
247
149
Calgary
Actually the Canon APS-C sensor is 38.5% the area of the FF sensor.
APC-S: 22.3 x 14.9mm = 332.27 sq/mm
FF: 36 x 24mm=864 sq/mm
In other words, the FF sensor is 2.6 times larger than the crop sensor.
Oops! I took the wrong dimensions.
 

takesome1

EOS R
Aug 23, 2013
1,490
122
99
Licking, Missouri
I'm not denying that the difference might have been greater, but comparing prices of an 80D (all around current Canon tech except 4k), 6D (all around old Canon tech) and 6D II (all around current Canon tech except 4k and sensor), it looks to me that APS-C provides some great cost Potential for cost reduction. The 80D ist 900€, the 6D 1000€ and the 6D II is 1750€ on the german Amazon site.

Just because of the size difference, you will always get slightly more than 4 times as many APS-C sensors for the same material and production cost than full frame sensors. And you'll always lose less sensors at once when you have a defect in your wafer, increasing the yield advantage of aps-c further. How could that not affect cost significantly?

Apart from that, the M System is entirely different from the R System regarding its ecosystem. It is clearly all about size in contrast to R which seems to be all about image quality. Having the Option for something in between in the form of an APS-C R (less size thanks to crop, e.g. use a 85mm instead of 135mm and more IQ and ergonomics thanks to big glass and body) would nice in my opinion. If Canon thinks there are enough people that feel alike, we'll see an APS-C R.
APS-C was created, among other reasons, as a way to make DSLR cameras affordable too the masses. The cost argument had much more merit when a FF sensor would cost 5x as much. It allowed SLR users to keep their lenses and move to a digital body.

The gap has closed significantly.

You are right, Canon will sell a body if enough people want it. Provided they can make money at it.

I just do not see a reason or believe there will be enough demand for APS-C sensor in the R. The M fills the APS-C mirrorless sensor role nicely.

To me older generation FF sensors for cheap bodies and possibly the release of cheap RF lenses would be the direction they take, rather than creating an off shoot APS-C RFS line.
 
Oct 10, 2018
2
0
the camera business faces a Sea Change driven by the camera phone. The good ol' DSLR faces a challenge on 2 levels: First: Image quality. Here it appears moving the lens closer to the sensor helps in lens design. But second: the tradition DSLR has a beautiful optical viewfinder; the digital ones seem harsh by comparison and a camera-phone has none at all. I'll stick to a 7D or 5D.

where this goes -- time will tell. There will always be artists who will prefer the traditional glass view-finder as one may sense the feeling of an image better in glass than in a harsh-lit digital.
 

Mt Spokane Photography

I post too Much on Here!!
Mar 25, 2011
16,108
1,204
APS-C was created, among other reasons, as a way to make DSLR cameras affordable too the masses.
You are not going far enough back. It is true that smaller image sensors cost less per unit area than large sensors. That's due to imperfections on the surface of silicon wafers, the larger the sensor, the more likely it will have imperfections, so more are unusable. Small sensors also fit more efficiently on a circular wafer, so there is less waste.

THE APS (advanced photo system) was first created for film cameras. Film came in APS-H (30.2 X 16.7 mm), APS-C (25.1 X 16.7 mm), and APS-P (30.2 × 9.5 mm). I had a Canon APS film camera that came with a 22-55mm zoom. (It might still be in my box of old cameras). APS (active pixel sensor) has another meaning with regard to sensors, CMOS sensors use APS technology which can confuse the situation.

APS-C size digital sensors used a similar crop factor to APS-C film. The Canon D30 and D60 were Canon's first APS-C DSLRs and not created for the masses, but for prosumers. APS-H DSLRs were the first pro level sensors used in Canon D1 series cameras and also based on APS film.

After the D30 and D60, and 10D, Canon shocked the industry with the Digital Rebel using APS-C sensors and a $1K price tag.