As I grow older....

sanj

EOS R5
Jan 22, 2012
3,621
479
As I grow older, getting the shot is becoming more of a priority than technical nit picking. As a result:
a) I prefer zooms to prime lenses as I can get the correct composition faster and not miss on acton/story. When I see the final photo the modern zooms look sharp enough to me, I many times can't tell if it was a zoom or a prime.
b) I am ok with f2 or 2.8 verses f1.2 or 1.4. The difference in background blur is minimal but the 2.8 lenses are lighter and focus faster. (Besides modern cameras are excellent at higher ISO...)

Does anyone else relate?
 

Maximilian

The dark side - I've been there
CR Pro
Nov 7, 2013
3,068
1,155
Germany
sanj said:
As I grow older, getting the shot is becoming more of a priority than technical nit picking.
...
Does anyone else relate?
Hi Sanjay!

In short I'd say it that way (as a lot before): "The best camera is the one in your hand!"

Long version: it all depends on what you're shooting:
  • event, action, sport, wildlife, etc. photography requires the "getting the shot, getting the moment" approach, so versatile and fast gear (zoom, fps) should be preferred
  • if you have time or even the need to plan your shot you can also think about the best technical approach (which lens, which angle, best light, etc.)
  • and of course there is nothing more important than at least a decent usable sharp focus (except for some artsy work)

Personally I preferred zooms in the past while I now prefer a good mixture of both zoom and primes.
 

YuengLinger

Sufficiently Pixilated
CR Pro
Dec 20, 2012
3,144
1,404
USA
Does the trend end with a smartphone being good enough?

Or maybe just being regular?
 

sanj

EOS R5
Jan 22, 2012
3,621
479
I know of an extremely talented photographer who has reached the iPhone stage. I have not. It does not have the lensing, speed or IQ to get the shot.

Since I am after 'getting the shot', iPhone does not qualify.
 

AcutancePhotography

EOS 5D Mark IV
May 8, 2013
1,853
1
I tend on going in the opposite direction. As I get older, I find myself using primes more often and slowing down to get the shot. That's the nice thing about photography, we both are interested in getting "the shot" but can approach it from different aspects.
 

sanj

EOS R5
Jan 22, 2012
3,621
479
Well yes I agree slowing down does help at times (not always - street and wildlife being examples). But the point is, even when slowing down very rarely do I find the results of primes better than zooms. Rarely if ever, I stop myself while looking at a photo and saying "Wow that was a prime."
 

Besisika

How can you stand out, if you do like evrybdy else
Mar 25, 2014
721
142
Montreal
AcutancePhotography said:
I tend on going in the opposite direction. As I get older, I find myself using primes more often and slowing down to get the shot. That's the nice thing about photography, we both are interested in getting "the shot" but can approach it from different aspects.
I am in between the two of you for different reasons.
When outdoor, I use zoom (mainly the 70-200 and 100-400) for both sports and portraiture. Both are as sharp as primes and give me flexibility, and I prefer their perspective+compression.
When indoor, primes are still irreplaceable due to low light and space and almost one of them always gets in the way. I reach out for the 85 1.2 and 35 1.4 ART.
When shooting videos, outdoor I always use the zoom as they take the same ND filter (as well as the 24-70 f4). Indoor, always prime due to space. I only use zoom when told not to move around.
 

Zeidora

EOS RP
Feb 15, 2015
667
10
AcutancePhotography said:
I tend on going in the opposite direction. As I get older, I find myself using primes more often and slowing down to get the shot. That's the nice thing about photography, we both are interested in getting "the shot" but can approach it from different aspects.
Same here. I don't own a zoom, used to have a couple. Fast glass is not for its speed, but rather better image correction otherwise. I rather go out with a distinct objective (yesterday was mushrooms) and less gear, than bringing the entire arsenal along. It would be hard for me to carry all my dSLR stuff, not to mention LF. The "light" pack is >40 lb already.
 

sanj

EOS R5
Jan 22, 2012
3,621
479
Zeidora said:
AcutancePhotography said:
I tend on going in the opposite direction. As I get older, I find myself using primes more often and slowing down to get the shot. That's the nice thing about photography, we both are interested in getting "the shot" but can approach it from different aspects.
Same here. I don't own a zoom, used to have a couple. Fast glass is not for its speed, but rather better image correction otherwise. I rather go out with a distinct objective (yesterday was mushrooms) and less gear, than bringing the entire arsenal along. It would be hard for me to carry all my dSLR stuff, not to mention LF. The "light" pack is >40 lb already.
Exactly what used to slow me down, am moving away from that. Finding freedom and creativity. Each to his own I guess.
 

Hector1970

EOS R
Mar 22, 2012
1,199
365
As I grow older...

I think content and composition of photographs is far more important than equipment. All modern cameras and lens are pretty good. The latest bells and whistle's are becoming less useful
I care less about MFT charts and more about whether a lens does a reasonable job for me.
I care less about acquiring new gear and try to use what I have.
I spend more of my money going to new places that on gear.
I stay a few more metres back from the raging sea.
I understand the value of good light.
I wear gel pads on my knees as I've learn better landscape photographs are taken closer to the ground but kneeling is getting harder.
I am more prepared to walk away with no photograph that take poor photographs.
I rate beauty less. It's not that interesting after a while. Its great fun photographing beautiful models but the photographs are meaningless. Interesting faces of ordinary people are much better subjects.
I'm less concerned about what Nikon and Sony are doing. Canon are doing just fine - nothing too exciting but the gear works and is robust.
I've learnt that on forums people have an amazing ability to be completely dismissive of other peoples opinions. People seem to lose their kindness and sense of fair play just to prove that they are right. It's a pity when we loose our humanity.
 

chauncey

EOS RP
Jun 5, 2011
564
1
I'm 73 y/o, have been into this insane hobby over 8 years and only shoot primes.
Am also heavy into PS CC....am anal retentive as to image quality.
 

Zeidora

EOS RP
Feb 15, 2015
667
10
sanj said:
Zeidora said:
AcutancePhotography said:
I tend on going in the opposite direction. As I get older, I find myself using primes more often and slowing down to get the shot. That's the nice thing about photography, we both are interested in getting "the shot" but can approach it from different aspects.
Same here. I don't own a zoom, used to have a couple. Fast glass is not for its speed, but rather better image correction otherwise. I rather go out with a distinct objective (yesterday was mushrooms) and less gear, than bringing the entire arsenal along. It would be hard for me to carry all my dSLR stuff, not to mention LF. The "light" pack is >40 lb already.
Exactly what used to slow me down, am moving away from that. Finding freedom and creativity. Each to his own I guess.
Slow is good. That is possibly the biggest thing I learned from LF. Ten LF shots in a day is a lot. LF-zooms? The closest is a triple convertible. The camera weight forces me to be in good shape, which I see as a plus.
 

sanj

EOS R5
Jan 22, 2012
3,621
479
Hector1970 said:
As I grow older...

I think content and composition of photographs is far more important than equipment. All modern cameras and lens are pretty good. The latest bells and whistle's are becoming less useful
I care less about MFT charts and more about whether a lens does a reasonable job for me.
I care less about acquiring new gear and try to use what I have.
I spend more of my money going to new places that on gear.
I stay a few more metres back from the raging sea.
I understand the value of good light.
I wear gel pads on my knees as I've learn better landscape photographs are taken closer to the ground but kneeling is getting harder.
I am more prepared to walk away with no photograph that take poor photographs.
I rate beauty less. It's not that interesting after a while. Its great fun photographing beautiful models but the photographs are meaningless. Interesting faces of ordinary people are much better subjects.
I'm less concerned about what Nikon and Sony are doing. Canon are doing just fine - nothing too exciting but the gear works and is robust.
I've learnt that on forums people have an amazing ability to be completely dismissive of other peoples opinions. People seem to lose their kindness and sense of fair play just to prove that they are right. It's a pity when we loose our humanity.
Thank you so much. This is what I am thinking.
 

sanj

EOS R5
Jan 22, 2012
3,621
479
chauncey said:
I'm 73 y/o, have been into this insane hobby over 8 years and only shoot primes.
Am also heavy into PS CC....am anal retentive as to image quality.
I understand. But my point is that as life moves ahead and I learn more about the actual impact of photography, I find the difference between f1.4 and 2 is not really so much and the IQ difference between modern zooms and prime is rarely visible.
 

sanj

EOS R5
Jan 22, 2012
3,621
479
Besisika said:
AcutancePhotography said:
I tend on going in the opposite direction. As I get older, I find myself using primes more often and slowing down to get the shot. That's the nice thing about photography, we both are interested in getting "the shot" but can approach it from different aspects.
I am in between the two of you for different reasons.
When outdoor, I use zoom (mainly the 70-200 and 100-400) for both sports and portraiture. Both are as sharp as primes and give me flexibility, and I prefer their perspective+compression.
When indoor, primes are still irreplaceable due to low light and space and almost one of them always gets in the way. I reach out for the 85 1.2 and 35 1.4 ART.
When shooting videos, outdoor I always use the zoom as they take the same ND filter (as well as the 24-70 f4). Indoor, always prime due to space. I only use zoom when told not to move around.
I see your point and agree.
But I am at a point where I would go with JUST the new 24-70mm indoors and leave the 85 and 35 behind. Although I love my 85 1.2 and my prime 35, I find that in the end photo many times I can't tell the difference. I keep my 85 1.2 and don't sell it for one purpose only: Walk on the street of Bangkok and such at night to take photos in available light.
 

sanj

EOS R5
Jan 22, 2012
3,621
479
chauncey said:
I'm 73 y/o, have been into this insane hobby over 8 years and only shoot primes.
Am also heavy into PS CC....am anal retentive as to image quality.
I have been into this insane hobby over 35 years and when I was 8 years into it, I thought EXACTLY like you sir.
 

YuengLinger

Sufficiently Pixilated
CR Pro
Dec 20, 2012
3,144
1,404
USA
chauncey said:
I'm 73 y/o, have been into this insane hobby over 8 years and only shoot primes.
Am also heavy into PS CC....am anal retentive as to image quality.
Is there a connection between prolonged sitting to work with PS CC and the retentiveness?

I definitely don't carry around as much never-needed-stuff in a backpack. Two lenses and a CP filter, sometimes a tripod. That's it even for traveling.

I do like to have a prime for lower light and shallow DoF.
 

Ian_of_glos

EOS RP
Jun 12, 2012
263
52
England
At what age is this likely to happen? I have now reached 60, and I find that I am using primes more than I did 2 or 3 years ago. They are easier to use and I am just not happy with the results I achieve with some of my zoom lenses. Also, in most cases my prime lenses are smaller, lighter and faster than any of my zooms. Usually I know what I am going to be photographing before I go out, so I don't need to carry a lot of different lenses with me.
We are all different though, and I am sure that many people prefer the flexibility of a zoom.
 

Boyer U. Klum-Cey

EOS 90D
CR Pro
Dec 27, 2011
101
7
At over 800 months in baby language math, I think I have a 24-70 on, more often then not. My LightRoom library confirms the 24-70 theory. More & more, I find myself making the tough choice: "What do you really need, and how are you going to carry it?" Fortunately, someone invented bags with both shoulder and belt straps for the days when the internal decision making process fails to reach consensus.

And, of course, the iPhone 6s, as long as you have no intention of printing, does get the shots(usually washed down with a beer), eh?