Canon Adds EOS R50 and EOS R8 to the Growing EOS R Mirrorless Camera System

AlanF

Desperately seeking birds
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Aug 16, 2012
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I have used AF for insects on occasions, e.g. butterflies in flight, but in-flight butterflies change their outline or "shape" as they flap their wings, which makes it very challenging for subject recognition algorithms. AF works much better with dragonflies, as they hover and their shape is more easily recognised and tracked by the camera. Some of my best butterfly in flight shots were actually taken on an old Canon 6D, which had notoriously poor AF, so the hit rate was pretty low!
AF works perfectly for DIF both on DSLRs and mirrorless. I think it is because their wings flap so fast, are often transparent and relatively small that they are invisible to the AF compared with the body.
 
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tron

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I think the NIKON Z7 II is a decent camera, but it depends on what you're shooting. I don't want to start a Canon vs Nikon debate here. In the end, we can take it that Nikon is ONLY :) 34 years behind Canon when it comes to the 85 1.2.

:ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:. Well that's it. This number will not increase to 35!!!
 
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From DPR's reviewers:

R50: "The R50's most compelling feature is probably its autofocus system. It's a relatively simple but very powerful system..."

R8: "The point is that all these models have had corners cut. While both the Z5 and a7C cut theirs in terms of the sensor, offering older chips, Canon has chosen the opposite route: delivering most of the R6 II's image quality, capture speed and autofocus smarts in a more rudimentary body. It's up to each buyer to decide which approach they prefer."
 
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From DPR's reviewers:

R50: "The R50's most compelling feature is probably its autofocus system. It's a relatively simple but very powerful system..."

R8: "The point is that all these models have had corners cut. While both the Z5 and a7C cut theirs in terms of the sensor, offering older chips, Canon has chosen the opposite route: delivering most of the R6 II's image quality, capture speed and autofocus smarts in a more rudimentary body. It's up to each buyer to decide which approach they prefer."
Uncommon common-sense from DPR! - ie cheaper bodies always have pluses and minuses, especially compared to more expensive versionst. There are different variations of that between brands, and the one you choose will depend on your needs. I can't disagree.
 
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Anyone is excited about these releases? I read lots of disappointments here and not much activity around follow up posts. CR guy cheerfully announced the M's death and not much left to maneuver around. :p
These will predictably be Canon's best-selling cameras while people will get more excited for the R5 S and R1.
 
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Anyone is excited about these releases? I read lots of disappointments here and not much activity around follow up posts. CR guy cheerfully announced the M's death and not much left to maneuver around. :p
I guess a lot of people here are in the market for R6mkii, R5 and other higher up cameras. So entry-level camera are reviewed very critically and the lack of features which comes with this price point isn´t perceived as a reason to be joyful. Furthermore, a lot of people here already own a R series camera and might be looking for other features (to upgrade). Especially original EOS R owners, other forum members and myself included, would have liked to see additional features for the R8 coming from the R.

However, I am excited about new lens options (that 24-50mm should be marvelous for hiking alongside a RF 16mm or a RF-S UWA option for an APS-C body) and the growing R system! I am sure others are too! And to be realistic: Canon will sell way more R8´s and R50´s than R5 or R3 and such. So, that's a reason to be excited because it strengthens the system!
 
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Del Paso

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Anyone is excited about these releases? I read lots of disappointments here and not much activity around follow up posts. CR guy cheerfully announced the M's death and not much left to maneuver around.
What is really exciting about these cameras is the fact that Canon are expanding their customer base towards the lower price segment. And, at the same time, offering an M-line alternative.
I also fully agree with "Exploreshootshare" that many (most?) forum members are certainly more interested in R5 II, R6 II, R1 or R3 than in entrance-segment models.
"Lots of disappointment here", I might answer that one reads what one wants to read...
 
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kmrahe

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Feb 2, 2023
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Anyone is excited about these releases? I read lots of disappointments here and not much activity around follow up posts. CR guy cheerfully announced the M's death and not much left to maneuver around. :p
At least those telling people to avoid the M50 for who knows how long have an alternative to offer other than sending people to other brands or suggesting they get a T7, which was even worse advice than letting them go with the M50.
 
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Anyone is excited about these releases? I read lots of disappointments here and not much activity around follow up posts. CR guy cheerfully announced the M's death and not much left to maneuver around. :p
I use the RF 16 as a walk-around lens, especially for candid shots in social settings, and I'm v interested in adding the 24-50 for the same
 
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Personally, I find that using the joystick (or touch screen AF) is a lot slower than focus/recompose, especially if the subject is moving, or is likely to move. I'm happy if your technique works for you.
Actually, when I am paying attention to it, I've found out that I mostly use the joystick to select AF/(Evaluative)Metering subject while shooting ultrawide (14mm). Maybe I'm generally way too slow/imprecise to "recompose" and/or too lazy to do AE lock unless absolutely necessary.

But just a couple of suggestions which I hope are helpful:
In cases 1 & 2, why don't you assign a button to switch instantly to your desired settings?
I do. I have "Eye AF" on the AF-On button, "AF Method" selection on the lens ring, and Mode 2 on "Initial Servo AF pt".

Actually, there is a trick: with this configuration on R5, if you are in any AF spot method (including the Face+Tracking method) and you press the "Eye AF" button first, the camera will select the subject by itself from the whole frame. If you half-press the shutter button (with its default AF+Metering configuration) first and then press the "Eye AF" button, the camera starts tracking from around your pre-selected point.

Or, if you know in advance what you are going to shoot, why not assign all the appropriate settings to a custom mode?
Too lazy/insecure for setting up, testing, saving and recalling the configs. If I could define a gazillion custom modes and then assign them to mode dial slots without the need to keep only 3 modes in camera memory, I would be more inclined to do that.
 
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Here we are begging for fast/wide/midrange lenses, and meanwhile on the Sony side of the pond:

View attachment 207661
Just goes to show you can't have everything lol
Canon cranking out APS-C cameras only made the lens situation worse.
Now there are not enough APS-C lenses on top of not enough full-frame lenses.
 
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kmrahe

EOS M50 Mark II
Feb 2, 2023
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Has anyone really thought through the idea that having the same mount for APS-C and full-frame cameras is a good thing? The only real benefit I see is that it gives APS-C users access to a wide array of lenses that, while not specifically tailored to their camera, don't require an adapter. Beyond that, I see having a common mount as a negative. While it's touted that someone invested in RF-S lenses can keep them if and when they upgrade to a full frame camera, in practice this really isn't a very attractive thing to do. Not only will those RF-S lenses limit the capability of a full frame camera to that of an APS-C camera in some important respects, unless the FF sensor has at least 50% more pixels than the APS-C camera they're "upgrading" from, they will actually get less detail from those lenses on the FF than they did on their APS-C camera. To me this seems like a huge disincentive for Canon to develop a full line of RF-S lenses, as owning them will be almost as much of a deterrent to upgrading to a FF as owning EF-M lenses is.
 
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davidespinosa

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Feb 12, 2020
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@kmrahe

An APS-C lens on a FF sensor isn't really practical.

The other way is practical and enables several use cases:
* Start with APS-C, upgrade to FF
* Use FF, with APS-C as backup
* Use both FF and APS-C, depending on the type of photography.

Of course, R-series APS-C is larger than M-series APS-C.
When the R100 comes out, I bet it will look like the Nikon Z30:

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1713849-REG/nikon_z30_mirrorless_camera.html
 
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kmrahe

EOS M50 Mark II
Feb 2, 2023
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@kmrahe

An APS-C lens on a FF sensor isn't really practical.

The other way is practical and enables several use cases:
* Start with APS-C, upgrade to FF
* Use FF, with APS-C as backup
* Use both FF and APS-C, depending on the type of photography.

Of course, R-series APS-C is larger than M-series APS-C.
When the R100 comes out, I bet it will look like the Nikon Z30:

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1713849-REG/nikon_z30_mirrorless_camera.html
I'm just looking at the likelihood that the R50 will ever be a complete replacement for the M50 considering the latter's combination of compact size, moderate price, lens choices and quality and capabilities of the body and EF-M lenses. At this point I think it's questionable.
 
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davidespinosa

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I'm just looking at the likelihood that the R50 will ever be a complete replacement for the M50 considering the latter's combination of compact size, moderate price, lens choices and quality and capabilities of the body and EF-M lenses. At this point I think it's questionable.

Those are good criteria.
According to those criteria, I think the R50 beats the M50, once the RF-S 22mm and RF-S 11-22mm come out.
 
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kmrahe

EOS M50 Mark II
Feb 2, 2023
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Those are good criteria.
According to those criteria, I think the R50 beats the M50, once the RF-S 22mm and RF-S 11-22mm come out.
But your earlier comment - as well as comments from several others in other forums - suggests that R50 users should really stick with RF glass rather than invest in RF-S. I think Canon would rather have them do that, too, which makes me seriously question their commitment to RF-S. (They could surprise me, though. They surprised me with the R50 - I didn't think they would actually put out a lower-priced camera that would likely cannibalize R10 sales, but they did.)
 
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davidespinosa

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Feb 12, 2020
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...R50 users should really stick with RF glass rather than invest in RF-S.

But RF-S is smaller, lighter, and cheaper.
And some sports and wildlife people like the crop factor.
For example, compare the RF-S 18-150 to the RF 24-240:

RF-SRF
Focal length (mm)18-15024-240
Equivalent focal length (mm)28-24024-240
Aperture (F)3.5-6.34-6.3
Length (in)3.3-5.05.0-8.0
Filter size (mm)5572
Weight (oz)11.026.5
Price (USD)$500$900
 
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