DPP 5.0

PhotonShark

EOS M50
Jun 10, 2020
25
16
Dude, if that's your way of argumentation, then I am out.
You've played that record too long and it's worn out yet.
You might have noted the ";-)". That was the wink emoticon which indicated the light hearted nature of my reply. I presented valid arguments further on.
 

PhotonShark

EOS M50
Jun 10, 2020
25
16
The fact that is 6 years old is a somewhat meaningless argument.
Not really, 6 years ago Windows 10 hadn't been released and the Mac was still on Mavericks with the included iPhoto.

It does the job and costs nothing - I guess for some folks that is not enough.
DPP 3.0 did the job too. Then they released DPP 4.0.

Canon Professional Network Publishes DPP 4.0 ... on this very site!

It's now time past time for DPP 5.0
 

Jack Douglas

CR for the Humour
Apr 10, 2013
6,670
2,062
Alberta, Canada
Personally, I'm efficient with it and like it for wildlife and I haven't been doing much landscape and other shots that would benefit from more capability. One thing does irk me and that is it always defaults to 3X2 and has no option to set it to anything else for the time you may be wanting that choice. It's silly to mention how old it is because they have added good features over the last two or three years, making it significantly more useful. And I find the lens specific sharpening to be excellent.

Jack
 

Antono Refa

EOS R
Mar 26, 2014
1,139
315
Actually, it's part of the cost of the camera.
I think you have excessive expectations.

Say the only camera I ever bought was the PowerShot G15, back in 2012. Still in my bag next to the laptop, still working. Am I entitled to DPP in the box, eight years (and going) of free upgrades, and a modern & slick UI? For the $500 I paid, that's a lot of mileage.

Nikon avoided this situation by making viewNX free, and captureNX for >$100.
 

AlanF

Hands. Face. Space.
CR Pro
Aug 16, 2012
7,345
7,144
I think you have excessive expectations.

Say the only camera I ever bought was the PowerShot G15, back in 2012. Still in my bag next to the laptop, still working. Am I entitled to DPP in the box, eight years (and going) of free upgrades, and a modern & slick UI? For the $500 I paid, that's a lot of mileage.

Nikon avoided this situation by making viewNX free, and captureNX for >$100.
I downloaded CaptureNX from Nikon for free earlier this year.
Manufacturers have to provide basic viewing and editing software for their cameras otherwise not many would buy them - if Canon didn't provide an updated DPP as each new model came out, then each new camera would be unusable for for months until 3rd party software companies got up to date. It doesn't cost Canon any extra cash to make new versions of DPP available for recent earlier models as it has to pay to make the upgrades available for the new ones,. The service consolidates its user base - I buy exclusively Swarovski binoculars because they offer a no questions asked free repair service or replacement of lost parts for at least 10 years. Looking after your customers pays off.
 
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PhotonShark

EOS M50
Jun 10, 2020
25
16
I think you have excessive expectations.
As a matter of interest, what do you think my expectations are?

I'm not sure what the false equivalence of the ten 8 year old camera is about. When you bought your camera, it was DPP 3.

We're talking about brand new cameras with 6 year old software.
 

PhotonShark

EOS M50
Jun 10, 2020
25
16
Looking after your customers pays off.
Exactly. Especially in an era where your biggest competition is the smartphone and the ease of use. The number of people who I know who have ditched "traditional" cameras because the process is becoming "too hard" is unbelievable.

And no. They're not putting filters on their smart phone pictures. They're not doing excessive editing. They just want the process of capturing the memory to looking at the memory to be as easy as possible.

I don't expect DPP to do that much more in the photo editing department. I do expect it to be up to date with a modern and easy to use interface that makes what it currently does, easier. I expect better export and file format options so that I can either share the photo or easily move it into other software for further processing.
 

Antono Refa

EOS R
Mar 26, 2014
1,139
315
As a matter of interest, what do you think my expectations are?
* Slick, easy to use, modern interface. You haven't given any concrete examples, so this can't be that important to you.

* High performance. You haven't given any qualitative expectations, so this can't be that important to you.

* Having a new version, measured by the time passed since the major version number was changed, so this must be really important to you.

I'm not sure what the false equivalence of the ten 8 year old camera is about. When you bought your camera, it was DPP 3.
Because there isn't any false equivalence. Once I bought the PowerShot G15, I can keep on download & install new versions of DPP for free. Somebody has to pay for all those upgrades, which means he doesn't pay for something else he'd like to have.

We're talking about brand new cameras with 6 year old software.
As noted before, the only reason you call it 6 year old software is because Canon didn't arbitrarily increment the major release number since. Canon could have followed the convention of other manufacturers, and name the first version of every year after that year, and suddenly DPP would be under a year old.
 

Antono Refa

EOS R
Mar 26, 2014
1,139
315
Manufacturers have to provide basic viewing and editing software for their cameras otherwise not many would buy them
Indeed.

It doesn't cost Canon any extra cash to make new versions of DPP available for recent earlier models as it has to pay to make the upgrades available for the new ones.
No, it doesn't. And that no extra cash covers no salaries for the SW team. So the new UI, and high performance features, and incremented version number has to be covered by the one time payment on new cameras. With the market shrinking, that's going to be less than you'd get from software companies that require monthly payments, or for each new upgrade.

The service consolidates its user base - I buy exclusively Swarovski binoculars because they offer a no questions asked free repair service or replacement of lost parts for at least 10 years. Looking after your customers pays off.
Yes, but those lost parts don't carry a monthly expense on SW team salaries, office space for them to sit in, electricity to make their computers run, etc. They can calculate the average price of lost parts over said period, and add it to the binoculars' price.
 
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snapshot

5d2,5d4,r5
CR Pro
Jul 24, 2020
8
2
i downloaded and installed DPP to support the r5. happily i could still install and run it on win7. It would be cool, if they would provide raw readers and lens correction etc in the form of source code for a portable library. such a library & API would allow us to combine canon processing with the user interface of our choice. no more waiting for adobe, or dcraw to reverse engineer this stuff. i'll bet the hangup is patents canon licensed for algorithms in use both in DPP and in their cameras.
 

AlanF

Hands. Face. Space.
CR Pro
Aug 16, 2012
7,345
7,144
Indeed.



No, it doesn't. And that no extra cash covers no salaries for the SW team. So the new UI, and high performance features, and incremented version number has to be covered by the one time payment on new cameras. With the market shrinking, that's going to be less than you'd get from software companies that require monthly payments, or for each new upgrade.



Yes, but those lost parts don't carry a monthly expense on SW team salaries, office space for them to sit in, electricity to make their computers run, etc. They can calculate the average price of lost parts over said period, and add it to the binoculars' price.
Fortunately, Canon can do arithmetic and knows it is of no extra cost to them to have new versions of DPP backward compatible with their old models for very little, if any cost of furnishing their new models. They do do that for the EOS line and even modified DPP3 so it would be compatible with the original Rebel, the 300D after an earlier version of DPP lost compatibility. Of course it costs Swarovski money to give a lifetime warranty on their products and of course it costs me extra money to buy their products to pay for it, but it's worthwhile for me to buy something of quality that I know will not let me down or be disposable.
 
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Antono Refa

EOS R
Mar 26, 2014
1,139
315
Fortunately, Canon can do arithmetic and knows it is of no extra cost to them to have new versions of DPP backward compatible with their old models for very little, if any cost of furnishing their new models.
I didn't say otherwise, and I don't see how it applies to anything I said. It doesn't cost them anything to keep DPP backward compatible with old models, but not charging you for the new versions, like DxO & Adobe, means it doesn't have as much resources to improve UI and performance.

Of course it costs Swarovski money to give a lifetime warranty on their products and of course it costs me extra money to buy their products to pay for it, but it's worthwhile for me to buy something of quality that I know will not let me down or be disposable.
How is that relevant to my argument? Go ahead and ask Canon for a lifetime warranty on cameras and lenses, and tell them I'm willing to pay extra for that as well.
 

PhotonShark

EOS M50
Jun 10, 2020
25
16
* Slick, easy to use, modern interface. You haven't given any concrete examples, so this can't be that important to you.
Let me answer by showing you the interface from when the software was released. It has barely changed, so I'm not surprised that there isn't a major release number. An example of a major release number would be going from DPP 3.0 to DPP 4.0

Canon Digital Photo Professional (DPP) 4: Software Overview and Interface Tour

Just watching the tutorial makes me cringe with how poorly designed the user interface was at the time, let alone by current standards.

As I've mentioned in another post. Canon have sold over 100 million cameras since DPP 4.0 was released and that's before the lenses and accessories that go with these cameras. Even if we took a 5 cents a camera off that, that's more than enough to bring the software up to spec.

Because there isn't any false equivalence. Once I bought the PowerShot G15, I can keep on download & install new versions of DPP for free. Somebody has to pay for all those upgrades, which means he doesn't pay for something else he'd like to have.
The upgrades are for the new cameras. The cost for supporting the old cameras with properly designed software is negligible if anything. All the software needs to do is reference a database (created at the time) of camera and lens specific settings.