This is the Canon RF lens roadmap

privatebydesign

EOS-1D X Mark III
CR Pro
Jan 29, 2011
9,810
4,423
I think the auto focus Tilt shift lenses will allow automated focus stacking!
I don’t see that, tilting makes calculating the plane of focus much more complicated to no effective benefit over a parallel plane of focus. It is immeasurably easier to focus stack a series of images from a normal, not tilted, lens than one where tilt or swing has been applied. Indeed given the nature of the plane of focus from applying tilt there are areas of the image that cannot achieve focus, this is not true of a normal lens.

I can see auto focus stacking becoming a thing, heck we had multiple point depth of field modes years and years ago, but I don’t see how tilt makes that more likely.
 
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unfocused

EOS-1D X Mark III
Jul 20, 2010
5,878
3,048
67
Springfield, IL
www.mgordoncommunications.com
I don’t see that, tilting makes calculating the plane of focus much more complicated to no effective benefit over a perpendicular plane of focus. It is immeasurably easier to focus stack a series of images from a normal, not tilted, lens than one where tilt or swing has been applied. Indeed given the nature of the plane of focus from applying tilt there are areas of the image that cannot achieve focus, this is not true of a normal lens.

I can see auto focus stacking becoming a thing, heck we had multiple point depth of field modes years and years ago, but I don’t see how tilt makes that more likely.
Wouldn't focus stacking sort of defeat the purpose of a tilt-shift lens? (Mostly I've seen tilt-shift used to reduce the plane of focus not increase it.)
 

privatebydesign

EOS-1D X Mark III
CR Pro
Jan 29, 2011
9,810
4,423
Wouldn't focus stacking sort of defeat the purpose of a tilt-shift lens? (Mostly I've seen tilt-shift used to reduce the plane of focus not increase it.)
Well that is the ‘reverse tilt’ or ‘toy’ look that became very popular after Vincent Lafouret started using it. Though of course he wasn’t the first, just the one that seemed to kickstart the look.

But used in the traditional sense, going back to view cameras, tilt was used to maximize (increase really is the wrong word) the placement of the wedge of focus. And that really is the key, as soon as you take the plane of focus off parallel to the sensor it is no longer a plane of acceptable focus but it becomes a wedge of acceptable focus. So, for instance, you can use your lens at it’s maximum resolving aperture and put the plane of focus onto the area of the frame most important, generally in landscapes that is the ground.

I have examples from when I was testing my TS-E17 of everything from a dock across a lake and into the far background being pin sharp at f4, not acceptable focus, pin sharp, but the trees not far in front of me are outside that dof wedge so they blur out very quickly vertically. I’ll try and find one or two examples.

EDIT: Here is one from the TS-E17 at f4 with the plane of focus laid onto the dock. This means the dock is in optimal focus all the way to the horizon but the handrail on the same vertical plane of the dock falls out of focus vertically until it enters that wedge of acceptable focus.

1619207834007.png
 
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becceric

Making clumsy photographic mistakes since 1980
CR Pro
Oct 30, 2016
61
108
Well that is the ‘reverse tilt’ or ‘toy’ look that became very popular after Vincent Lafouret started using it. Though of course he wasn’t the first, just the one that seemed to kickstart the look.

But used in the traditional sense, going back to view cameras, tilt was used to maximize (increase really is the wrong word) the placement of the wedge of focus. And that really is the key, as soon as you take the plane of focus off perpendicular to the sensor it is no longer a plane of acceptable focus but it becomes a wedge of acceptable focus. So, for instance, you can use your lens at it’s maximum resolving aperture and put the plane of focus onto the area of the frame most important, generally in landscapes that is the ground.

I have examples from when I was testing my TS-E17 of everything from a dock across a lake and into the far background being pin sharp at f4, not acceptable focus, pin sharp, but the trees not far in front of me are outside that dof wedge so they blur out very quickly vertically. I’ll try and find one or two examples.
You know, l can’t seem to explain the benefits of tilting without using my hands for demonstration. I’ll have to paraphrase your second paragraph in future emails. I’m sure you’ve got copyrights on it ;)
 
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