Yongnuo announces the YN RF 85mm f/1.8R DF DSM

JustUs7

EOS RP
Feb 5, 2020
234
418
Exposure compensation can be easily done in both DSLRs and mirrorless by configuring the set button accordingly so It can change when we press set and turn the wheel at the same time. Very flexible and control ring and camera model independent.
That’s what I’m enjoying about having the control ring option. All this stuff can be done a lot of different ways on cameras. Everyone can configure what works for them.

The thing I like about exposure comp is that depending on the shooting mode and whether or not I’m in auto iso, it can effectively control shutter speed, aperture or iso. I can do that with the lens while actively focusing with Af-On and ready to shoot at any time. I simply watch the histogram in the EVF if conditions are changing.


Ok not trolling, just something I've been wondering.

When and why do you use exposure compensation? Why not just set the exposure to what you want?

I've never really used it so not sure what it is there for....
I’ve adapted to using it when I found it changes whatever parameter I want to get the exposure I want.

In Av at a fixed iso, it’s a shutter speed control.

In Tv at a fixed iso it’s and aperture control.

In manual with auto iso, it’s effectively an iso control.

One ring to rule them all. I just turn until the histogram is where I want it.
 

kten

EOS M6 Mark II
Oct 3, 2015
77
72
Ok not trolling, just something I've been wondering.

When and why do you use exposure compensation? Why not just set the exposure to what you want?

I've never really used it so not sure what it is there for....
I use it a fair bit when called for, admittedly less with modern cameras getting better in such situations but still plenty of times I reach for it. Think of it more as overriding the cameras assumed correct exposure in complex scenes, so here what the camera meter says is correct actually isn't but you still want to be able to use a semi mode for speed. For example getting consistently underexposed images in snow scene but need the speed of a semi mode, dial in EC and carry on shooting in AV/Tv or whatever and the auto exposure can still react correctly to cloud/lighting/shade etc without all images coming out wrong exposure nor slowing you down and maybe missing a shot you can't plan for.

Things like snowscapes or other predictable high key scenes like well lit very white interiors actually tend to be handled well these days by most cameras but I've found a lot of scenes where automation of some type still gets it wrong and EC is just another tool for dealing with it. Along with spot metering and different evaluation modes. Complex scenes with none average tonal balance/weird shaped [compared to average] histograms since most cameras assume the usual mid centric D shape hump and have enough distribution of 15% grey reference to get it right. There are other scene that have a common predictable shape like cameras/phones will usually correctly assume night mode with U shaped bright highlights lots of deep shadow and guess what zone you're likely exposing for. Plenty of odd scenes that are not well served by this average approach though where the camera basically doesn't know what to make of it thus you need to adjust.

The problem is when you have an odd distribution of tonal variation were your subject isn't in the usual zone so you need to skew it. Or have a DR wider than can be captured and you need to choose to clip highlights or underexpose shadows in order to nail the subject exposure the way you want.
 

Jack Douglas

CR for the Humour
Apr 10, 2013
6,839
2,446
Alberta, Canada
Seems to me the mirrorless camera with it's real time view makes full manual the way to go. You can see the exposure you are getting is what you want provided the lighting is not dramatically changing. Works for me but I'm shooting mostly with a long lens. I don't want to hand the exposure over to an automatic averaging algorithm that messes things up shooting subjects in the sky unless it's smart enough to know what my subject is (with AI bird focus maybe it could be that smart - anyone know??). Furthermore, I've found there is a lot of latitude post processing so I don't fret about exposure too much.

Jack
 

tron

EOS R5
CR Pro
Nov 8, 2011
4,960
1,315
That’s what I’m enjoying about having the control ring option. All this stuff can be done a lot of different ways on cameras. Everyone can configure what works for them.

The thing I like about exposure comp is that depending on the shooting mode and whether or not I’m in auto iso, it can effectively control shutter speed, aperture or iso. I can do that with the lens while actively focusing with Af-On and ready to shoot at any time. I simply watch the histogram in the EVF if conditions are changing.



I’ve adapted to using it when I found it changes whatever parameter I want to get the exposure I want.

In Av at a fixed iso, it’s a shutter speed control.

In Tv at a fixed iso it’s and aperture control.

In manual with auto iso, it’s effectively an iso control.

One ring to rule them all. I just turn until the histogram is where I want it.
I totally agree with the usefulness of Exp Comp. And you can of course use it the way that bests suits you.
I have both DSLRs and a R5 so having the same method to control exp. comp is very useful (and very fast) for me. YMMV.
 

drhuffman87

Eos R, RF24-105 F4L, RF85 F2, EF200 F2.8L II
Nov 5, 2020
32
45
www.drhuffmanphoto.com
Quite possibly. The other issue is, I don't have one on all the lenses I use. So if my sense memory were to start getting used to it, I'd be frustrated the next time I used an EF lens. If all my lenses had one, I might assign it something and try and force myself.
I started off using my dad's F-1 and always missed having aperture control control on my lenses on dslr bodies. I'm absolutely ecstatic with the control ring. I also use the control ring adapter for my ef lenses, and hope to never shoot another day without the control ring function.
 

st jack photography

..a shuttered lens, backwards viewing backwards..
This looks great!

I do not often buy 3rd-party gear, BUT designs like this may warrant a few 3rd party buys. When I compare the teeny-weeny Sony DSLR APS-C E-mount they idiotically stuck on their full frames to the massive RF mount, then I can plainly see the advantages of the RF mount size and also the advantages of buying 3rd party lenses, provided that they are specifically designed for the massive RF mount.

Any 3rd party lens for sale that also fits Sony or Nikon isn't worth my time to mount on an R camera. It would be like buying an EF lens and using that on my R body. I will do it, but I will not choose it or seek it out or pay for it going forwards now that I have all R bodies. Most of those "compatible with RF" lenses for sale currently are just EF-compatible lenses with an RF mount stuck on there. I am not paying money for that. I have two EF lenses I use on my R body, sure, but I already had them. Now I want RF lenses, or lenses designed just for RF.

This lens looks to be real cool. As a professional, my advice would be to only buy 3rd party lenses you know were developed for the RF mount ONLY. Otherwise, you are buying an old EF lens with an RF adapter built into it.
 
Last edited:

privatebydesign

I post too Much on Here!!
CR Pro
Jan 29, 2011
10,432
5,655
I use the control ring to adjust Kelvin temp. Works wonderfully.
Another serious question, why do you adjust WB on the fly? Are you shooting jpegs? I do and I trust AWB and AWBW far more than my own eyes or a back screen I can't calibrate.
 
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danfaz

RSIX
CR Pro
Jul 14, 2015
97
72
www.1fineklick.com
Another serious question, why do you adjust WB on the fly? Are you shooting jpegs? I do and I trust AWB and AWBW far more than my own eyes or a back screen I can't calibrate.
Hi, I do this typically at events or parties where the rooms are painted different colors (and I'm bouncing flash) or the lighting has very different colors. It just makes it easier for me to not have to correct the WB in post pic by pic.
 

YEUP

I'm New Here
Feb 26, 2021
12
18
Been in the RF world for over a year now and still haven't touched a control ring. Reminds me of the Touch Bar on my last Mac. Something I had to pay extra for, but never used.
I turned the control ring on my EF-RF adapter totally off. Found myself accidentally changing the settings of whatever parameter I had assigned to the control ring.

Nothing worse than getting everything just the way you want it and then the aperture mysteriously has changed.
 

cayenne

EOS R6
CR Pro
Mar 28, 2012
2,626
585
I use it a fair bit when called for, admittedly less with modern cameras getting better in such situations but still plenty of times I reach for it. Think of it more as overriding the cameras assumed correct exposure in complex scenes, so here what the camera meter says is correct actually isn't but you still want to be able to use a semi mode for speed. For example getting consistently underexposed images in snow scene but need the speed of a semi mode, dial in EC and carry on shooting in AV/Tv or whatever and the auto exposure can still react correctly to cloud/lighting/shade etc without all images coming out wrong exposure nor slowing you down and maybe missing a shot you can't plan for.

Things like snowscapes or other predictable high key scenes like well lit very white interiors actually tend to be handled well these days by most cameras but I've found a lot of scenes where automation of some type still gets it wrong and EC is just another tool for dealing with it. Along with spot metering and different evaluation modes. Complex scenes with none average tonal balance/weird shaped [compared to average] histograms since most cameras assume the usual mid centric D shape hump and have enough distribution of 15% grey reference to get it right. There are other scene that have a common predictable shape like cameras/phones will usually correctly assume night mode with U shaped bright highlights lots of deep shadow and guess what zone you're likely exposing for. Plenty of odd scenes that are not well served by this average approach though where the camera basically doesn't know what to make of it thus you need to adjust.

The problem is when you have an odd distribution of tonal variation were your subject isn't in the usual zone so you need to skew it. Or have a DR wider than can be captured and you need to choose to clip highlights or underexpose shadows in order to nail the subject exposure the way you want.
Ok interesting.

I pretty much only shoot full manual...I never use the "priority" modes...and I just have my meter to spot at all times.

I admit, ever since I started shooting medium format film too...I pretty much always have a spot meter with me and I'll often use that with my digital cameras even.

But when I don't on digital....I will meter with the camera meter on spot meter for something in the scene with 18% grey if possible, or maybe if it calls for it I'll meter for the highlights and then adjust the exposure based on that.

I've been using Nick Carver's metering method and it seems to work pretty well.....

So anyway, I just set the exposure for the scene, I'd not thought about using the more auto metering methods on the camera, nor the auto exposure modes. It makes sense if you do that.

As others have said too...with mirrorless now....you see what you get through the EVF....which makes thing REALLY easy to set fully manual.

I also of late, make use of the sunny 16 rule....and will set my cameras to that and even pre zone focus before I walk about so often I don't even have to hit auto focus if there's fast action, I just compose and shoot (I use back button focus, so that is de-coupled from the shutter release button).

Anyway, thanks....I'm often into my own world on this and forget about other ways the cameras may be used.

C
 

SteveC

R5
CR Pro
Sep 3, 2019
2,409
2,271
Ok interesting.

I pretty much only shoot full manual...I never use the "priority" modes...and I just have my meter to spot at all times.

I admit, ever since I started shooting medium format film too...I pretty much always have a spot meter with me and I'll often use that with my digital cameras even.

But when I don't on digital....I will meter with the camera meter on spot meter for something in the scene with 18% grey if possible, or maybe if it calls for it I'll meter for the highlights and then adjust the exposure based on that.

I've been using Nick Carver's metering method and it seems to work pretty well.....

So anyway, I just set the exposure for the scene, I'd not thought about using the more auto metering methods on the camera, nor the auto exposure modes. It makes sense if you do that.

As others have said too...with mirrorless now....you see what you get through the EVF....which makes thing REALLY easy to set fully manual.

I also of late, make use of the sunny 16 rule....and will set my cameras to that and even pre zone focus before I walk about so often I don't even have to hit auto focus if there's fast action, I just compose and shoot (I use back button focus, so that is de-coupled from the shutter release button).

Anyway, thanks....I'm often into my own world on this and forget about other ways the cameras may be used.

C

If on full M mode, agreed it makes little if any sense. In the other modes the camera is doing some of the selecting and this is your way to override it, on a case by case basis, for that one case where highlights are getting blown out (or maybe you WANT them blown out), without permanently adjusting the camera.

(In fact, IIRC on some cameras at least, you can't even do exposure comp in M mode because it would have no idea what to adjust. In Av mode it knows to adjust T and vice versa (with ISO as a last resort and limited by a max ISO setting), but in M mode where you just nailed aperture, ISO and time in place...what should it do? There's nothing left for a hypothetical exposure compensation to work with.)